Rechargeable batteries

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  #1  
Old 11-25-11, 12:21 AM
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Rechargeable batteries

Can any body tell me, why rechargeable batteries cost so much, or where I might be able to get cheaper batteries. Last I knew, I have like ten cordless tools. When the battery finally gives up taking a charge, it is cheaper to buy another tool. Same thing with my lap top, it hasn't had a battery in over a year. I can't see paying 1/3 of what I paid for the lap top for a battery. Can they be rebuilt ?
 
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  #2  
Old 11-25-11, 04:45 AM
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That's why [IMO] it's best to have all your cordless tools be the same brand/volt. It's easier to keep up with 2-3 batteries that are the same and fit all your cordless tools. The batteries can be rebuilt but I haven't yet figured out how You can send them off to be rebuilt but that's more expensive than a new battery
 
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Old 11-25-11, 05:26 AM
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I tried one of the tool brands that advertised a lifetime guarantee. It didn't help the batteries last any longer, but with some serious pushing I have been able to get a few free ones. Unfortunately they have now stopped making the ni-cad batteries and the newer ones aren't doing well, from those I have talked to.
Batteries plus does rebuild almost anything, but they are not cheap. individual cells can be purchased, again not cheap, and then you need a way to connect them.

A tip for helping batteries last longer is to not run them all the way down. Some will still advise the opposite to avoid the batteries taking on a deformation, but running them to zero risks the worst cell being forced to handle current in the wrong direction which is a death sentence. When you first get an indication the battery is weak, swap it out.

I also saw one brand, can't remember, that had an ac pack you could use. In many cases I don't need the battery and could use an extension and save the batteries for when I need them. May have to build my own for my brand.

Bud
 
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Old 11-25-11, 06:55 AM
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There are numerous places online that sell replacement cells. If you are handy, most packs can be opened up and the cells replaced. The last I did were two packs for a portable DVD player. I was able to replace the cells for a little less than half the cost of buying a new pack.
 
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Old 11-25-11, 10:13 AM
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I bought a pair of batteries for my Black & Decker drill a few months ago. They are marked DeWalt but the same battery. I had found one at the big box a few years ago for about $60 and most that I found via the Internet were close to the same price. The company I finally bought from advertised two batteries at around $19 each so that is what I did. It may have even included free shipping.

Unfortunately, I don't remember the company and I can't find any paperwork. The way I originally found it was simply doing a Google using the part number of the battery pack.
 
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Old 11-25-11, 10:21 AM
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I finally remembered where I bought my cells. They came from All-Battery. As always I would shop around to compare prices but the cells I got from them were good quality Japanese manufactured ones.
 
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Old 11-25-11, 11:39 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
That's why [IMO] it's best to have all your cordless tools be the same brand/volt. It's easier to keep up with 2-3 batteries that are the same and fit all your cordless tools. The batteries can be rebuilt but I haven't yet figured out how You can send them off to be rebuilt but that's more expensive than a new battery
That are some of the tools I have, same band/volts. I have 2 sets of multi-pack, drill, saw, flashlight, and sander. The pro-teck came with a sander, that is what was killing the batteries. The vibration was making the cells come apart. I bought a set ryobi, love the saw, it makes lots of cuts before it is dead, the drill/driver will snap a screw if your not careful. But the batteries are like $60.00
 
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Old 11-26-11, 12:09 AM
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...makes lots of cuts before it is dead, the drill/driver will snap a screw if your not careful. But the batteries are like $60.00
Sounds like my Deskjet printer to me. Printer is cheap but the ink is outrageous. The manufactures just want you to keep coming back again and again for supplies.


After reading all the posts I just have to shake my head. Has anyone heard of an extension cord and a good tool that will probably last you a lifetime with no added expense? Charge the batteries, change the batteries, buy new batteries blah blah blah. Seems like a huge waste of time and money to me. For the average homeowner I just don't see it other than a way to keep sucking up your money.
 
  #9  
Old 11-26-11, 06:11 AM
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For homeowner use, I would agree most cordless tolls don't make sense. I will say a cordless drill is a good idea because that will be used the most frequently. Otherwise, unless you have lithium-ion batteries, they will usually be dead when you need to use the drill again.

For professional use, cordless is great. Especially when working on a job site that only has one outlet working and 5 different trades plugged into it. Having a cordless drill that weighs less than 2 lbs in my hand all day is a dream compared to holding a corded drill. The brake on the cordless drill is great for preventing over driving screws as well.
 
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Old 11-26-11, 06:19 AM
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I am down to Dewalt and Makita LIon. Dewalt 18v, because no body else makes a good airless finish nailer and cordless jigsaw. Makita because of size, weight and reliability. I find myself online buying most of my batteries (NIB of course). Dewalt's batteries are overpriced at big orange, etc. $90 for a battery....get real. I buy them for about $35 each and have never had a problem with them. Of course using them constantly, I have to go through a bunch every few years.

