More government interference

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  #1  
Old 09-19-12, 08:42 AM
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More government interference

New school lunch guidelines imposed by the federal government are having an impact. Kids are boycotting!

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And just like everything else that the federal government interferes with (education, health care, to name just a couple) the costs increase. The USDA raised the price of a school lunch for kids who buy their lunch so that it is closer in line to what the government pays for kids that don't.
 
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Old 09-19-12, 09:05 AM
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Yes they did away with french fries in my sons school, and they changed a few other things. Not happy I can tell you that!!!

My concern now is that he is not getting enough calories. Listen, the kids burn it right off playing outside, sports...etc. Especially a 12 yr old. Now he complains he if starving.

$2.80 a day for lunch for 1 slice of pizza, a milk, and the rest he don't eat. He is a kid. He is not eating the salad or other healthy things offered or given.

My son ieats chicken and/or pizza. That is it. No beef, deli products, salads...etc.. He may take a banana once in a while but their fresh fruit is sub par and none of the kids want to eat it.

That is why I feed him the biggest breakfast I can, and pack him some snacks, PBJ???

In the end its costing me double. Snacks and school lunch.
 
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Old 09-19-12, 10:00 AM
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While I agree our country has an obesity problem I don't agree with any one size fits all policy. I remember when I was a kid, I ate enough for 2, was always hungry and skinny!

It's good that the gov't sets a standard for school lunches. Back when I was in school there wasn't any regulation and sometimes the meals were pretty raunchy. I remember every friday was 'pizza' day BUT they didn't serve pizza but rather a stale slice of bread with all the leftovers from the week cooked up in sauce served on top of the bread along with a slice of cheese..... no wonder I almost always packed a lunch.

Our grandson is a picky eater and on the days he doesn't like what's on the menu he carries his lunch. I don't know how much his school charges for lunch.
 
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Old 09-19-12, 10:24 AM
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marksr -

In high school, our Friday lunch was always fish of some kind. - No government regulations, but the preference of the students and parents. Of course there was always the option to go "ala carte" or bring your own brown bag that most kids did. We had one guy that never brought a lunch, but solicited pennies for 4 years and lived on "Sloppy Joes" for 4 years ($0.07 each then). They must have had some nutritional value, because he was all conference in several sports . - We saved the White Castles for evening outings.

I usually had a PB&J from home because it was easy and good. When I got to college, we would run across the street to diner/cafe where all the intern doctors from the Mayo Memorial hospital got something very cheap and quick and we ordered it also. - It was called a "Doctor's Sandwich" and it was a PB&J on white bread. I have graduated to using wheat bread when I make one.

On a daily or annual basis, I think my present diet is acceptable despite the occasional forays into the unknown. I even occasionally eat uncooked ground beef (fresh ground myself) because the "experts" advise you that grilled ground beef (hamburgers) can have carcinogens it it. - My wife does not approve, but I eat it because it is good and I enjoy the process of all the preparation.

Dick
 
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Old 09-19-12, 10:25 AM
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There was a letter to our local newspaper last year that a child in a local school took her own lunch that her Mom had made for her. When a Teacher or Lunchroom worker saw what was in it, she said the girl would have to eat a school lunch or at least take some of the ala-carte items in addition to what she had. The little girl took some fruit or whatever and the Staff person sent a bill for the items home with her. According to the Mothers letter....the little girl didn't even eat the school items.
Just ridiculous...

This was very similar to the story that was reported nationally.

I don't know about anyone else in my age group.....but most of the time I loved the food at school. The watery chili, the mostly tomato sauce chili mac, Mac n Cheese, some sort of lasagna product, meat loaf, fresh bread and rolls every day, fresh cakes and pies, those tiny little cups of ice cream, REAL butter that they had to mix the yellow coloring in before serving. Real farm lunch food, or as it was called in OH...supper. Dinner was the last meal of the day. I was not a fan of the milk...always seemed too warm and metallic tasting. Of course...all the food was cooked by older farmer wives...I doubt we had any food professionals at all other than maybe at the district level. I looked at what they serve now....almost all processed stuff. Chicken patty sandwich, nuggets, toastitos and a cheese cup(????), salad, grapes.....come on! Where's the real food, those sound like snacks to me. Nuggets, pizza, processed patty sandwiches, tacos, chicken tenders, burritos? It's the institutional versions of fast food.

