Dodged a bullet this weekend

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  #1  
Old 10-31-11, 10:34 AM
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Dodged a bullet this weekend

Major snowfall over most of the state with some places getting
20" or more. It set new records for snowfall this time of year. I have lived in CT for 30 years and I can't remember a major snowstorm this early in the year.We were fortunate that we got only 2-3" where I live.

Worse than the snowfall are the power outages. Heavy wet snow, high winds and trees that are still mostly leafed out are a bad combination. As of this morning 750,000 are without power 24 hours after the storm. Adding to the misery temps fell way below normal last night. We were in the low 20's and some of the state was in the teens. When you have no heat those temps can be brutal.

I have been seeing a lot of squirrels around the house and their tails look abnormally bushy. My grandfather used to say that was a sign of a hard winter coming. I always dismissed it as an old wives tale sort of thing. Now I'm not so sure.
 
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Old 10-31-11, 11:04 AM
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I don't know if I'd call it dodging a bullet, lol! We got about 1 to 2" of ice. All we had was sleet, ice and wet snow, then the temps got so low it was all ice the next day. Ran my car for 20 minutes and I still had to crack the ice to get it off. Some of it is still out there today. Feels and looks more like February.
I still can't believe we have this already. This is what makes me want to move to warmer places. Don't like it at all.
 
  #3  
Old 10-31-11, 11:20 AM
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I've lived in lots of warm places. Spain, Italy, SC, the Florida Keys and Southern California. Even with the sucky weather I'll take New England - except for the Keys. At least the Keys of 35 years ago. Now they're full of cruise ship passengers and "tourists all covered with oil." Besides, if we live long enough the Northeast will soon be "warmer climes."
 
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Old 10-31-11, 12:40 PM
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I have been seeing a lot of squirrels around the house and their tails look abnormally bushy. My grandfather used to say that was a sign of a hard winter coming. I always dismissed it as an old wives tale sort of thing. Now I'm not so sure.
Dont know. We will see I guess. There have been triple the amount of squirrels around here. Cant remember seeing so many.

The acorns last year were huge and alot fell for several weeks. Enough that they had to be raked up.

This year they fell early and were very tiny. Only a handfull fell. You would not see them unless you stepped on them or heard a few hitting the shed.

I guess we will all see what it means.

We got a wet dusting and it was all melted yesterday. Nothing major.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 10-31-11, 01:32 PM
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Sunny and 75 last few days...but it feels like 85 when the wind doesn't blow. 10% humidity.

Plenty of nice houses and open land out here guys and gals. (Wish I had just waited a year or 2 before moving...could have bought 2 houses for the price of one)

Mountains are 15 min one way, flat desert 15 the other. Plenty of fishing and hunting, relatively little drug use or crime (though you wouldn't know it from the police reports and comments in the newspaper). Colorado River is 45 min away along with gambling if you are so inclined.

We only have 3 seasons though...cool, warm and OMG it's hot!

If I sound like a Chamber of Commerce speaker...it's because I want to get some people to help spread the tax burden around...lol. Shouldn't complain I guess, property tax is about 1/4 of what it was back in VA. Sales tax is a bit high, but we don't buy much.

I don't miss snow or tropical storms/hurricanes even a little bit...and no...we don't get tornadoes either.

btw...back in OH we gauged the oncoming winter by how fuzzy the "wooly worms" were.
 
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Old 10-31-11, 01:55 PM
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Wayne

I bet most of CT looks like a Martha Stewart Christmas card if you have the power to recharge the batteries on the camera.

I lived in CT (Westbrook) and could not believe the problems with the antiquated overhead power and all the reliability problems that come with it (especially inland). That was the first time I lived with the concept and had a hard time understanding/appreciating the problems and results.

I understand the problems with a conversion of such an old concept and every storm reminds me of the possible problems.

At one time, I even got up early one morning to drive 150 miles north to my lake home in northern MN when a big storm was coming. I had underground power and cable and stopped off in town for some fresh food and enjoyed the 3 days watching the snow, wind and the temperature dropping from 35F to -42F. I backed the car into the road end of the driveway and drove out after the plow went through. - It was a nice week-end.

Dick
 
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Old 10-31-11, 01:56 PM
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Plenty of nice houses and open land out here guys and gals.
Don't tempt me, Vic! If I could, I'd be on the next plane. Always wanted to live in AZ. Dread the thought of winter coming.

back in OH we gauged the oncoming winter by how fuzzy the "wooly worms" were
Same thing here. I haven't seen not one yet. Wonder what that means?
 
