speed channel

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Old 06-21-12, 04:21 AM
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speed channel

While I don't travel a lot, I've noticed that every motel in ohio and michigan along with various hotels at myrtle beach that we've stayed at - none of them have the speed channel With the exception of basic cable, the speed channel is a part of every cable/satellite package here locally. Is it not so elsewhere?..... or are us redneck hillbillies the only ones who have racing in our blood
 
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Old 06-21-12, 04:36 AM
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We get it via DISH, although I'm not a hillbilly/redneck or NASCAR fan.

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Old 06-21-12, 05:20 AM
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Mark....we didn't have Speed for about 3 yrs until our smaller cable company was bought out. It was on the old companys "sports package". It's in the new basic cable.

I believe TG. He'd probably rather watch coverage of the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance or the Lifetime channel. You know those Jarheads.
 

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  #4  
Old 06-21-12, 05:34 AM
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Yeah. I used to get Speed channel for free. Now they have put it in with another package. They love to do that to get you to buy a bunch of stuff you don't want. I go without.
 
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Old 06-21-12, 05:47 AM
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We get it for free.

I wouldn't expect a retired leatherneck to understand something as complex as NASCAR
 
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Old 06-21-12, 01:11 PM
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We don't get it for free - we still have to pay the cable/satellite bill As far as I know every local cable/satellite package includes the speed channel. I'm just a little surprised it isn't the same everywhere.

Vic, Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance is that a communicable disease?
 
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Old 06-22-12, 03:14 AM
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Left-turn-only racing is good on TV, but you can't beat the sound and smell behind the wall or on the infield.
 
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Old 06-22-12, 04:29 AM
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...smell behind the wall...
The porta-potties?

Actually quite a few redneck Marine NASCAR fans [comes from cadence, I think; "your LEFT, your LEFT, your LEFT, right, LEFT"]. I'm just not one of them. I prefer open-wheel; less rubbin' and more racin'.
 
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Old 06-22-12, 02:58 PM
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Wellllll, yeah, that, too, but I was referring to spent fuel smell. I like SCCA racing. I got the opportunity to run my modified TR6 at Road Atlanta many years ago. Instructions were very clear....keep it under 60 mph.....Huh? Yeah, right. First round to memorize the course was at 60. But I liked the scream. You can always apologize later.
 
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Old 06-22-12, 03:04 PM
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I don't like open wheel just because one little touch between a couple cars and you have a major wreck - I like them being able to keep going afterward.
 
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Old 06-22-12, 07:50 PM
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More driving skill involved. [TG now running for cover as the NASCAR guys pelt him with empty Bud bottles]
 
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Old 06-22-12, 08:14 PM
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More skill? Are you kidding? Other than the fact they run faster...their cars weigh half as much, probably have wider tires (not sure of that), they use center locking hubs, not lug nuts. They don't have to take their hands off the wheel since everything is electronic. Their cars are jacked up by a crew member with a pneumatic hose. They have wings and fins all over the cars to provide down force. It's all technology. Just like Italian, Japanese, and German supercars. I'd rather drive a Camero ZL1 than a prancing horse....

It's like the difference between driving a go-cart and an ATV on the same track. Which would take more skill?

btw...it would be Miller Lite...not Bud...lol.

Glad I could be the first pelter!
 
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Old 06-22-12, 08:33 PM
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Maybe. I'm certainly willing to say it's possible. I still don't enjoy watching it as much.

No worries, Gunny, I don't drink beer
 
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Old 06-23-12, 04:48 AM
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Thought beer was the state beverage in WI. [TG was born in the beer capitol]

Vic, at least the Indy cars, et al, are race cars and don't try to sell themselves off as something else - "STOCK" cars, puh-leeeease.
 
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Old 06-23-12, 04:57 AM
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TG is right, stock cars are basically a modified frame with a drive train and artsy fartsy body panels that resemble a Ford/Chevy. McLarens are.....well McLarens. Center of gravity at 2" off track, wide tires. You'd never feel a curve like you do on Stock cars. I do like their cute little body jacks for pit crews. I always thought they operated off an onboard compressor. And they whine too much.
 
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Old 06-23-12, 05:01 AM
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Tow guy = former jet engine mechanic
Indy cars = whine

See a pattern here?
 