Even back then...what they served wasn't enough for most kids my age. I remember coming home hungry one afternoon and asking my Mom if I could makes some bacon and eggs. Dozen eggs, 1 lb of bacon and almost a whole loaf of bread later I was full. I was about 15 and weighed 150 lbs.
I also drank soda..prob 2 or 3 a day. What I didn't do was eat tons of fast food and I was constantly riding my bike to friends houses, walking the woods, building forts, mowing the lawn, etc.

If I had a kid...he'd be packin his lunch...

It's not what kids eat at school....its what they do and eat after school.
 
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Old 09-19-12, 10:32 AM
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I got a message from the payment service I use to keep money in my daughter's account and the new law requires children to take a half cup of fruits or vegetables or the meal is actually more expensive. Fortunately, I have an eight year old near vegetarian, it's the meat I can't get her to eat. That said, she knows even if there are no fruit or vegetable choices which look good on a particular day to take some anyway and just not eat them. Is that what we really want to be teaching our children?
 
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Old 09-19-12, 10:57 AM
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Mike - Last week a local TV station did a report on the new "healthy lunch" in CT. They interviewed kids in high school as they were tossing their government mandated (the school actually had cafeteria staff inspecting the kids trays to make sure they took the fruit) two pieces of fruit in the garbage can. The kids all said the same thing - "I don't want it" or alternatively "it doesn't taste good."
 
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Old 09-19-12, 11:26 AM
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I can't wait for school lunches. My oldest will be starting school next year.
What I do know so far is;
He can't bring PBJ sandwiches (potential nut alergies in school), boiled eggs, egg salid sandwiches (or similar), Strawberries, and a whole list of other potential alergy foods (think fish was included).
Packaged treats (carmel cakes, moon pies, etc) are also on the ban list.
Basically, take all the foods my son likes (loves PBJ sandwiches), and replace it with foods he'll eat because he's starved.

When I was a kid, PBJ sandwiches, egg salid sandwiches and other (not allowed items) where great wholesome food I could eat for lunch when times where tight. Limiting the packaged treats (say one per lunch) is fine, but when the school sends a check list as to what you can and cannot pack for lunch...
Don't get me started on the supplies a 4yrs old needs for school these days.
 
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Old 09-19-12, 11:32 AM
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Mine can bring PB&J and the school even has one you can buy available every day if you don't have a lunch and the regular choices don't appeal but she had someone with a peanut allergy in her class in kindergarten and could not bring PB&J that year. I'm 42 so my childhood is not that distant in the past yet I recall no such thing as a peanut allergy when I was a child - from where did that come? I read this week that about 1 in 25 children has this allergy to some extent.

Eggs I can see now as well - woman in the cube row next to mine flips out if someone eats an egg in any preparation at their desk because she can smell it and hates the smell. Which means I eat them at my desk just to irritate her - I eat quickly so the evidence is gone by the time she's looking for the culprit
 
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Old 09-19-12, 01:20 PM
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The kids aren't obese from what they eat. As Mike said, the kids burn off the calories off at recess or playing. They are obese from what the parents let them do with their time. Video games end on end, ad nauseum. The only thing they are exercising is their fingers and an occasional wisp of an arm. I have grandchildren who are into that, but luckily their parents kick them outside on pretty days, or send them to the beach a few blocks away.
Let them eat what they will, but make them burn it off and exercise. Mrs. Obama has it all wrong with regards to what we should feed the kids.
 
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Old 09-19-12, 01:47 PM
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Also aside from the federal level, local level has caused issues also. In my county they give the kids a type of credit card. They go up and get their lunch and the card gets swiped. Then they are still hungry and go up and get snacks. This is an added charge on top of the $2.80 lunch.