  #8  
Old 10-31-11, 02:39 PM
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The NE isn't that bad. People like to cry a lot over things that aren't too serious. The news blowing it out of proportion doesn't help much either. I would take NJ over Arizona anyday.
 
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Old 10-31-11, 03:25 PM
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I would take NJ over Arizona anyday
Yeah close to the coast. Would probably never live inland.

10 minutes from the ocean, Boardwalks.
1 hour from atlantic city
45 minutes from NYC
45 minutes from Philly.
Cape may is like capecod 1 1/2 hour.
We have miles of farmland. Yes cows.
The Jersey devil.
Jesey Tomatos...Ramapos are the best IMO.
We dont have to pump our own gas.
Great Italian food and real bagels and pizza
Taylor ham!!! ( Those that dont know PORK ROLL. Pork roll egg and cheese, salt,pepper, kethup on a roll. )
Stay right pass left.
Bruce Springsteen
Bon Jovi
Zeppoles
Streetwise people
Giants
Jets
Mets
Yankees
Devils
malls
Rutgers
Seton Hall
Princeton

And many more.... OK got carried away.

Probably would not live anywhere else. Its all right here in "Jersey"

Mike NJ
 
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Old 10-31-11, 03:55 PM
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Heck Mike...half those things you listed are disadvantages in my mind...lol.

Never been a big city kind of guy I guess. I do remember going through the farmlands of NJ and was amazed...never thought they had that. Then I got up to Patterson and Newark area..and hit what I always imagined.
 
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Old 10-31-11, 04:29 PM
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They call it the Garden State for a reason. The best thing NJ has over Arizona is potable water.
 
  #12  
Old 10-31-11, 06:11 PM
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I have always heard the higher the spider webs, the deeper the snow was going to be. I was out in the woods this weekend, and the spider webs are high. And the wooly bears, or what ever you call them, didn't look bad at all. A little black in the front, and a little black in the back, and a lot of brown in the middle. But I don't believe in them as most as I wish it were true. I remember see one once, that was all black. And I believe that was the coldest winter here I can remember. 3 week of near zero doing the day, and way below zero at night. I have never heard so much snapping and cracking in a house before. A few times I though the roof was coming down.
 
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Old 10-31-11, 06:50 PM
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Okay, I wasn't going to say anything until Vic started it, but.........:

 
  #14  
Old 10-31-11, 07:01 PM
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Why worry about the weather?

Just be prepared and expect anything can happen. If it does not happen, the weatherman will tells how bad it might be it and just wait for the next newscast for the latest "news".

My preparation is to throw the 2 - SUVs into 4WD once every fall and keep about 1/2 tank of gas in them when convenient if it is cold (below 0F).

I have a tough time finding an intelligent spider or caterpillar in the winter.

Dick
 
  #15  
Old 11-01-11, 07:51 AM
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I had the numbers wrong in my first post. It was 830,000+ without power. As of this AM, 60 hours after the storm the outage is down to 640,000.

A big part of the reason why CT is having so much problem is that peoploe actually fight the power companies when it comes to trimming trees overhanging power line. In my town municiple tree crews used to trim (along with the POCO guys) every year. They quit thqat because people were complaining about trees being "slaughtered". Yep, that's the term the tree huggers used. Of course the POCOs have used that in recent years as an excuse to save a few bucks by cutting back on trimming.

I like New England for the 5 seasons, the trees, the mountains, the ocean and the climate. I can take a 30 minute shower and not be concerned. I don't worry about water, earthquakes, fires or mudslides.
 
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Old 11-01-11, 10:12 AM
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I like New England for the 5 seasons, the trees, the mountains, the ocean and the climate. I can take a 30 minute shower and not be concerned. I don't worry about water, earthquakes, fires or mudslides.
I like the Pacific Northwest for the mild winters, relatively cool summers and lush green foliage. Saving water is of little concern, municipal water rates are ridiculously low (although sewer rates make up for that). Although it is also known as the land of earthquakes, forest fires and mudslides I don't worry about any of them. I've lived here all my life (61+ years) and never suffered any damage or loss from any of these perils.

I'm less than an hour from the mountains if I want to experience snow, about two hours from the ocean and maybe thirty minutes from the inland sea. Thirty minutes driving can take me to either the big city or to rural farmland.
 
  #17  
Old 11-01-11, 11:58 AM
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The same storm.....

that hit the NE was in Boulder last Wed. We got a foot of wet stuff and it slaughtered the trees. Funny it wasn't news when it crossed the sparsely populated west.

An aside: Lawrosa you are demented for worshipping NJ, but I still like your plumbing.
 
