Watching Holmes On Homes - Holme's Inspections

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  #1  
Old 03-25-12, 07:59 PM
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Watching Holmes On Homes - Holme's Inspections

Watching Holmes On Homes - Holme's Inspections

It is exhausting just watching all the major problems Holme's deals with...

Lots of screw-ups in far too many HVAC systems!

We need to do much better on initial installations...
Tons of HVAC rehab to do...
 
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Old 03-26-12, 03:44 AM
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Not only HVAC, but electrical and plumbing as well. Too many fly by night "remodelers" out there during the "boom" and too few critical inspections were done, either due to stretched out inspectors, no permits (most likely) or sloppy workmanship covered up.
I watch the programs, too, and acknowledge this stuff happens off screen, too. I deal with it daily without the cameras rolling.
His shows are entertainment, but informative as well. He takes things too far in some instances, but it's his money so let him fill the hour up.
Since remodeling is all I do, I have a caveat in my estimate/quotes regarding hidden problems that are not code. I emphasize all items must meet code or the job stops. This is extra cost for them, but I want a safe house when I am through.
My guys make fun of me emulating Holmes when I tell them to tear it all out
 
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Old 03-26-12, 04:31 AM
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Not only HVAC, but electrical and plumbing as well. Too many fly by night "remodelers" out there during the "boom" and too few critical inspections were done, either due to stretched out inspectors, no permits (most likely) or sloppy workmanship covered up.

I watch the programs, too, and acknowledge this stuff happens off screen, too. I deal with it daily without the cameras rolling.

His shows are entertainment, but informative as well. He takes things too far in some instances, but it's his money so let him fill the hour up.

Since remodeling is all I do, I have a caveat in my estimate/quotes regarding hidden problems that are not code. I emphasize all items must meet code or the job stops. This is extra cost for them, but I want a safe house when I am through.

My guys make fun of me emulating Holmes when I tell them to tear it all out
Way to go, CHANDLER!

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ge...#ixzz1qDmcPBUh
 
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Old 03-26-12, 06:21 AM
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I frequently take side streets when traveling in and out of town, just to prospect for new work and just from the outside one can see tens of thousands of dollars of work that is required. Then, knowing what can be expected on the inside, that number just explodes. Frankly, Holmes could throw a dart at any map and come up with a basket case to put on his show, at least 9 out of 10.

Between poor workmanship, changing codes, changing requirements (energy, lead, asbestos, ventilation, radon, yada yada), it will be a wonder if half of our existing housing stock survives.

Bud
 
  #5  
Old 03-26-12, 04:05 PM
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It amazes me how many people neglect their homes. I've been seeing a lot of roofs with crumbling shingles on my way to work. I can only imagine what the inside is like with all that water damage. I saw one roof that was in the condition that had a large patch of new shingles laid over the worst spot.
 
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Old 03-26-12, 04:35 PM
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True, Drooplug. I did a roof a while back and the 34 year old shingles were the consistency of potato chips. Thank God the 30# felt protected the plywood cuz the shingles sure weren't cutting it anymore. The felt was exposed on a good part of the roof, too!

I think that a lot of people neglect their houses (or can only afford a substandard contractor who does shoddy work) because everyone is strapped for cash.

Hardly any working class family can save money anymore, you spend it as fast as you get it- everyone runs up big bills on their credit cards, there's peer pressure to have nice houses, nice cars... have all the new electronic gadgets, movies on demand, flat screen TV's with digital cable and TEVO, iPhones w/ 4G, and the list goes on. People get all that stuff but then can't afford to maintain it.

I just think if you compare the cost of what people felt were "needs" back in 1970... with the "needs" of 2012 you come up with a much longer (and more expensive) list. When you compare the average wages and average expenses... I don't think the ratios are even close to being the same anymore. It seems like you have the ultra rich and those who are barely making it. "Middle" class seems to be getting smaller and smaller, while the dollar just doesn't stretch as far as it used to.
 
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Old 03-26-12, 04:36 PM
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I go past one on the mountain we are working on, and it appears to be 1970's vintage. Overall appears to be in good shape, but there are two 8x10 brown tarps tucked under shingles and tacked down. I can only imaging the damage that is happening....and it is for sale, with no one living in it. It will only get worse.
 
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Old 03-26-12, 04:55 PM
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I was just at my wife's, cousin's house installing a receptacle in the kitchen for their wall hung TV. See one directly below where I want to be so I open it up. I find 5 wires, in a handy box, no ground, no connector. Pull the box out and find "they" (not the HO as they don't do remodeling) covered up a box about 6" away and just pulled the wires to the new spot. FOR 6"?!?!?! Yeah, we run into that stuff all the time.
 
  #9  
Old 03-26-12, 04:59 PM
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The guys at work were giving me a hard time about making so much money because I just bought a new truck. Never mind that I have basically been saving since I bought my last one in 2003. I also don't blow all my money as soon as it hits my pocket. Sure, I indulge in some of those luxuries like cable tv and a cell phone, but I also make sure I have the money to do so. The one guy I work with lives at home with his mother and still lives paycheck to paycheck. He actually works a second job on the weekends too. It's amazing what a decent set of math skills can do for you.

