Turkey day poll

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  #1  
Old 11-18-12, 12:48 PM
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Turkey day poll

Oven roasted, fried or something else?
 
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  #2  
Old 11-18-12, 01:29 PM
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Maybe homemade tacos......either that or Golden Corral.

Makes no sense for us to even cook a small bird for just the two of us. And what good would a bird be w/o all the other stuff. Since I'm the cook....not worth the effort.

If I can find a good ham at a not ridiculous price I'll think about that since it freezes well and has so many other uses.
 
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Old 11-18-12, 02:05 PM
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Chicken fried steak.

.
 
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Old 11-18-12, 02:16 PM
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Baked a turkey yesterday. Going out to a local restaurant with friends on Thursday. Turkey will last the two of us a while. Good for sandwiches for work. Maybe some turkey tacos
 
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Old 11-18-12, 04:02 PM
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My wife will bake the turkey in the oven like she always does....... but with all the kids [and who they bring] I'm lucky to get a week's worth of leftovers.
 
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Old 11-18-12, 04:06 PM
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Oven. Leftovers are for the weak!
 
  #7  
Old 11-18-12, 04:52 PM
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Oven roasted..........(someone caught licking the turkey)
 
  #8  
Old 11-18-12, 07:05 PM
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I won't be having turkey (our national bird according to Ben Franklin) this year. Normally, it is roasted uncovered in an oven (traditional style). No warmed up left-overs for several days, but I do enjoy a good sandwich the day after Thanksgiving. - Sliced turkey on toast with lettuce, onion, mayo and mustard.

This year I will be starting a government training/retraining course in Washington for a 6 day class for damage verification (hurricane Sandy) that starts at 8:00 AM on Thanksgiving day. - Lunch will be brought in and we will have to pay cash for what is found. I don't think will be turkey, but maybe from Mac and Don's Supper Club (McDonald's) down the street.

Dick
 
  #9  
Old 11-18-12, 11:24 PM
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We are going to have a Harrington Ham through the mail my mom wanted to try it so I hope it will be good. We usually go to Boston Market and eat there since it is just me and my mom since my dad passed on several years ago and I must say Boston Market is cheap and the food tastes good too. I have done the turkey route a couple of times or so both in a conventional oven and the microwave and it is just too much work especially for just two people. I thought about frying a turkey but then also heard about some of the dangers too so I never used the thing that we bought for doing one indoors. Going to get a good frozen pumpkin pie from our organic grocer later on. I bought some stuffing and other things too that we like so we can take our pick of things.
 
  #10  
Old 11-19-12, 03:12 AM
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Rotisserie Here....have been doing it this way for several years. Have overly impressed some friends when we have had dinner parties. It will be a small gathering so we don't need a huge bird. We have one of those rotisseries you used to see advertised on the late night TV (although I did not order it off the infomercial). I highly recommend to all that this item makes great chicken, turkey, lamb and kebobs....Of course, I have my secret rubs for all the different meats.

Whats funny is that I purchased the rotisserie at a thrift store for $10, it had never been used, parts still wrapped in plastic. Figured what the heck, I asked the clerk if I could plug it in, it immediately started to get hot so I bought it. Probably the best $10 I ever spent.
 
  #11  
Old 11-19-12, 04:16 AM
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You know the father in "A Christmas Story"? That's me. Only this year will probably have turkey post T-Day. We're picking up Grandma and driving cross state for dinner at daughter's place and she's not proficient enough at cooking for a turkey, so it'll be ham & fixings.

Usually oven-roasted in a bag on a rack in the roasting pan.
 
  #12  
Old 11-19-12, 05:20 AM
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Although our thanksgiving has come and gone, I figured I'd pipe in here.
We recently picked up a turkey deepfryer. Pending conditions and arrangements, it'll either be roasted or deepfried now for us. Thanksgiving was deepfried, Christmas will be oven roasted.
 
  #13  
Old 11-19-12, 07:00 AM
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We have fried our Thanksgiving turkeys ever since we were introduced to that method in South Carolina years ago. However, this year it's back to the oven. The cost of peanut oil is outrageous (nearly twice the cost of the turkey) and we don't fry enough to reuse the oil. I have to say that IMO no other method of preparing the bird can touch frying. Mike - a word of caution - fry the bird outside, wear protective clothes and be very mindful of how much oil is in the pot.

I always buy a bird bigger than we need because for me the leftovers are the best part. A big chunk of toasted, crusty bread mounded with stuffing and covered with turkey all smothered with homemade turkey gravy.
 
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Old 11-19-12, 07:31 AM
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Mike - a word of caution - fry the bird outside, wear protective clothes and be very mindful of how much oil is in the pot.
I know. I had seen it done once or twice before we did our first bird. The unit I have is propane, so it gets placed in the middle of the gravel driveway when it use.
Welding gloves work great for this.

Just make sure the bird is not frozen and really, really well dried. Any water will cause the grease to splash.

When done, I'll strain the oil while putting it back into the container it came in.
 
  #15  
Old 11-19-12, 09:08 AM
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Traditional oven toasted this year at my sons house. With kids and grand kids, a big bird with all of the fixings does well. With the extra birds in the freezer I will experiment throughout the year.

Leftovers in a turkey stew is a favorite. I will try a turkey pot pie after the holidays.

Bud
 
  #16  
Old 11-19-12, 09:56 AM
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Well....found out an hour ago that I have to change my answer. NOW DW decides she wants turkey and some of the old standards. Guess I'll be hitting the stores later today and the ham will have to wait for Christmas.
 
