What do you make of all the recent firearm incidents?

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  #1  
Old 12-18-12, 11:23 AM
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What do you make of all the recent firearm incidents?

I know this is a controversial topic. There have been ....what.....six or seven incidents in the last 10 days or so including death, injury, gun threats, an exposed plot, random shooting in a public place? I think a lot of this is attributed to failures in the mental health system, and aggressive marketing of and overuse of unproven medications with dangerous side effects.

But some have another theory. Since at least the 1950's governments and intelligence agencies have studied or experimented with behavioral modification, and mind control. Do any of you think that some of these incidents are engineered to make the public more accepting of a plan to disarm the population? I am more likely to believe this is caused by decline of our society and its related institutions. But then again, I think are government is capable of anything.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-18-12, 11:58 AM
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I should have bitten my tongue - but I didn't so I changed the text since I couldn't figure out how to delete.
 
  #3  
Old 12-18-12, 12:10 PM
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It doesn't have to be mind control or anything explicitly illegal. All the G needs to do to advance an agenda is get the gullible, totally lazy media to run the garbage "news" stories they feed them and we'll all believe the world is crumbling and need help from the nanny state. Bad things happen all the time--all the media needs to do is report ALL of it, with a little spin and opinion laying blame where there's no proof.
 
  #4  
Old 12-18-12, 12:47 PM
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Although government agencies testing drugs and other means of on humans have been proven to take place way back in the day (and maybe even still happening), I won't get too into that subject.
The social engineering that guy48065 mentioned has also been proven, time and again by all forms of government (not just the US).

The direction I read this afternoon about restricting certain types of firearms or the "mega-clips" (30+ rounds) could (no guarantees) reduce the number of casualties, but it's not going to make the problem go away.

As an outsider (Canadian), I would say that the social acceptance and ease of access of arms is the bigger issue.
It kills me when I hear friends south of the border state they feel safer because their armed or they feel helpless when they come to Canada because they had to leave their weapons behind.

This article should drive my point home. It does get a bit bios at the end and is written by a Canadian news paper. The first part of the article does prove the point however.
American police officer writes letter to editor about lack of handguns in Canada
 

Last edited by Northern Mike; 12-18-12 at 12:59 PM. Reason: Spelling
  #5  
Old 12-18-12, 04:54 PM
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You're right, Mike, the article meanders quite a bit. He made a point. At least in a parking lot dispute no one dies.......unless one of the parties is an imbalanced armed person. Then there's nothing you can do....either in America or Canada.
This whole premise is based on "firearms". Why? Did no one read about the man in Florida who killed another with a hammer? Registering my hammer is not in my agenda, but the media didn't pick up on it very well.

There's no way I would live without protection. When seconds count.....Cops are only minutes away. Game over.
 
  #6  
Old 12-18-12, 05:24 PM
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Unfortunately, mass murders have been happening for quite some time. They are not new. What is new are the 24 hour "news" stations. Lots of people make millions of dollars exploiting these tragedies.

These events also draw out those looking to advance their agendas. The cause of these incidences are complex. There is no one single thing you can do to stop them, if they can be stopped. I recently read an article that said that the number of mass murders is actually down since 2000. The highest year recorded would be 1929. I wish I had the link handy, but I don't.

Even though it isn't highly discussed all the time on TV, this is an issue that has been researched for decades. Researchers have struggled to come up with possible solutions because of the complexity of the cause.

I think it is easy for a person (like myself) that lives in a populated area to say no one needs to a gun to protect themselves. My brother happens to live in a rural area with no local police protection. That means the state police are responsible. One night her hears an awful screaming come from the woods. It sounds like a child screaming for his dear life so he calls the police because he is unsure as to what it is. He explains to them what it sounds like to him. Thirty minutes later the police show up. If it takes 30 minutes for police to show up to a call of a "child being murdered in the woods", I would think owning a gun would be imperative for protection. Not everyone lives that far from a police response, but many do. I think they should have the means to deal with those who want to harm them effectively.

I don't own a gun, and I don't want to own a gun. That doesn't change the fact that they are tools that are useful for many reasons that are not evil in nature. Owning a gun is a serious responsibility and should be treated as such.