When I was laid off in 2009, the first thing I did was apply for unemployment. The second thing I did was to open Quicken and work out a budget for being on unemployment. I figured out where we needed to cut our spending. Figured out how long we could live without me working. And that's the plan we lived by until I became employed again. So many people just go full throttle until they lose everything.
 
  #10  
Old 03-26-12, 09:15 PM
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As a home owner and landlord I see things a little differently than you guys do but not all that differently. I can and will tell you just a couple of horror stories I have seen but want to stop a moment and say to the contractors here that I would hire you guys in a New York minute you sound great.
Now though to my horror stories. Many years ago my cousins lived a few towns over in an old house that they were renting from a friend of a friend if memory serves me right. Well a few days went by and we were invited to their place. At first glance the house didn't look all that bad it was a two story bungalow with maybe a bit worn down yard and maybe in need of a paint job. The inside though was a different story the kitchen was a bit run down but the real horror story was the basement it was dark so I thought maybe I should look up to see if there was a bulb installed in an outlet. Not only do I not see an outlet but I don't even see an electrical junction box and the wires were taped together and not in a box.
The second horror story is just down the block from our house and that place has had bats and other animals going in the house. It also has a furnace that really does nothing but belch smoke not to mention outdated wiring and plumbing. The house also has an overgrown yard and is a real eyesore in the neighborhood. When I see houses like that it just makes me mad as I keep our rental house up to code and even a bit above code just to make sure my tenants are safe. Luckily I know a guy in our neighborhood that is a great contractor too so if I have any serious work that needs doing I call him.
 
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Old 03-27-12, 03:24 AM
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Hedge, you reminded me of a neighbor at the bottom of the mountain. He's dead, now, but during the time he lived in the house, the outside sometimes had Tyvek on the outside, sometimes blue xps, little siding, no paint, and it wasn't an old house. His kids had an estate sale after he died and I went down there. The inside of the house was pristine!! T&G walls, no smells, hardwood flooring, etc. It just amazed me he would never fix up the exterior and have the interior so nice.
 
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Old 03-27-12, 03:32 AM
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Like much of the south, our area received a lot of storm damage last spring. I know the roofers were really busy afterwards but there are still houses that have tarps on the roof. I know of a few that the tarps are all but useless - tattered from the sun and wind. Makes me wonder, did they spend their insurance check and now can't afford to fix their roof ??
 
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Old 03-27-12, 04:12 PM
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I think you hit it, Mark, regarding spending the insurance money. Last year when the tornadoes hit in North Georgia, many lake front home$ received considerable damage over on Lake Burton. I believe the problem there was, most of the property was vacation or weekend habitats and were drastically underinsured, or not insured at all. That's sad. My stepson who has a good roofing business in another state asked why I didn't rush over there and get in on the payouts. I just told him I'd wait until all the fly by nighters were through and go on a case by case basis and fix what they messed up under the guise of repairs.
 
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Old 03-28-12, 12:17 AM
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Speaking of fly by nighters Larry we had some scammers come to our house when I wasn't feeling well trying to convince me and my at the time 83 year old mom that we had a roof leak. I am guessing you have heard of the gypsy spray on roof scam where someone comes in your house with a spray bottle hidden and makes you think you have a leaking roof. Well we were convinced for a short time until I checked on their business license with our states data base. I found no license and we cancelled the check. I also later found out by doing a criminal background check online that they had a criminal background.
Oh by the way that house you told me about with the worn out exterior but great inside reminded me of a great eating place called the Half Way House near Coltons Point Maryland. We have some friends who still live in the neighborhood but haven't been there in years. I think they called it Half Way House because it was half way between two small towns there. The food was great there
 
  #15  
Old 03-30-12, 02:22 PM
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....block from our house and that place has had bats and other animals...
Like this:


Bat Infestation Under Tile Roof- Roofing Miami, FL- Istueta Roofing - YouTube


I don't care how high that roof is, I would've jumped.
 
  #16  
Old 03-30-12, 02:34 PM
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I like bats...I've had two crawling up my arms at once. (Yes, I had a jacket and gloves.) Of course I like giant hissing cockroaches and black widows also.

Not that I'd want them living in my roof.
 

Last edited by Gunguy45; 03-30-12 at 03:00 PM.
  #17  
Old 04-01-12, 09:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Baldwin View Post
Like this:


Bat Infestation Under Tile Roof- Roofing Miami, FL- Istueta Roofing - YouTube


I don't care how high that roof is, I would've jumped.
I would have jumped too Baldwin. I don't know how bad the bat situation is or was but do know one was seen on the lower floor. The house up the street was a rooming house and as far as I know has only one tenant now. At one time the brother of the person living there rented the attic room and lived there for a long time. Apparently they didn't mind the bats but I sure would and the other things getting in the house like rats and mice. All of which are bad to have in your house. I haven't been to that house in a long time the tenant I know up there is just too batty for me.
 
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