to be young and able to conquer the world

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  #1  
Old 02-28-12, 03:51 PM
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to be young and able to conquer the world

I had to do some drywall work in the duplex where my oldest son lives. The young girl [18-20yr] that lives there wanted to watch me tape the new drywall. She watched me for a few minutes, asked a few questions and then said "now I can tell my dad that I know how to do drywall work" ...... if it was only that easy
 
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Old 02-28-12, 04:34 PM
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LOL,
If only experience could be captured in a book!

Bud
 
  #3  
Old 02-28-12, 07:32 PM
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I think all young folks are that way my niece who is 22 or is it 24? I just can't keep up with that child and I say child quite literally as she still doesn't know what she wants to be when she grows up. I love her dearly almost like a daughter but she doesn't to this day know what to do with herself maybe one day she will grow up
 
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Old 02-28-12, 08:44 PM
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It's those two minute DIY videos on YouTube. The youngins think everything can be learned in two minutes.
 
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Old 02-29-12, 03:21 AM
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I've gleaned a lot of knowledge from those You Tube instructionals. The action only takes a couple of minutes, like changing the LCD on a GPS. Turns out to be fairly simple.
I just don't see how the kids nowadays can figure they can do what takes years and years of experience to do by watching those videos, or even the home shows on TV. (30 seconds for a total demo of a bathroom). I have a helper who is in his 20's. He has done framing. Knows nothing about trim. He thinks he does. I have to show him all the tricks I have gathered over the years, and he is amazed that an old goof can know so much I even bought him a smooth faced hammer. He was trying to drive home finish nails with a waffle faced 28 oz framing hammer.
Remember, when you are in your 20's you are running through life with your hair on fire, ten feet tall and bulletproof.
 

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  #6  
Old 02-29-12, 04:41 AM
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Ya, it takes a little age for you to figure out you're not as smart as you thought you were. If I could relive some of my younger years I'd make some different choices ...... but then I suppose I wouldn't be the person I am today.

When I was young I remember working with some 'old' men that were in their 30's and 40's, now I know some young men in their 30's and 40's
 
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Old 02-29-12, 09:58 AM
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Ant that the truth. When you are a teenager, 30's and 40's are really old. Then when you get there your self, you find out how young it really is.
 
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Old 02-29-12, 03:26 PM
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I am now in full of knowledge of the fact that, growing old is one of the toughest jobs I have ever taken on. We have all heard of the "Golden Years" ..... I am inclined to believe the person that come up with those words, knew nothing about what getting older would be like.
 
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Old 02-29-12, 03:39 PM
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No, I think Golden Years describes things perfectly. It always feels like you are carrying bars of gold in your pockets.....more each year. It seems like you move slower and everything feels heavier the longer you go.

I used to be able to throw a 100lb sack of horse feed over my shoulder and carry it into the old chest freezer we stored it in when I was 15...now a single bundle of shingles make me grunt.

And I'm not that old! Just a bit worn out and out of shape....maybe I'll try to do something about that this year.
 
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Old 02-29-12, 03:50 PM
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It always feels like you are carrying bars of gold in your pockets.....more each year
That I wouldn't mind but I think they gave me bars of lead instead
 
  #11  
Old 02-29-12, 04:36 PM
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I will be 60 in two months. At 55 I was aging too fast, getting weaker, could not hardly swing a 60 Lb bag of concrete mix on to my shoulder. My arthritic joints really were hurting me..

I kept hearing from my doctor and all the other, healthy young snits that I worked with, " All you need to do is eat right, exercise and you will feel younger and better".. Blah, blah, .

Bah humbug I said, you cannot do any thing about feeling weaker and tired as you age ...

I got in such bad shape it was affecting my job. So, one day four years ago I made up my mind to try it the snits way. I bought a home gym, dropped all sugars and junk food. Started eating right and exercising daily on the gym. Dropped 25 pounds, got bulked up again sort of like when I did back when I was 25 y.o. and working out with free weights. ..

I felt great, start slinging 80 Lb bags of concrete mix like it was 40 lbs. So the snits were right after all, but they didnt teach me how to overcome the greatest obstacle of all to one living healthy.............. Self disciple. ....

Six months later I got in to moving/selling/renovating our homes and got distracted from my healthy routine, too much work to be done to take time to work out.....

Eating on the run at fast food joints, gradually I went back to my bad diet, gained my weight back, sold my home gym. Today I am out of shape, arthritis flare ups daily, mildly overweight, high blood pressure, new stent owner and a keyboard warrior.
 