I think the reason no one has a corded "adapter" for cordless tools is the transformer won't take the draw down under use.
 
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Old 11-26-11, 07:40 AM
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I don't replace my cordless drill very often so I wind up just buying a new one when the batteries go. I recently replaced my Hitachi Li-ion at work with the Festool CXS. I really like the Festool but it has two drawbacks that really get under my skin. If I had the cash, I would have sprung for their larger cordless model. The Hitachi still has some good life left in it so I took that home.

What would the point of a corded adapter be when you can just buy a corded drill?
 

Last edited by drooplug; 11-26-11 at 07:41 AM. Reason: Questions have question marks.
  #12  
Old 11-26-11, 08:03 AM
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I remember back a few years (like around 10 yrs..lol)...a cable installer or electrician or similar was doing work in the barracks buildings I ran. He had a Panasonic (?) drill with a belt pack that held 2 oversize batteries, as I remember. Took the weight out of your hand and slung it around your hips. He said it would last him all day on jobs like ours. You could also just put a single battery in the drill and use it that way.
 
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Old 11-26-11, 10:52 AM
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I agree with Droo concerning corded tools. I bought my Milwaukee corded drill when I was in my 20s and it's still going strong. While I mostly use the B&D cordless (which I bought about 10 years ago) if I have any serious drilling to do I use the Milwaukee.
 
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Old 11-26-11, 12:20 PM
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I couldn't imagine any of my cordless tools being the only one of that type I'd own..... well except for my flashlight that takes the same battery pack as my drill

Cordless tools are great but I wouldn't want to be without my corded ones.
Speaking of drills, I still have my B&D drill I bought for about $7 at Kmart around 40 or so yrs ago. It wobbles a little and I'd probably get rid of it if it wasn't the 1st power tool I ever bought - but it still works
 
  #15  
Old 11-26-11, 02:35 PM
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Bud9051, You had mentioned for better battery life, not to drain the battery all the way down. I have a battery charger/conditioner that I bought for my RC truck. And the first thing it does when you plug in a battery, is puts a 20 minute draw on the pack, then charges it. Have things changed for battery care.
 
  #16  
Old 11-26-11, 05:14 PM
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Bought me some rechargeable batteries for my camera along with the Sony Cycle Energy Quick with refresh charge(draws them down).

Just got it so not sure just how well it works.

Anyway, here is a link to the comments section at Amazon (hope this is legal here) and if you read the comments by 'NLee the engineer' he seems to know his stuff. He did tests on a lot of batteries and chargers and will probably be more than you want to know.

http://www.amazon.com/Sony-BCG34HRE4...owViewpoints=1

Happy reading.
 
  #17  
Old 11-26-11, 05:28 PM
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And the first thing it does when you plug in a battery, is puts a 20 minute draw on the pack, then charges it.
You might be better off with a smart charger.


[Aside: It is not necessary to run a discharge before every recharge. Such practice is a left-over from the days of dumb chargers. With a smart charger, you can top-off your batteries anytime, without fully discharging them first.]
 
  #18  
Old 11-26-11, 06:21 PM
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A lot has to do with the type of rechargeable battery. My brother who knows a bit more about this stuff was explaining this to me one day. I do not recall the details though. I know my Festool will prevent you from using the battery when its charge gets too low. I believe my Hitachi did as well.
 
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Old 11-28-11, 12:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
I remember back a few years (like around 10 yrs..lol)...a cable installer or electrician or similar was doing work in the barracks buildings I ran. He had a Panasonic (?) drill with a belt pack that held 2 oversize batteries, as I remember. Took the weight out of your hand and slung it around your hips. He said it would last him all day on jobs like ours. You could also just put a single battery in the drill and use it that way.
Gunguy45, I was surfing the net, and can across the belt pack you were talking about. That would work fine if you didn't have any power. But if you had power, it wouldn't make much since, to be tired to a battery pack, you might as well use a extension cord.
 
  #20  
Old 02-25-12, 06:55 PM
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I just recently came across these rechargeable battery rebuild kits, they come with everything you need to rebuild your rechargeable batteries. Also you dont need to solder or weld them like most rebuilds. They are called battrx rechargeable battery kits, i order a few off ebay. they work great, def worth trying out.<a href="http://www.battrx.com">.</a>
 
  #21  
Old 02-25-12, 10:48 PM
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As far as cordless tool batteries are concerned and charging them up Dewalt has a great multi voltage charger that will charge some Black & Decker batteries even when they are near dead at least according to something I read once. Amazon.com has it here is the link DEWALT DC9310 7.2 -Volt-18 -Volt 1 Hour Charger: Amazon.com: Home Improvement . I am going to buy that for a Black & Decker drill I bought at auction that has two batteries. They sell them surprisingly cheap for a charger from some of the dealers.
 
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