I had that on restriction for my son but at the beginning of the year they do not have their records straight. So what happens? I get a $30 balance in the mail from the school.

Now get this. The policy is if you have a $10 balance two things happen. They cut off your online access to see your child's grades in real time, and your child cannot get a regular lunch. They will only offer an alternative lunch. Also you cannot even pay cash to get a regular lunch until the balance is paid.


Appalling to say the least. I refused to pay. They started harassing my son, and constantly asking him for money. He was afraid to go stand on line to get his lunch for fear of the lunch lady saying something.

Talk about extortion!!! The BOE is one step away from the Mafia IMO. After several calls to the BOE it continues. So I wrote letters and sent them the the stat level, county, and locally to the school principal. Whoa!!!, My phone rang off the hook. Now they want to talk to me....LOL

I also filled the form for the anti-bullying. ( This is why I think they were so concerned.)
It was not a student bullying but the lunch staff and food director. They were using these tactics to get me to pay my dept that I felt I did not owe. As a matter of fact its two years old now.

In the end basically they made it all go away. I just wanted my child left alone and told them, "I AM NOT PAYING THAT BILL PERIOD".

They determined that there was no bullying, and took the balance off the computer and it is now in the food directors records only. She said if you want to pay it down the road just contact me, and no one else. It never got to the state level either. The just hushed me by giving me what I want.

Also I stated that cutting off my access from the on line real time grades is affecting my sons education. Its bad enough he does not do well in school, and that makes it worse. All for an unpaid balance. Also when talking to the BOE I stated that the policy violates the no child left behind rule, and I may fill out that form also......

Oh the alteritive luch is a 1/2 of turkey sandwich and a milk. I told them that does not meet the federal nutrician guide line. He told me the piece of tomato was the fruit...and crap like that. I threatened to again take action at the state level.

Uggg... You all got me going now. They are not too happy with me. 66% of my taxes go to the schools. Sorry about all the teachers out there on this site, but I am going to fight the BOE at every meeting I can. I constant vote against their budgets.

Ohh geez... I could go on and on.. This is why I want to move to the mountains and arm myself.

Cant bring PBJ to school, cant say God during the Pledge of Allegiance, cant have a damn Christmas tree anymore....... I feel like a Stepford wife..

OK Im done...LOL
 
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Old 09-19-12, 01:57 PM
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C'mon down Mike, we got room!
 
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Old 09-19-12, 02:31 PM
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I have gone to my grand-daughter's school several times for lunch. Typical suburban middle school. There was a choice of 4 different meals that were not bad (not gourmet), but adequate even for a picky eater like me.

She has a card that is swiped when she goes past the cashier. It is like a prepaid credit card. Her parents get an itemized list of the meals and anything else bought in the cafeteria, so they can check up on what is going on.

I don't know if they accept cash (probably not because of reporting and controls) and the kids rarely have much cash unless it is required for a game/teaching of selling, buying, making change and counting backward. They are now working on a billing system that allows the "kids" to use their cell phone/iPod that is coordinated with the system.

Dick
 
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Old 09-19-12, 02:45 PM
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mitch17, I have a grandkid with a peanut allergy. The reason there are so many kids with peanut allergies is because now the kids are tested and they weren't when we were kids. The reactive kids back then displayed symptoms but they were usually dismissed as something else.

I have done a butt load of research on peanut allergies and I have concluded that the problem, and most especially the danger, is waaaaay overhyped. The problem is that the doctors can't/won't tell parents what their kids reaction might be and parents get scared. Of course a cynic might posit that the allergists jump on the peanut allergy bandwagon 'cause they can smell mo' money.

Incidentally, my grandkid's school allows PBJ in the lunchroom. They have a peanut free table for the kids with allergies.

Of course none of that matters because I just heard that we're all going to die from arsenic poisoning in rice.
 
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Old 09-19-12, 03:09 PM
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Of course none of that matters because I just heard that we're all going to die from arsenic poisoning in rice.
Rice from China? ...............
 