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Old 06-23-12, 05:05 AM
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I think the whine is from the high rpms and while the open wheel cars might make more horsepower, it's hard to beat the sound of the all american deep throated V-8

I would love to see NASCAR go back to cars that more resembled their factory counterpart...... and single car teams - not that either will ever happen
 
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Old 06-23-12, 05:49 AM
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More skill? Are you kidding? Other than the fact they run faster...their cars weigh half as much, probably have wider tires (not sure of that), they use center locking hubs, not lug nuts. They don't have to take their hands off the wheel since everything is electronic. Their cars are jacked up by a crew member with a pneumatic hose. They have wings and fins all over the cars to provide down force. It's all technology.
You make it sound like my grandma could race F1. With all that stuff, they still have to take corners at 90 mph or they won't have any traction. And when I say "corners", I mean real ones, not those lazy bends in NASCAR.

All technology? You think NASCAR doesn't have any of that? How else do you squeeze more HP out of an engine with all those rules? I just read an article about how the advancement in valve spring technology has substantially changed NASCAR.
 
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Old 06-23-12, 08:53 AM
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I'll admit...I occasionally watch F1...not that it's on at the right times for me much. There's plenty of strategy going on in corners and all. Indy car does nothing for me except on restarts and at the very finish. That's when they get a bit more aggressive and make some real moves. The rest of the time it seems like way too much follow the leader. Same thing with some tracks in Nascar actually. One guy gets 7 seconds ahead with good tires and plenty of gas and it's pretty much over unless there's a caution behind him.

Still, the tech difference is like a F4 vs a F22. They are both high speed (Mach 2.2+) combat aircraft...but that's about it.

F1 has carbon composite 7 speed seamless shift electronically controlled transmissions...Nascar has a 4 speed manual with a clutch pedal. F1 has aero parts that can be opened to reduce drag at certain times....Nascar has nothing similar. F1 uses devices that can boost power about 80HP for a short time...nothing like it in Nascar. Carbon composite brake rotors vs steel. 1400 lbs vs 3400 lbs with approximately the same HP. Heck, the steering wheel on an F1 car can cost almost $40K!

I didn't mean that the F1 drivers aren't skilled..they have to be to do what they do.
 
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Old 06-23-12, 10:02 AM
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Both spend millions and millions of dollars on R&D to develop technologies. Compare a NASCAR vehicle from 1990 to one from 2010. Tell me there isn't a huge difference in the technology of the motor design, the metal alloys, and electronics. This idea that NASCAR is more accessible because the teams don't spend as much money as the teams in F1 is absurd. They both spend millions of dollars and are out of reach of anyone that doesn't have major sponsorships.

I really don't get why it has to be one or the other. Personally, I'm not a big fan of car racing to begin with, but if I had to choose, I would go with the open wheeled guys. I find it more entertaining. NASCAR and F1 are just different. I don't see why one has to be better than the other. They both involve some very advanced technology and skill to take around a track at high speed.
 
  #21  
Old 06-23-12, 10:40 AM
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The driver skills and budgets are a big difference between NASCAR and F1. If there was not such a difference there would be at least one American driver in F1 considering the much higher level of pay in F1.

True, the F1 drivers look young, know how to shave and trim themselves, compared to NASCAR. They know how to really communicate well with the public and the camera and how to communicate the "real driving" information back to the "techies". Montoya was a good driver in F1, but he could not supply enough accurate input to the rest of the crew, so he took a take a big cut in pay to go to NASCAR.

The F1 teams (12, each with a maximum of 2 cars) are very costly to run because of the salaries, development costs and travel expenses. In the past 5 years, the driver's salaries have run from $50,000,000 salary for Michael Schumacher ( he also gets the souvenir money, charges for personal interviews, bonus, winnings and other items) down to about $7,000,000 for the lower end.

There are major travel expenses because of the widely scattered locations (Dubai, Turkey, Indonesia, Shanghai, Tokyo, Australia, Brazil and a lot of others in between and many in Europe. A typical team uses 1 or 2 jumbo jets for 2 cars, 1 chassis, a couple of engines, wear and extra parts and a fully equipped gym module that is the last to go in and the first to come out because it is usually the most highly used piece of equipment. On one 2 weekend trip to Japan and Indonesia, Ferrari had over 300 engineers along also. Most drivers will slowly walk the entire course several times before even getting into the car.

