mail box post

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  #1  
Old 07-26-12, 01:49 PM
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mail box post

My son's mail box was hit again for the umpteenth time

This time they knocked the post and all out of the ground. Trouble is when the county last paved the road, they laid asphalt around the box. The box can't go any further back or the mailman won't be able to reach it. About the only other location it could be placed would be near the neighbor's box about 150' up the road.

The mailbox post sets back in the hole ok but it's wobbly. Any ideas on what would be good to pour in along the post to make it secure again?

How come none of these people that have hit his mailbox never stop and claim responsibility? This time it was obvious that the offender left with body damage.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-26-12, 02:41 PM
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What kind of post? Wood or steel pipe?

I like the idea I saw elsewhere of mounting a steel pipe and welding it to a truck or car spring. Weld a length of pipe to the other end of the spring and embed that in concrete.
 
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Old 07-26-12, 02:44 PM
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4x4 wood post

I like the idea of installing a pipe further down the bank and out to the edge of the road with a spring in the mix but man, that would be a lot of work
 
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Old 07-26-12, 02:46 PM
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You could cantilever the arm of the mail box several feet from a post set well back from the road.. Make the arm so it will rotate then lock it in position with a shear pin.
 
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Old 07-26-12, 02:51 PM
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The problem is the edge of the road drops off about 3' or so fairly quick so any post set further from the road involves a fair amount of work and planning. Unless my son comes up with the time and inclination - I'm all for quick and easy
 
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Old 07-26-12, 03:07 PM
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Maybe a 6' long billet of 6" diameter cold rolled steel, set in a 14" footing with concrete grout (not quickrete) 2 1/2' deep. Someone would definitely have body damage after hitting that
 
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Old 07-26-12, 03:07 PM
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About the only other location it could be placed would be near the neighbor's box about 150' up the road.
Cry me a river...my mailbox is at least five HUNDRED feet away from my front door and it's uphill both ways! (It really is.)

USPS has some VERY specific regulations concerning the mounting of mail delivery boxes and among them it states that the post must be of a substance that will break if hit, or something like that. Kind of puts the kibosh on the steel post and spring although I have seen many boxes that do not have break-away posts.

What MAY work is to set the post on a steep angle, maybe 45 degrees so that the box is where the carrier can reach but the post is well back from the street. Or maybe a half T would work holding the box toward the street while the post itself is well back from the street.
 
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Old 07-26-12, 04:03 PM
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USPS has some VERY specific regulations concerning the mounting of mail delivery boxes and among them it states that the post must be of a substance that will break if hit, or something like that. Kind of puts the kibosh on the steel post and spring although I have seen many boxes that do not have break-away posts.
Interesting. Many of the mailboxes around here are made from brick.

Why not put a large post before the mailbox. So should anyone hit that area, they hit the sacrificial post first and hopefully the mailbox is spared.
 
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Old 07-26-12, 04:36 PM
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I would like to add that you should run any "new" ideas by your carrier BEFORE you proceed with them.
 
  #10  
Old 07-26-12, 10:14 PM
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I thought I would post a link to the official guidelines so that everyone knows exactly what the US postal service wants you to do with your mail box here is the link https://www.usps.com/manage/know-mailbox-guidelines.htm. Among one of the guidelines is that the placement has to be approved by the postmaster. Luckily for us we have never had to deal with that as we have delivery to our door. Good information though for everybody to know in case they ever move or know someone who has the same situation.
 
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Old 07-27-12, 05:37 AM
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USPS suggests using a break away box - it isn't required although back in the 80s when I worked in Winter Springs Fla a bunch of home owners tried to out do the neighbors with fancy mailboxes. One cost $10k. It started out with fancy brick, the next guy added a brick planter and the most expensive one included a pond with a statue and fountain. The mayor's daughter hit one of those high price mailboxes and totaled out her car. That's when the city of Winter Springs outlawed the brick mail boxes.

Anyway, back to my original question - what would be good to mix up and pour along the 4x4 to keep it from wobbling? Because of the steep bank that drops off at the edge of the pavement, it would be too much work/expense to move the post.... unless it's to the other end of the property next to the neighbors box.

Why not put a large post before the mailbox
You'd have to cut a hole in the pavement to do that. The existing post is surrounded by pavement where they paved the downward edge of the road to help keep the pavement from breaking off.
 