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Old 09-19-12, 03:17 PM
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If I remember correctly, when my kids were in school, if I forgot to send a check [for 1 month x 2] they would still feed my kids but what they got was a free PB&J sandwich. When I was in school I don't remember if there was any provision for a kid without a bag lunch or money for the school lunch - I think they just bummed off the rest of us.

Dick, I remember fish on friday. Grew up around a lot of catholics, they always ate fish on friday. Do they still do that? I don't remember the school making any provisions for catholics on friday but most of them went to catholic schools anyway.
 
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Old 09-19-12, 04:33 PM
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I always brought my own lunch to school. I had the same size lunch from kindergarten all the way to 12th grade. Thanks mom!

I think the problem with school lunch is that it the cafeterias are run by for profit businesses. So now they have to turn a profit on the food they sell. So they use the cheapest quality food they can find. no one would be able to afford to pay for a school lunch that is made with quality food and would still turn a profit.

mitch17, I have a grandkid with a peanut allergy. The reason there are so many kids with peanut allergies is because now the kids are tested and they weren't when we were kids. The reactive kids back then displayed symptoms but they were usually dismissed as something else.

I have done a butt load of research on peanut allergies and I have concluded that the problem, and most especially the danger, is waaaaay overhyped. The problem is that the doctors can't/won't tell parents what their kids reaction might be and parents get scared. Of course a cynic might posit that the allergists jump on the peanut allergy bandwagon 'cause they can smell mo' money.
I'm not familiar with the research you did, but I will have to disagree with you on this. My half-sister and nephew are severely allergic to peanuts. It is to the point they have to carry an epipen around with them. And both of them found out about their allergies from consumption, not allergy tests.
 
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Old 09-19-12, 05:30 PM
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mark -

I grew up in a city (St. Paul) that had a high percentage of Catholics and also a high percentage of Catholic elementary schools, but when it came to high school most were blended into the high school population. It was interesting that Catholic kids attending elementary schools 2 blocks apart (one German catholic and one Irish catholic) and they never knew each other until they grew up with each other and the Protestants in high school and the food menus respected the preferences. Now, it seems to be a tradition. We did call the Catholics "Crappie (fish) Crunchers" and no one objected since it was just descriptive. It was a great learning experience since it was just life and no reporters trying to create a "story".

One of the best foods here is a "fish fry" on Friday at the local bar, club or lodge. They never use good fish like walleye, but use good cod and pollock and it is still great/good. I go to a Norwegian Klubb (highly Protestant) meeting on Fridays once a month and 300 Norwegian Protestants eat Torsk (fresh unfrozen cod flown in from Iceland because the Icelandic is better).

Years ago, the new money was Protestant on the other side of the river (Minneapolis), but the old money in east side (st. Paul) has adjusted to the big world where there are no boundaries.

The peanut problem is a very serious thing because there are many reasons for the use of peanuts/peanut oil. The Romans and Spaniards had it right when they used olive oil.

Dick
 
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Old 09-19-12, 06:01 PM
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Nah! Rice from LA and TX. It seems that years ago the rice fields were cotton fields and arsenic was used on the cotton to control the boll weevel. According to the tree huggers the arsenic is now showing up in rice and we are doomed.

The FDA says the arsenic levels are well within acceptable limits but the media agrees we're doomed.
 
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Old 09-19-12, 06:11 PM
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["B]Dick, I remember fish on friday. Grew up around a lot of catholics, they always ate fish on friday. Do they still do that? I don't remember the school making any provisions for catholics on friday but most of them went to catholic schools anyway.[/B]"

Mark - I grew up Catholic and I grew up with mandatory fish on Friday. Ever heard the term "Mackeral Snapper" used to describe a Catholic? I hated fish Friday. It was dictated by the Pope. The church finally conceded it was pretty dumb and did away with it in the 70's(?).
Now we try to eat fish at least once a week becasue we like it - guess which day we usually have fish for dinner.