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Old 02-29-12, 04:58 PM
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I had to do some drywall work in the duplex where my oldest son lives. The young girl [18-20yr] that lives there wanted to watch me tape the new drywall. She watched me for a few minutes, asked a few questions and then said "now I can tell my dad that I know how to do drywall work" ...... if it was only that easy
That's how I learned how to do electrical. Ok, it took more than a few minutes, more like a few years, lots of forums, and talking to every EC I can.

gregishome, I'm a keyboard warrior, and I think I'm the youngest on here at age 16!
 
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Old 02-29-12, 05:34 PM
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I would have handed her the tools and said "Give it a try."
 
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Old 02-29-12, 08:20 PM
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My daddy was a painter and he spent a lot of his working life in a shipyard that catered to yachts. One day he was striping a deck when Mr Bigbucks walked down the dock and saw him at work. The following is my remembrance of the conversation.

Bigbucks: "They have a tool for doing that?"

Daddy: "Yes."

Bigbucks: "Is it an expensive tool? Can anybody buy one?"

Daddy: " Anybody can buy one. About ten dollars at a paint store."

Bigbucks: "I'm going to buy one and do my boat!"

Daddy, as he turned back to the job: "Of course you DO need to know how to use the tool."
 
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Old 03-01-12, 03:13 AM
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Furd: sort of like the plumber who was called to an upstairs apartment in NYC. No heat in the radiator. After checking things out, he tapped on the valve and it started gurgling hot water. Gave the lady a bill for $100. She flipped out. Protested the bill. He took the bill back and revised it. Service call $50.....knowing where to tap the radiator $50.
 
  #16  
Old 03-01-12, 08:39 AM
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That reminds me of this story:

Picasso was in a park when a woman approached him and asked him to draw a portrait of her. Picasso agreed and quickly sketches her. After handing the sketch to her, she is pleased with the likeness and asks how much she owed to him. Picasso replies: "$5,000."
The woman screamed, "but it took you only five minutes."
"No, madam, it took me all my life," replied Picasso.
 
  #17  
Old 03-01-12, 08:56 AM
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No, I think Golden Years describes things perfectly. It always feels like you are carrying bars of gold in your pockets.....more each year. It seems like you move slower and everything feels heavier the longer you go.
ROWL!
Maybe it's time to join your wife.
 
  #18  
Old 03-01-12, 10:27 PM
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I used to run a large high temperature hot water heating plant. It had five boilers and an ultimate capacity in excess of 98 million BTUs per hour. (For reference most home heating systems are less than 100 thousand BTUs per hour.) The main pipes were between 8 and 12 inches in diameter and the system held in excess of 80,000 gallons of treated water at 300 degrees. This plant ran 24/7 except for the Labor Day weekend when we took it down for maintenance.

I normally was not working when the plant was fired up after these maintenance shutdowns but I would hear horror stories on how hard it was and how much running around it took. None of these stories made any sense to me and the procedures dictated were a complete "monkey see-monkey do" exercise rather than using any logic at all. One Christmas Eve we had to take the plant down to change some Chinese flanges that had been installed at the last shutdown and I was going to restart the plant. (The Chinese flange fiasco is well documented and while no lives were lost as a result of these inferior flanges there were some close calls.) The heating and air conditioning mechanic, a young guy with small children wanted to know how long it would take to get up and running because he was going to play Santa Clause. I told him, "Bob, you'll be out of here by midnight."

The contractor was supposed to be finished by 7PM and let us start filling but they had some trouble with the welds on the final flange and didn't get the okay from the non-destructive testing agent until about 8:30 and still needing to make a final pass of the welds. Nonetheless we got word to start filling and about 9 PM I lit off the first boiler. Had the start-up been done by the past practices it would have been somewhere between 6 and 8 AM before the plant was back on line but because I knew the actual design and working parameters of the plant I had it up to full operation by 1AM. And yes, Bob did get to go home before midnight.

After that the plumbers and A/C mechanics ALWAYS wanted me to do the start-ups saying that they never experience such an easy start-up in all the years the plant had been in existence. The bosses were gabberflasted (yes, I know ) that I had made such a complex job (in their minds) so simple. Instead I trained the other plant operators in the PROPER method and explained why my method was preferred and the old method was severely flawed.

So, just because something has been done one way for years and years doesn't mean that it has been done properly all those years.
 
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