  #12  
Old 07-27-12, 05:48 AM
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Furd had to wreck my thoughts.

Steel i-beam, incased in fence post concrete. Other then a plow truck, anyone that hit that mail box will still be there when you check your mail.

I know a couple people around my house have taken a similar route and using an auger, cemented their mailbox post into the ground.
 
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Old 07-27-12, 06:23 AM
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I don't think building a stronger post is the answer. At least not in my neck of the woods. A steel I beam post wouldn't faze the 40 mph snowplow.

The answer as someone else suggested is an offset post with a breakaway (rotate) arm supporting the mailbox. Unless the edge of the road is a near vertical drop it shouldn't be too hard to figure out how to mount a post even if it had to be moved a bit from it's current position. .
 
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Old 07-27-12, 06:55 AM
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Wayne, I was being a smartbass with the i-beam comment. A plow would not notice it, but a regular passenger vehicle sure would.

The common setup around my area is a 4x4 seated in fense post concrete with a 2x4 extending out with the mail box on top.
The way the 2x4 is mounted is the interesting bit. My friend has hers setup with a large spike going through the 2x4 into the center of the 4x4. A small ~2in nail is used to keep the 2x4 in place and not rotating. If the mail box is hit (plow or what not), the 2in nail is the break-away point and the 2x4 simply rotates.
Provided the mailbox doesn't take too much damage, replace the 2in nail and you are good to go.

That being said, it's not the answer if they actually hit the post itself. It also doesn't sound to be a good solution to the original problem as the 4x4 would have to be pretty tall by the sounds of it.

marksr;
Is the mailbox or driveway on a corner or something?
Just wondering how/why it would be getting hit in the middle of the summer.
Would moving the mailbox to the other side of the driveway remove it from the kill zone?
 
  #15  
Old 07-27-12, 07:47 AM
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marksr -

In rural areas around here, the cantilevered swinging boxes (tethered or spring loaded) are fairly common because even with a deep ditch (ditches are 2' to 5' deep), it is a one-time situation no matter how many times the boxes get hit by a plow or car. The box itself may be destroyed but that is an easy fix.

Most of the snow plowing is done at speeds between 40 mph and 60 mph, unless flying wings are used to throw the snow further out or provide visibility.

Even the kids at night (summer only) hanging out the window with baseball bats will not tangle with a cantilever, since they have no idea of the resistance or reaction to a hit.

Dick
 
  #16  
Old 07-27-12, 08:59 AM
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I'm going to take a different approach - since it's apparently going to continue to be hit, can the post be made to give in such a way that you can quickly and easily just set it back up?

Another way, can you create a joint or something which will disconnect upon impact but that then can just be reassembled?
 
  #17  
Old 07-27-12, 09:37 AM
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I'm not sure what the solution is going to be. My son makes enough money to pay all his bills but doesn't have much left over

He lives on a narrow 2 lane road. On his side, the bank goes straight down to his yard level [3'-4'] on the other side the road goes straight up [about 50'] The speed limit is only 25 mph but some travel twice that speed using the middle of the road. Problems occur when they meet oncoming traffic
There have been 2 vehicle accidents in his yard including an uninsured girl that landed her car on top of his sports car. I've been trying to get the county to install some guardrails but they only say "maybe later"

I'm thinking of trying some wood shims between the post and the asphalt to see if that will steady the post. If that doesn't work maybe forcing some thin set in along the post will. I agree that it will only be a short term solution and sooner or later the mailbox will need to be either relocated or re engineered.
 
  #18  
Old 07-27-12, 10:02 AM
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Could sink a metal holder of some sort into the ground (concrete), which will easily accept a 4x4. That way, when it's hit, replace the 4x4 and reinsert it into the sleave. Not a great solution, but the 4x4 would be reasonably inexpensive and could be the break away point.
 
  #19  
Old 07-27-12, 10:42 AM
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Could even get one of the vinyl fence post sleeves, cut it so it's flush with the ground, then insert the post.
 
  #20  
Old 07-27-12, 06:38 PM
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I'm thinking of trying some wood shims between the post and the asphalt to see if that will steady the post. If that doesn't work maybe forcing some thin set in along the post will. I agree that it will only be a short term solution and sooner or later the mailbox will need to be either relocated or re engineered.
Get some 3/8" crushed stone and push it down into the space as best you can. Maybe jiggle to post while in the process. Perhaps give it some attention over a few days.
 
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