BTW - All of my grandkids go to Catholic schools. Expensive, especially when you consider that you still have to pay taxes to support the struggling public schools. In my area the few remaining Catholic schools are head and shoulders above public school when it comes to academics, discipline, morals etc. and there are no stabbings, no gunfire, no drugs, no gangs - just a bunch of kids wanting to learn and teachers wanting to teach.
 
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Old 09-19-12, 06:21 PM
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Droop - My grandson has carried an epipen in his back pack for years. Before that it was in his diaper bag. He was diagnosed with a peanut allergy at age 2. He developed a rash and my daughter eventually took him to an allergist.

My point, which I probably failed to make, is that the overwhelming majority of food allergies cause less than catastrophic (anaphyactic shock) reactions.

Here is an excerpt from a WIKIPEDIA article on peanut allergy.

"The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America estimates that peanut allergy is one of the most common causes of food-related death.[13] However, there is an increasing body of medical opinion that, while there definitely are food sensitivities, the dramatic rise in frequency of nut allergies and more particularly the measures taken in response to the threat show elements of mass psychogenic illness, hysterical reactions grossly out of proportion to the level of danger:[14] "Dr. Christakis points out that about 3.3 million Americans are allergic to nuts, and even more — 6.9 million — are allergic to seafood. But of 30 million hospitalizations each year, just 2,000 are due to food allergies, and about 150 people die annually from serious allergic food reactions. That’s the same number of people killed by bee stings and lightning strikes combined. . . . . he writes." Media sensationalism has also been blamed.[15]

Take note of the bolded section. Also consider the number of people that die from all food allergies each year is the same as people that die from lightning and bee stings.
Again, the real problem is that the medicle profession is unable or unwilling to quantify an individual's risk so parents and allergy sufferers are left with a choice - buy an epipen and lobby for a peanut ban or take the risk. My point is the risk is almost miniscule.

Dick - The statistics from the CDC do not support your comment that the peanut problem is serious. All food allergies account for less than 0.007% of hospitalizations. The food allergy death number is so small that it is negligable. In comparison 2,000 children die every year by drowning.
 
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Old 09-19-12, 09:46 PM
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Well I know a way where you can have control over what the school feeds your child. Home school them LOL. No school saying your son is suspended for dumping the mandated fruit in the trash and not eating it or bringing a banned lunch to school etc.
 
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Old 09-20-12, 04:44 AM
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Just had a school lunch Tuesday with our son for Take Dad to School (lunch) week. He's the pickiest eater on the planet, so has always carried his own. I had a grilled cheese sandwich, baked cinnamon apples, salad, watermelon cup, and milk - $3 and change. The alternate entree was a turkey taco and they also had pizza. You're also allowed to brown-bag anything you want - Wendy's, Mickey D's, Subway, KFC, even Chick-Fil-A. They use a pin # system and you put money in their account online. Visitors pay cash.

Guess the politically-correct menu hasn't filtered down here yet. Oh, and nobody's sued the school system yet over using the word "Dad": Rhode Island school says dad-daughter dances violate law | Fox News
 
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Old 09-20-12, 05:42 PM
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So one parent ruins it for everyone else
 

Last edited by Gunguy45; 09-20-12 at 05:51 PM. Reason: Off topic...PM me if there's an issue...this was mostly about food...thx.
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Old 09-20-12, 06:13 PM
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Wayne - I think maybe I misunderstood what you meant was overhyped. I don't think the general situation of how many people have a peanut allergy is serious. I think that having a peanut allergy is serious.

I know that the reaction my sister and nephew had to peanuts was severe vomiting and an emergency room visit. I know the severe reaction my nephew had to peanuts was his second and was far worse than his first. This is not uncommon to occur when someone is allergic to something. My sister is in her 20's now and had to go the emergency room because of a reaction within the last 2 years.
 
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Old 09-21-12, 04:58 AM
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Ya, food allergies don't affect many people but can be serious for those it does. My wife and her kids have all kinds of allergies, including food allergies. My wife and her oldest son are allergic to chocolate. My wife loves chocolate and could eat it up to about 20 yrs ago. Then she had chocolate one day and wound up at the ER an hour later. A week after they told her she couldn't eat chocolate anymore she stopped at a fast food and got a chocolate milk shake - back to the ER. She's never made that mistake since.

