Pucker factor

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  #1  
Old 09-21-11, 03:58 PM
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Pucker factor

A long boring flight from Atlanta to Vegas finished with a little excitement. The pilot blew the landing and had to bolter. Not too much fun in a fully loaded 757.

His approach was too high and too fast and he tried to scrub speed and altitude by doing a mini split S at about 3-4 hundred feet. That in itself was stimulating, but when we were 3/4 of the way down the runway and still 50' off the ground people were starting to wonder WTF. He poured on the power for a go around, but not what you expect from a commercial flight.

The pilot came on the intercom and apologised and assured us there would not be any extra charge for the additional miles.
 
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Old 09-21-11, 04:38 PM
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And the flight attendant had been serving him what?
 
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Old 09-21-11, 04:48 PM
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757 practically lands itself unless there is pilot intervention. That's weird. Working on ATL ramp back in the 80's, and noted a DC8 landing and clear of outer markers. Looked odd, but until I looked again, I noted, Uh Oh, no gear. Apparently the crew noticed it at the same time. All 4 Pratt Whitney's boiled black smoke for a mile. Talk about brain lapse! Check list pages must have stuck together.
 
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Old 09-21-11, 05:07 PM
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About 30 yrs ago I was siphoning gas out of my truck into my lawnmower. Overhead I heard a single engine plane quit running, I wasn't able to look immediately but I heard the pilot trying in vain to restart the engine. Finally filled my lawnmower and looked up - the plane was barely above the tree tops, I just knew I was going to witness a plane crash but then the motor started to catch ... put put pow put put pow put put varooommmmm. What do you reckon his 'pucker factor' was?
 
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Old 09-21-11, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
What do you reckon his 'pucker factor' was?
Leather lined large intestine, I would guess!!
 
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Old 09-22-11, 11:07 AM
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I bet it was the First Officers (FO's) first revenue flight. Most people don't know that a new FO's first time ever flying the "real" aircraft is usually on a scheduled flight with passengers in back. There are generally no practice or training flights in a real aircraft. It's simply too expensive. You learn & practice on the simulator and your first time at the controls of the real aircraft is with a plane full of passengers wondering what in the world the pilot's been smoking to botch a landing so badly.
 
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Old 09-25-11, 08:52 AM
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Chandler - There was obvious pilot intervention. The approach seemed normal and then when we were pretty low we did a banked turn right and then a banked turn left - all at an altitude way lower than an approach lineup. That was WTF moment #1, then we went down the middle of the runway 50 feet or so off the ground. Halfway down the runway the pilot put the pedal to the metal and away we went for a go around, WTF moment #2.

My first thought was a landing gear problem but we just went around and landed normally.
 
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Old 09-25-11, 10:58 AM
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Flying to Tampa some years ago from Cincy, all seemed well on the approach when all of a sudden the pilot was seriously trying to "put on the brakes" and dive the plane. This was quickly followed by full power and nose up. After a 360 degree turn, we had a smooth landing and some lame excuse from the pilot.

I later figured out that the pilot had his visual on McDill AFB which is just south of Tampa International and by the time he figured it out and tried to force the plane down to the right airport, it was too late.
 
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Old 09-25-11, 11:21 AM
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When I was in Vietnam in 60's Pilot put us down on these little medal strips several times with no trouble. Got to Saigon and mile and haft of concrete and he bounced us so high we had to go around again.
 
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Old 09-25-11, 12:03 PM
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A C-130, right? Those guys don't know how to land on a real runway.
 
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Old 09-25-11, 12:18 PM
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Wayne, his bank left and right could have been to show the ground tower his aircraft belly at different angles. You could have very well not had gear totally down. Or, his indicator lights weren't showing a lock, and he had to have visual, which, by the time he got down the runway past the tower, he had to do a go around. I have seen that before.
 
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Old 09-26-11, 05:00 AM
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My personal pucker story is C-130 related. Circa 1981 about halfway between El Toro, CA, and Kaneohe Bay, HI, while following the squadron's A-4s on the trail maintenance crew. The couple of dozen of us on the maintenance crew are sprawled all over the cargo pallets and seats. Suddenly we all hear the sound of one of the turboprops unwinding; pretty noticeable even over the din of the other engines. The crew chief, who had been up on the flight deck, comes FLYING into the cargo area and makes a beeline for one of the observation windows on the side roll-up doors in back. Meanwhile we're all eyeballing the survival rafts in the overhead. After landing (about an hour late) investigation discovered a cannon plug had come loose and the engine had done an auto-shutdown.

Have other stories, but that's about the most memorable one.
 
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Old 09-26-11, 05:52 AM
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Yeah, I too have fond memories of military flights. A couple surpassed pucker factor into the realm of check your skivvies. The worst was a ship to ship helo transfer in the North Atlantic. My last flight in a helo -never again. At the time it was just part of the "adventure" I guess.

Did you play golf at Kaneohe?
 
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Old 10-07-11, 08:44 PM
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I liked getting paid to fly in the back of the state police helicopter. Always wondered about that 1/4" cable as they lower you to the ground.
 
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Old 10-07-11, 10:05 PM
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When I was in the Navy I had to take a commuter flight from Kaohsiung to Taipe. It was a not intended for tourist flight so none of the stewardesses spoke English. Well about midway smoke started coming out of the air vents. I really didn't think that was normal but nobody was paying it any attention so I didn't know whether to panic or be puzzled.

Didn't find out till about a year later when I was talking to a flyboy what was going on that day. All you pilots that are LYAO at the newbie can just move along and skip the rest. Air intakes on planes have heaters to melt the ice crystals that form when the air is pumped in at higher altitudes. If they aren't working you get an effect similar to dry ice in water.
 
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