There is not an emphasis on top speed in F1 and most cars set their governors for the 17,500-19,500 rpms. The cars with the top trap speeds usually do not win because winning is created by slowing from 195mph to 40 mph, keeping the right line, knowing when to accelerate and control the course without being penalized for blocking. There are 2 types of tracks that the same cars run on in a year (city layouts and dedicated road courses). A race is between 2-1/4 miles and about 4 miles with 10 to 20 corners (left and right). Very, often cars will put a wheel up and over the curb at 150 mph to keep a line. There is no such thing as a "fuel stop" since a car is not allowed to add fuel. There are pit stops for tire changes (all 4 wheels in 3.2 to 4.2 seconds) and 2 of the 3 or 4 tires types must be used in a race. If you have a pit stop for more than 2 tire changes you have little hope of winning. Because of the cost of cars and no provision to knock the dents out and replace fenders and wings, there is little contact, because both drivers are usually off for a few weeks. In the F1, there are no crashes of the "tanks" cause by another team member (or friendly team) behind a leader or close to the front to get more commercials and a green-white-checkered finish.

The F1 races almost always start on time and they usually drive through rain, but fog may cause a time suspension for a while. NASCAR puts on a very good, busy race where you can usually smell everything at a low price. F1 races are best seen on T.V because of the scope and the ability to see all the details you cannot see at NASCAR. At a F1 race the 200,000 people are spread out over a long route. A F1 race in person is really an event to experience IF you can get a ticket (some are sold out 5 to 10 years in advance, if tickets are ever available) and afford the big $$$$ prices.

The money is invested by the sponsors since they are interested in a world wide auto market and not just a domestic market.

Because of the technology, expense and logistics and the very high entry fees, there are a limited amount of teams and there are only 2 or 3 teams that make the cars completely, while most buy engines and create a special chassis for the team.

It is good there are both types of racing in addition to the good old dirt tracks and 1/2 mile paved tracks.

Dick
 
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Old 06-23-12, 12:02 PM
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As to no American F1 drivers.... I think that's more due to the popularity of the sport in the US. There's not much of a system for them to progress up the ladder AFAIK. They have one race in TX...that's it. People in the US have more exposure (from years back on those dirt tracks and local paved 1/4 and 1/2 mile tracks) to Nascar style racing than they do to F1 style. So that's what drivers naturally progress up the experience chain in. Just like drag racing.....it's popular to some extent in some other countries...but not like here.

Same thing as baseball, football (both American and European style), basketball, etc. When was the last time you saw an Italian or French Pro baseball player? Or an American soccer player go overseas and be successful? But you see quite a few Japanese, Cuban and Puerto Rican players in the bigs...because they grew up playing ball. You also see used up players (think David Beckham) come over here for big bucks just for the name recognition.

And yeah...I think F1 is much more expensive for teams than Nascar. 1 or 2 semis cost a lot less than 1 or 2 747s. I think F1 has lots of restriction on how long the engines and trans have to last, what can be changed between races, etc....but their parts are outrageously expensive. Sprint cup has more than a few one car teams w/o major sponsors that run a partial schedule to try and fund their lower series entries. I know some are start and parks...but hey...at least they qualified to get in the game. You could probably build a Sprint cup car for around $200k....might not be competitive without all the support structure of course...but you could build one. I'd guess an F1 car would run 3-4 times that?

Years back I worked at the Long Beach Grand Prix as a "wrecker" driver (outside the track unfortunately.....my boss and the senior guy got to use the pretty trucks on track and in the team areas) and I have to say....you could hear the engines screaming and echoing up the streets for miles it seemed. Never got close enough to see a single car...but I sure dealt with a lot of the crew members and hangers on in the week prior to the race. Some of them had no clue how to drive US cars. Probably didn't even have licenses to do it. I probably towed or unlocked 3 rental cars a day for a week...and I was working from 4-midnite.

OK...1/2 hr to the start of a Nascar race...gotta go! lol
 
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Old 06-23-12, 12:59 PM
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Wonder what the dealer's reaction would be if I walked into the Toyota showroom with a wad of cash and asked to buy a new V-8 rear wheel drive Camry.
 