She has another son who is lactose intolerant and allergic to shell fish. Consuming dairy products keeps him in the bath rm and shell fish makes him drunk. My wife and all 3 of her kids have asthma. I assume food allergies are genetic.
 
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Old 09-21-12, 04:11 PM
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Lactose intolerance isn't an allergy. It's actually fairly odd that a large percentage of adult human populations can still digest milk after weening.

It has yet to be ruled conclusive, but there has been a lot of study between the relationship of tylenol use in young children and asthma. It seems tylenol use by the mother during pregnancy and use by young children greatly increases the risk of asthma in the child.
 
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Old 09-21-12, 05:05 PM
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Droo.....I still drink milk, bout a gallon a week...though my wife still gives me looks when we are at a nicer place and I order it. I'm almost 55. As a kid I probably drank 1/2+ gallon a day. Maybe cause I never quit doing it? That was a staple of a Navy meal. One of the few things they didn't restrict your servings.

Step-son can't eat real cheese, yogurt, ice cream, etc...unless he does a lactaid thing. I guess it's what critters you keep alive in your gut?
 
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Old 09-21-12, 06:24 PM
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I think it's largely genetics and has nothing to do with critters in your gut. People that are lactose intolerant do not produce enough of the enzyme lactase. That is what digests lactose. So when you don't have that enzyme and you drink milk, well, things get all loosey goosey. And its not like everyone who is lactose intolerant produces no lactase. They can produce some, but not enough to digest a large amount of milk. I noticed that with myself. I can't consume a large amount of dairy without having a problem. In moderation, things are just fine.
 
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Old 09-21-12, 11:52 PM
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I don't think the school should have a say in what you pack for your child. Why can't you pack a PBJ sandwich. Are they afraid the child might trade it with a kid that is allergic? enforce a no sharing policy.
 
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Old 09-22-12, 07:07 AM
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But step-son drank milk, ate ice cream, cheese, etc all the way until he was about 15 or so...then started having the issue...just seems odd to this massive milk drinker. Of course I pretty much have an iron gut....street food all over the world and have never been sick from it.
 
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Old 09-22-12, 08:55 AM
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"I don't think the school should have a say in what you pack for your child. Why can't you pack a PBJ sandwich. Are they afraid the child might trade it with a kid that is allergic? enforce a no sharing policy."

There are a couple of problems with that. First is the obvious. The school must have a say about what foods can be consumed on their premises. It's about liability and little to do with allergies. What if a kid brings a PBJ for lunch at a school that has no restrictions, trades it with another kid for a balony and cheese and the other kid gets seriously ill? While the odds may be large, if the sick kid's parents had informed the school about his/her allergy and the school effectively ignored them then there would likely be legal reprecussions.

Secondly, how do you enforce "no trading" with 6 year olds? In my area some schools enforce a ban but most simply impose some safeguards - like a peanut free table and peanut free snacks.

As I posted earlier the dangers from serious illness (requiring hospitalization) and fatalities from peanut alleregies are remote and greatly over hyped but as other posters had commented the risk
does exist and in a sue happy society, school administrators can't afford to ignore that risk.
 
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Old 09-22-12, 09:19 AM
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I've also seen in our local system that children are not allowed to carry an epi-pen....like all other prescriptions they must be kept in the "nurses" office. (I quoted nurses, because I don't think they are all RNs) Since the whole point of an epi-pen is immediate treatment, I'm not sure even a few min delay is acceptable.
 
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Old 09-22-12, 12:43 PM
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Ya, my grandson has asthma and has to check his inhaler in at the office every morning when he gets to school It was on the news awhile back that they suspended a little girl because she gave her inhaler to a friend that was having an asthma attack on the school bus. It was covered by the school boards illegal drug policy

Vic, I used to have an iron gut but I think it rusted out a few yrs back
 
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Old 09-22-12, 03:55 PM
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Vic - Another of the bennies - monkey meat on a stick!