The most unfortunate thing is that after these new laws get jammed through Congress, people will forget about what happened and nothing would have been done to prevent the next one.

EDIT: Forgot to mention this tragedy from long ago: Bath School disaster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
  #7  
Old 12-18-12, 05:32 PM
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I am not going to state where or not I carry but I will say that in 62 years of life I have NEVER been in a situation where having a firearm would have made a positive difference. Others may have different experiences.
 
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Old 12-18-12, 05:49 PM
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Welcome to Atlanta. At the major trauma center in downtown, Grady Memorial, the nurses who work the emergency room and are apt to go out onto the ambulance receiving dock, MUST wear a flak jacket. If Leroy is being transported alive....Bubba is going to finish the job eventually. Different world. Good to be gone.
 
  #9  
Old 12-18-12, 05:52 PM
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I have a few friends that served in Vietnam and they put tinfoil in their hats. This is enough, in their opinion, to deter government control of their minds. Chip injected during the haircuts you know....

One of my Vietnam buds is doing life in a looney bin , or so we call it, to never get out. ( Cant say why)

But if you look back on the chemicals used in warfare and inoculations and such, I believe there is merit in humans having brain influxes not with in their control, and also past on through DNA to the children.

Whats a human life worth????? We are all expendable, No?

Just my opinion though..... Only because of my age group and around these people most of my life, I could write a book with many stories of conspiracy....
 
  #10  
Old 12-18-12, 06:00 PM
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I believe there is merit in humans having brain influxes not with in their control
Yeah, like putting a 19 year old in charge of a Huey flying 60 feet off the ground into a hot LZ. A buddy of mine did that. He's still a little touchy at times. Pull up from an LZ and villagers are holding onto your skids. Your job is to protect the aircraft at all cost. You have buzzers going off. What are your options? Unbelievable stress for someone who can't even drink a beer, legally.

I'm not a conspiracy theorist, so I don't think the G is smart enough to enter into mind control. You must have one good mind to use as a basic criterion, and that doesn't exist in Washington
 
  #11  
Old 12-18-12, 08:26 PM
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In my opinion I don't really want a gun and I have no need for one. I have seen upfront what a rifle can do to your brains after a neighbor killed himself. That being said though for those who are in their right mind I think that they should have the right to carry a fire arm for protection. After all even if guns are taken away there can still be mass murders. Just remember what American indians used to say that a man with a knife could kill a thousand people in one night. That isn't being disparaging towards American indians it is just part of history like the history of the Bath School drooplug mentioned. So there are many ways to kill a person and unfortunately for some people with mental illness many ways these people will turn their killing into a hunting game. I once heard a quote on Criminal Minds that people are the only animals who kill for sport unlike the wolf who hunts only because he is hungry. Very sad but unfortunately at least for the mentally ill very true.
 
  #12  
Old 12-27-12, 07:06 PM
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Yes I have heard of people that hated guns because of a bad experience. I respect that. I have a few guns. I occasionally go target shooting. But it seems the older I get, the less interested I am in firearms. I guess in the last few years, I have been re-evaluating my own belief system regarding firearms. I can't deny that over zealous acts of self defense played a part in this. Recreational shooting will most likely occupy a very small corner of my life. I will always keep my firearms. But to tell you the truth, I would rather devise a home security or self-defense plan using stun gun/taser first, and gun use more selectively.

I think gun owners should be required to take a course in topics such as gun safety, gun laws and statutes regarding use of deadly force. Does it make too much sense? I would gladly do this. I know there are gun advocates that are much more interested in firearms than I am. And I still support their right to own firearms as long a they are law abiding, responsible, and mentally competent. But I think we need some serious gun control legislation, and that's where we might disagree.
 

Last edited by bluesbreaker; 12-27-12 at 07:22 PM.
  #13  
Old 12-27-12, 07:57 PM
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As I recall we had over two thousand gun laws a decade ago and I suspect even more today. While I AM in favor of requiring gun owners to pass competency requirements I am unable to see such laws as having any real effect upon gun related deaths. The plain simple truth is that most gun related deaths are from criminals and by definition criminals do NOT obey laws.

