tough grinder that can grind up rubber

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  #1  
Old 12-20-12, 05:55 PM
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tough grinder that can grind up rubber

Like rubber tire type rubber which is pretty tough stuff. Any kind of grinder that can grind that up into small chunks?
 
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Old 12-21-12, 03:28 AM
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...or maybe a coarse sanding disk. Can you tell us more about the job you need to do?
 
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Old 12-21-12, 03:47 AM
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Don't forget most tires are belted with stainless steel, and will be very difficult to cut. Your final product (whatever that is) may not be what you expect. I have a feeling you are wanting this for a playground base or driveway. We'll wait for an answer.
 
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Old 12-21-12, 05:59 AM
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Go to you tube and type in "tire shredding".
 
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Old 12-21-12, 11:25 AM
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I gave rubber tires as an example of rubber that I want to grind up. I could use bicyle tire rubber or other rubber for my purposes. What I want it for is to use on the shoes that I am resoling. Its kind of hard to understand because its hard to explain how I am trying to do it and the project would have to be drawn to see it.
 
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Old 12-21-12, 11:33 AM
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Nope, old hat stuff. We used to make sandals out of tire treads back in the 60's. Are you melting the rubber after you grind it up?
 
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Old 12-21-12, 01:48 PM
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Thinking out loud...
I wonder if an old fashioned meat grinder would chew up rubber and spit it out?
 
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Old 12-21-12, 02:38 PM
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Not sure, but I've seen the process for retreading truck tires and they grind off the outside layers (above the steel belts) and glue on some new tread. What they do with the material they grind off I do not know. Just a thought.

Bud
 
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Old 12-21-12, 04:15 PM
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Ok, I was going to post this in the "I did it myself" section, but since there is an active thread, I will post it here.

I have a older pair of Rocky Cornstalkers. These were wonderful boots and very comfortable. However, if you do a little online research, you will find that whatever they used for the soles had a shelf life. Even though they were not used every day (I used mine maybe 7-10 days a year) the soles started falling apart. I did some looking online, and stopped by a local shoe repair shop, and found it would cost about $70-80 to resole them. Not worth it when you can buy new ones for about the same price. So, I did some looking online for a DIY re-sole option. I found a video on youtube that showed some guys re-soleing some boots with tire treads.

Here is how I did it:
Find a tire tread on the side of the road.
Using a multi-tool (like a Fein) fitted with a smooth (no teeth) straight blade, clamp a section of tire in a bench vice and start cutting with the multi tool. Cut so that the blade just skims over the steel belts. If you go too deep, and into the belts, you will dull your blade in a hurry. I did ok and only had to sharpen the blade once. Took me about 45 min to get a section of tread per boot.

Next, glue the sole onto your cleaned boot. Do not cut the tread to size and leave it over-sized. I used Shoe Goop but another suggestion I found on the net was to use contact cement. I think the contact cement may have worked better, as the Shoe Goop need to dry, where the contact cement would have instant grab. I ended to have to use a bunch of clamps to hole it tight to the bottom of the boot.

Lastly, I cut the extra tread off the boot using, again, the straight blade in the multi-tool. I still did not cut it perfect and just used a belt sander to sand off the extra. It smells a bit but, I did not have to sand too much off and it cut fairly close.

Here are some pictures of the final project:




This was likely more than you wanted to hear, but all you need is a belt sander. The only thing I want to change is to add a heal. They are a little flat.

Here is the video I watched:
How to convert winter tires to boot soles - YouTube
 
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