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Old 11-01-11, 12:35 PM
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An aside: Lawrosa you are demented for worshipping NJ, but I still like your plumbing.
Come on, your all just jealous....



Mike NJ
 
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Old 11-01-11, 03:05 PM
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Wayne, I don't know how it is were you live. But I can see the people fighting with the tree trimmers, if they trim them anything like were I live. The trimmers need some kind of classes, or lessons on trimming trees. They really do slaughter the trees. The worst one I have seen, are when the power lines run down the middle of tree. They trim so much out of the middle of the tree, they might as well cut it down.
 
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Old 11-01-11, 05:25 PM
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Originally Posted by lawrosa View Post
Come on, your all just jealous....
Nope, I've been to Hoboken, thankyouverymuch!
 
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Old 11-02-11, 05:55 AM
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I have to stick up for NJ. I lived in the Philly area for a couple of years and worked out of Philly for another 15. Too many people get their impression of New Jersey from a view out the car window as they're slogging down the NJTP or the Garden State Parkway. Get away from the cities and the parkways and NJ is a nice state. Best tomatoes in the world!

As for the tree trimmers I have no doubt that they aren't particularly concerned about the aesthetics of tree trimming. My opinion - better an ugly trimmed tree than a week freezing your adze without power.
 
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Old 11-02-11, 09:59 AM
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Nope, I've been to Hoboken
It's a shame to judge all of Jersey because of that place. The shore points in Southern Jersey, and the Pinelands are really nice. You need to visit these places before you can make a comment about NJ.
Of course it's got it's bad places, just like other states.
 
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Old 11-02-11, 10:12 AM
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If you go deep enough into the Pinelands, you might run into this guy:

 
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Old 11-02-11, 10:24 AM
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Just my thoughts on ever relocating anywhere that has "real" winters....

"Fuhgedabodit!"
 
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Old 11-02-11, 03:04 PM
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I second that emotion.
 
  #26  
Old 11-02-11, 04:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Wayne Mitchell View Post
A big part of the reason why CT is having so much problem is that peoploe actually fight the power companies when it comes to trimming trees overhanging power line. In my town municiple tree crews used to trim (along with the POCO guys) every year. They quit thqat because people were complaining about trees being "slaughtered". Yep, that's the term the tree huggers used. Of course the POCOs have used that in recent years as an excuse to save a few bucks by cutting back on trimming.
I gotta side with those people in CT. I'm not against all tree trimming for the wires, but in the last 10 years, they POCO has been destroying trees. Growing up they would do some trimming to kepp the limbs away from the lines, but the trees were still intact and looked good. Now they take out the entire middle of the tree. Then the trees die and have to be removed. The street my mother lives on used to be a really nice shady place and now all the trees are destroyed from the POCO. I would love to put a tree in front of my house to try and get a break from the southern exposure, but I know the POCO will kill the tree once it gets tall enough to hit the lines.

I don't understand the negative view on the people who want to save the trees in their neighborhood. They are valuable pieces of property. The increase property values and help keep the place cooler in hot weather.
 
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Old 11-03-11, 06:39 AM
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Most of the trees that caused the problems are on public, not private property. Towns quit trimming because residents were whining about the "slaughter" and the utilities are saying they quit because the PUC denied them a rate increase to pay for it.

If a tree is interfering with the delivery of electricity it should be trimmed or removed. If the tree is privately owned, the home owner should be given the option of paying to have the tree trimmed by an arborist of their choice. If they declne, then the utility company should do what they need to do. If a homeowner opts to plant a tree where it interferes with power lines the POCO or the town should remove it.

This latest disaster will cost billions. Rate and tax increases to pay for it are soon to follow.
 
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Old 11-03-11, 03:42 PM
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Our local power company sends out a news letter every couple of months. In each one is an article about planting trees, specifically planting any tree that will interfere with the power lines. It gives guide lines as to what's ok to plant under/near the power lines and what isn't. The article always points out how the tree trimming costs are past onto the customer and how they can affect power outages, even how certain types of trimming can have a detrimental effect on the tree itself. It always amazes me how some folks will plant trees or even bushes when no forethought to how it will grow.

When I lived in fla they used a lot of underground services. I've painted entire sub divisions that didn't have a single power pole. IMO it's the only way to go if it's not too difficult to cut the ditch...... but there is no way that would fly here in the mountains
 
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Old 11-03-11, 04:31 PM
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Strange. My power company does all the trimming. They send out a pamphlet every year talking about what they do and why. It's far cheaper for them to trim the branches than to pay crews to make repairs from fallen limbs plus the cost of lost revenue. Sounds like they stopped trimming trees to try to get the public on their side for a rate increase.
 
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