My stand is unpopular but I am all in favor of making capital punishment far, far easier and to apply it to a far greater range of crimes. We often read of the high cost of applying capital punishment, from the original trial, through the appeals, the higher cost if incarceration on death row and such but in reality the cost per citizen is infinitesimal. I AM bothered by the very real possibility, even probability of executing an innocent person but I also think that possibility can be greatly reduced. In my opinion there are people (I use the term loosely) that just plain do not deserve to live. These criminals refuse to obey the rules of a civilized society and as far as I am concerned by doing so they forfeit their right to live in a civilized society. There is no chance of the human race becoming extinct so that cannot be used as an excuse.

I have never shot another human being in my life but I guarantee that if I had my weapon available and some low-life broke down my door I would blow him/her away. I don't care WHY they are breaking into my house, drug problems or what and I don't care if they are forty years old or fourteen, if they break down my door they are dead. I feel the same way if I am accosted on the street or the road, try to harm me and you are dead if it is at all possible on my part.
 
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Old 12-28-12, 07:22 AM
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Furd, your "unpopular" stand on capital punishment is echoed here. The do good after-the-fact organizations that find these people innocent 20 years down the road should have been doing their job during the trial phase. You'll get so much flak regarding post innocence in capital punishment. Some even say it isn't a deterrent to crime. Bet. You execute a child molester/murderer, it instantly deters crime, IMO. He/she won't do it again. In Georgia, long ago, we had capital punishment for murder, rape, arson, even armed robbery. Now, most of these people are released early to make "room" for the prisons. Capital punishment takes care of that, too.

Case in point. Bobby Issacs and his brother Carl were convicted of killling the Ned Alday family (entire family) in South Georgia. He served 21 years. Total misuse of justice. Carl was executed in 2003.
 
  #15  
Old 12-28-12, 07:23 AM
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Well, there are many cases of people displaying or using guns when it wasn't necessary. A lawyer in my home state said people are constantly getting in trouble this way. So they pay him thousands to defend them against weapons charges. Maybe if they were better informed about gun laws they'd think twice. I do agree that some people have regressed to animals and predators and are a waste of life.
 
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Old 01-07-13, 02:40 PM
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Thought this was interesting:

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  #17  
Old 01-07-13, 02:55 PM
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Not to get off subject but Larrys pic reminded me of something. Could technology and education have a cause and effect on peoples minds?

Maybe our antiqued infrastructure is education. My kids go to school and I can tell you its really lacking....We are producing a bunch of dummy's with smart phones....

Purely my opinion.....
 
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  #18  
Old 01-07-13, 04:50 PM
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But antiques are worth more money!!!
 
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Old 01-07-13, 05:11 PM
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Although I agree with the basic premise.......the trains shown from other countries are almost all hi-speed point to point. And I mean point to point of about 150 miles or so (IIRC).

The US system was mostly designed for freight. Our country is 10 times larger than most of the examples. Who travels from LA to Detroit (for instance) and has to be there quickly? No one. Boston to NYC...different story.

Btw...the US does have some hi speed lines mostly in the East Coast corridor.
 
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Old 01-07-13, 05:16 PM
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Coast to coast fast???? Delta is ready when you are! We fly, we don't ride trains coast to coast. I'd venture to say those foreign trains couldn't pull fly through a keyhole compared to the big boy!
 
  #21  
Old 01-07-13, 05:31 PM
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Btw...the US does have some hi speed lines mostly in the East Coast corridor.
That would be one high speed line and it isn't nearly as fast as the European high speed lines.
 
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Old 01-08-13, 03:35 AM
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And it only services Washington DC area (go figure)to Daytona Beach FL, IIRC. With stops at every city in between, just like Greyhound.
 
  #23  
Old 01-08-13, 07:29 AM
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Actually I was talking about the Acela Express, DC to Boston. True, not as fast as most of the others mentioned...but that's mostly due to infrastructure limitations. Even with that, they are the only profitable Amtrak service and have 75% of the NY-DC travel market share.
 
  #24  
Old 01-08-13, 02:01 PM
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75% of the NY-DC travel market share
Yep, politicians and lawyers Makes you wonder about the porkbarrel legislation that got it built.
 
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