  #17  
Old 11-19-12, 09:57 AM
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Oven roasted, with stuffing. Still alive, too!
 
  #18  
Old 11-19-12, 10:04 AM
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Oven roasted, with stuffing. Still alive, too!
How do you keep the oven door closed with a live bird?

In our house, regardless how the turkey is cooked, traditional (stove top and/or in the bird) stuffing is mandatory.
 
  #19  
Old 11-19-12, 11:22 AM
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I know they say stuffing the bird can be a health risk but that's the way my Mom always did it and it was soooo good. I can't duplicate hers, so I do it in a separate dish in the oven.
 
  #20  
Old 11-19-12, 11:31 AM
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The only way it's a health risk, is if the bird isn't cooked long enough. New cooks (or bad cooks, lol) may not be good at judging. I can't eat meat unless it's well done, so I don't have that problem.
 

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  #21  
Old 11-19-12, 12:01 PM
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We stuff the bird just like my mother did and her mother before her. No one ever got sick. However, unlike them I use a meat thermometer. I like my tuna raw, steak rare, and turkey well done.

Mike, I also fry in the driveway. I tried it once on the deck and the grease splattered over. I ended up replacing several deckboards because no matter what I did they kept getting moldy.
 
  #22  
Old 11-19-12, 12:25 PM
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Turkey at the daughter's home. Don't care how she cooks it as long as there is some raisin dressing for me.
 
  #23  
Old 11-19-12, 12:47 PM
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Turkey at the daughter's home. Don't care how she cooks it as long as there is some raisin dressing for me.
Raisin dressing?
Never heard of it.
 
  #24  
Old 11-19-12, 02:19 PM
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Well as I said I am not going to be cooking a turkey but I have some tips for you guys brine the turkey in salt water and place it in a pan with a rack so the turkey does touch the bottom of the pan this according to Americas Test Kitchen. Here is a link to a video about braised turkey and how to make it Video: A Slow and Easy Thanksgiving - America's Test Kitchen courtesy of Americas Test Kitchen. You can see this recipe and others that they air for free online. It is one of my favorite shows that I could watch all day if I didn't have other things to do.
 
  #25  
Old 11-19-12, 09:17 PM
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We are going to do the usual. Easy clean up. 99 cents each.
 
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  #26  
Old 11-19-12, 10:50 PM
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Looks good, Mike. I'm going to have a peanut butter and grizzleberry sandwich.
 
  #27  
Old 11-20-12, 04:46 AM
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Golly Mike, did the admiral go on strike?
Back in my younger years I spent a lot of thanksgiving days alone and would have a turkey tv dinner or pot pie but now the only time I eat a tv dinner is when my wife is at work and there aren't any leftovers in the fridge
 
  #28  
Old 11-20-12, 05:22 AM
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Geez Mike! Should at least do Boston Market! Don't you have one near you?
 
  #29  
Old 11-20-12, 05:35 AM
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I am the turkey cooker in my family. We have Thanksgiving at my inlaws, which is a smaller family and I always deep fry. I have a 17 lb fresh Amish Turkey that I will rub with salt, pepper, and spices both inside and outside the skin, then inject the bird with cajun butter before it goes into the hot oil.

For Christmas, I cook for my family and it is a big family and I need a bigger turkey than will fit in my fryer. I usually get the biggest turkey I can find, then soak it overnight in a brine of salt, sugar, peppercorns, garlic, and various other spices. Then the next day I roast it in an electric roaster with a lot of fresh herbs. Under and inside the turkey I put onions, leeks, garlic, bay leaves, carrots, fresh sprigs of oregano, thyme, rosemary, chives and other stuff I cannot remember right now. (I have it written down somewhere). None of this stuff is eaten after the turkey is cooked. It is just used to add flavor and moisture to the bird. I also rub this turkey with salt, pepper, and spices and drip melted butter and cut up chives all over the turkey. This results in the most tender, juicy turkey you will ever eat. My family raves about it every year. It also makes the best tasting gravy you will ever eat.
 
  #30  
Old 11-20-12, 05:51 AM
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Welcome to the forums arcdude but your post is making me hungry and I've already had breakfast
 
  #31  
Old 11-20-12, 11:09 AM
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Arcdude - When we have a lot of people for turkey dinner I used to buy two small (10-12 lb) birds. The great thing about frying the turkey is that it doesn't take hours. While one is resting and waiting to be carved the other one would be cooking.

Mark, I haven't heard the term "TV dinners" in years. I remember when they first came out my mother thought they were the greatest thing. Right up there with sliced bread. No cooking, no dishes and no complaints about not getting what you wanted. That didn't last long though when we all realized that it just wasn't as good as Mom's home cooking.
 
  #32  
Old 11-20-12, 01:53 PM
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I haven't heard the term "TV dinners" in years
Do they call them something else nowadays? I know the aluminum tray is gone but they are still about the same thing. they were back then.
 
  #33  
Old 11-20-12, 09:33 PM
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We haven't had turkey in over 20 years. With just 3 of us for family holidays, and none of us big meat eaters, I imagine a 1# canned ham will suffice nicely. I'd be just as happy with a Big Mac and fries as all the traditional Thanksgiving menu hoopla.
 
  #34  
Old 11-21-12, 03:23 AM
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I thought since we were talking about turkeys I would include a picture of one Happy Thanksgiving everyone!
 
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