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Old 06-23-12, 01:28 PM
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They are going to have an F1 race in NJ in 2013. Should be interesting. I think the superbowl is going to be here next year or the following too.

How does Indycar compare?
 
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Old 06-23-12, 02:46 PM
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drooplug -

I thought ink the 2013 F1 race in the U.S. was to be at the new Texas Raceway. It must be ready for next year after some tweaking following the F1 drivers running there after the Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal. It is possible they found an adequate place in NJ in case the Texas track is not completed to the F1 standards.

It will be nice to have F1 back in the U.S. since it has been 6 or 7 years since 3 years or so of racing at Indy when F1 gave that date to either Bahrain or Dubai because they had better facilities than Indy. I did see the 1999 and 2000 F1 races at Indy and they kind of boring (even with 200,000 people) compared to real open road course in Europe.

As far as Indy, the cars are kind of crude and heavy with a limited fan base anywhere outside the U.S. They do work fine on the U.S. ovals and the temporary fender-banging city races.
 
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Old 06-23-12, 02:48 PM
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Hey...here's how people can change.

Back when I first started watching Nascar...I hated when they went to the road courses in Sonoma, Watkins Glen and Road America.....I just wanted them to bump and bang on 1 1/2 mile tracks at 185 MPH. Now I look forward to the road courses as some of the bigger tracks are just pretty boring.

If you open wheel types haven't watched any of the Nationwide or Sprint races on a road course...you might want to give them a try.
 
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Old 06-23-12, 04:55 PM
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I did search to see when the nj race was supposed to be and the news articles said 2013. I went to F1's website and they have the TX track in their 2012 lineup for November.

I do enjoy the street courses far better than ovals. I suspect NASCAR is much more fun in person. Many years ago, my Dad and uncle took me down to the local track to watch people race around this tiny oval in their beaters. My uncle was involved with filming the races for local tv. I thought it was going to be stupid, but I really enjoyed it. On TV, it would have stunk to watch.
 
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Old 06-23-12, 05:20 PM
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I've been a race fan since I was old enough to know that anything with wheels could be raced
Up until about 35 yrs ago I'd listen to the NASCAR races and the Indy 500 on the radio and of course go to the local dirt track. I'm more into stock cars than any of the other forms of racing mainly because they used to resemble [and at one time were] actual street cars. It is neat to see someone make a NASCAR race that you have seen race yrs earlier at a dirt track!

I like the road course races just as much as the ovals but it mystifies me why anyone would attend a road course race - there is no way you can see all or even most of the race but they sure are neat to watch on TV.
 
  #29  
Old 06-23-12, 07:00 PM
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i saw 4 F1 races in person (2 in Europe and 2 in the U.S. - Indy).

Indy was not a good track because if the layout and being too flat after they spent $75,000,000 to get it ready for F1.

Mark is right about not being able to much on a road track, especially after my second road track race I saw at The Spa in Belgium. It is about 5 miles (20 corners) through, up and around in the trees (1/3) and the remainder on a more open area. Because of the length, there were plenty of stands for the 150-200,000 people if you wanted to walk a lot. It was great and tickets for a grandstand seat for one day is about $500 (or 500 Lb British) IF they are available.

My second was for the Italian Grand Prix that a friend got some "sacred" tickets. It was as fast, loud and exciting as you would expect and the Italians used it as excuse for an annual 3 day party and tried to make everyone an "official" Italian. It is almost as hard to get a ticket as the Monte Carlo race in Monaco (city track with 180 mph down to 30 mph as the cars come out from under a hotel on the harbor). It not good to see a race there there, but is great on TVs, but all tickets are sold for the next 10 years at least. There you see all the rich and famous.

There is race tomorrow (06/24/2012) at 7:00 AM CDT from Valencia, Spain. The track is a newer, 3.5 mile beautiful track (unfortunately flat) that is on and along the harbor. - 25 corners and speeds of 195 mph down to 40 mph with a record average lap speed of 125 mph. One thing different is that they absolutely hate yellow flags in a F1 races and the have plenty of cranes to pluck the few $3,000,000 (+or-) cars that crash dump them out of the way to prevent a slow-up.

Dick
 
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