Of course most of the street food I consumed was pickled by the time it got to my stomach.
 
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Old 09-22-12, 04:40 PM
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There are a couple of problems with that. First is the obvious. The school must have a say about what foods can be consumed on their premises. It's about liability and little to do with allergies. What if a kid brings a PBJ for lunch at a school that has no restrictions, trades it with another kid for a balony and cheese and the other kid gets seriously ill? While the odds may be large, if the sick kid's parents had informed the school about his/her allergy and the school effectively ignored them then there would likely be legal reprecussions.

OK then how about not forcing the kids to eat the schools healthy foods if they don't want to. why should a kid be suspended cause he she does not like apples or bananas etc. that's not right saying you eat this apple whether you like it or not or you will be sent home is not right. But what if all the kid eats is PBJ and down right refuses to eat anything else. Does that give the school the right to throw the kids lunch away and send him home saying you need to make your kid something else.
 
  #37  
Old 09-26-12, 06:00 AM
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Must have been a long time back since any of my kids where in school. Certainly before food bans where in place. And way back in the "Stone" age when I was in school. Obesity wasn't even a common or commonly heard word back then. And very few Fat Kids best as I can recall.

But I am inclined to agree, back then, some 50+ years ago, us kids had far more athletic abilities because we where far more active during and after school. We did not have any electronic media, computers, IPads, cell phone with texting, I Books and all the other sit on your A S S texting, chatting or reading down loadable books, playing video games, etc etc etc.

All we had was black and white TV and radio. So we kids played outdoors weather permitting or gathered at a friends house and played board games or an indoor physical activity. Bottom line was as kids we where far more active then any kid is now. Snow to shovel, gardens to tend to and lawns to mow, if there wasn't anything else to do...

And we had access to lots of "Junk" foods back then too. Difference was parental control over junks foods, how often and how much so called Junk foods we could have. Rarely a family dinner meal without a desert to follow. Home baked deserts wasn't a treat. It was common place except maybe for ice cream.......Yet we kids where not fat and certainly not much in the way as any obesity problems like todays kids. Obesity wasn't a word we even heard of back then...

School lunch's where great too. No Junk foods heated in a micro wave to serve over a counter or in a veding machine nor canned foods nor any prepared heat and eat junk foods. Cafeteria personal cooked it all. Parents volunteered to help and costs where low.

My 2 cents.

Excuse me. I have active work to due.....HA HA...BYE BYE.....
 
  #38  
Old 09-26-12, 11:28 AM
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I also grew up with home made deserts after dinner most nights. Yet I didn't know any "obese" kids. The current definition of obese is a BMI of 30 or more. I wonder what the definition was 30-40 years ago?

Sometimes I think the obesity "epidemic" isn't too distant from the asthma, allergy, autism, ADD epidemics we are currently experiencing. Maybe it's more closely related to money than it is to health.
 
  #39  
Old 09-26-12, 11:56 AM
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I can remember 3 or 4 of my peers in school who were what most people would call fat. 2 of them were also strong as oxes and one played center on our football team. No one used inhalers or had epi-pens (not that they probably were around then).

I think there have been studies done that show the more children are exposed to possible allergens the less likely they are to develop allergies later in life. Since I grew up in a farming community, almost everyone had livestock, dogs, cats, fields of crops. No special air filters, no water filters, nothing like that.

Anyone could have a glandular problem...or some other issue that wasn't known about back then....but overall...kids were healthier in the 60's and 70's...imo.
 
  #40  
Old 09-26-12, 02:07 PM
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Ya, I think the fat kids back when I was in school would be considered just slightly overweight today. I suspect the main reason was the lack of processed foods and both work or play was physically active. I was shocked when my grandson told me that phys ed was optional and then only a 6 [?] week coarse

I never knew any kids that had asthma back them but my wife said she had it from the time she was a small child. She was always sick as a child and sometime after becoming an adult a doctor told her she had asthma and how to treat it. She came from a large family and was the only one that had asthma..... but all 3 of her kids and a couple of nieces do
 
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