My Renovation.

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  #41  
Old 03-21-13, 01:51 PM
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1. So how thick is the least amount?

2. Are you in Zone 4, or 5, see cities below the map; Chapter 11 - Energy Efficiency

Appears you are under both "I" Codes, lol. New Jersey Building Codes

And the energy code of IECC 2009, R-38 ceiling, R-13, 20 for walls; Chapter 4 - Residential Energy Efficiency

How did they let you use 5-1/2" rafters only? The perm on some closed-cell 2# SPF is 1.51 per 1" thick. At 5-1/2" thick, it would be a Class 1 vapor barrier, but not at 3" thick; http://www.certainteed.com/resources/30-50-024.pdf Your closest city and foam thickness I need for your relative humidity in the room to figure...

Gary
PS R-15 or R-20, location?; IRC FAQ: Conditioned Attics — Building Science Information
 
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  #42  
Old 03-21-13, 06:01 PM
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My house was built in 1928. That's how I have 2x6 rafters. The building department has no problem with my 3" of CCSF.

I am in zone 4. The minimum 2" for vapor retarder requirement is information I read on buildingscience.com. Perhaps other products perform differently.
 
  #43  
Old 03-21-13, 08:50 PM
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In Zone 4, you will be fine. No interior vapor barriers/retarders or mirrors (on the ceiling?) to create a vapor sandwich. lol...

Gary
 
  #44  
Old 03-22-13, 05:53 AM
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HAH!. Nope, none of those will be installed.
 
  #45  
Old 04-05-13, 08:43 AM
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Well I have sanded my joint compound and started painting. It's not as nice as I would like it, but also not terrible. Man, sanding that stuff is awful. I hope I get it on better the next round. The room really looks nice with a coat of paint on it. It really lights up nicely. I still have to get my mill work made and installed. I'll try to get some pics up later.
 
  #46  
Old 04-05-13, 10:27 AM
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Now you know why I'd rather put on an extra coat of mud than sand
Once you get better at applying the mud you can probably switch to a wet sponge
 
  #47  
Old 04-21-13, 06:47 PM
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drooplug how is your renovation going? Will be interesting to see some more pictures. I have enjoyed seeing your renovation.
 
  #48  
Old 04-25-13, 05:35 AM
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I'm almost done with the first room. I'll take some pictures when I get it done. At least to the 99% point. I'll have some things I will need to come back to later.

Right now I have an old window that I am stripping lead paint out of the jambs.
 
  #49  
Old 04-25-13, 03:47 PM
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I never stripped paint off a window before but have done my share of furniture stripping and don't want to do any more of that. Windows I know from watching This Old House are smaller of course but a great deal harder to deal with. I put foam around our windows in the back addition on our house and that wasn't any fun either. Looking forward to your pictures and from what I have seen you have done a great job!
 
  #50  
Old 04-25-13, 04:37 PM
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I hate stripping paint as well, but I don't have much of a choice here. It is lead based paint and I don't need my kids exposed to that. I've been fairly lucky with lead paint in the house. It seems none of the interior paint has any lead in it. Only here at the window, and I assume all of the exterior paint. I've read that lead was mainly used in exterior paint. So you will most commonly find it on the outside of the house and on the windows. That seems to have held true here.

The woodwork in the house was stained and varnished from the outset, so that helps as well. The stuff that was painted was done more recently with latex paint.
 
  #51  
Old 04-26-13, 02:50 AM
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As far as I know, lead based paint was just as prevalent back in the day in interior paints as it was in exterior. Lead was only in oil base paints! never in latex. I forget how old you house is but it is possible that lead paint was used on the walls. Fortunately flat oil wall paint rarely peels and has likely been covered by latex paint many times insuring it's encapsulation. Shellac was likely used over your stain when the house was built.
 
  #52  
Old 04-26-13, 09:31 AM
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I forget where I read that about lead in exterior paints. I know lead paint is commonly found in interiors. My house was built in 1928. I did test all the paint in question. Where I am currently working is the second floor. It is a finished attic that was done in the 1950's. The paint on the walls tested negative for lead. As far as the downstairs, I have not tested the paint on the walls, only on the trim. I think most of the house was wallpapered for many many decades. So there is a chance that the paint is lead free. I don't have much worry about because I have no plans to disturb that.
 
  #53  
Old 04-26-13, 11:31 AM
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  #54  
Old 04-27-13, 08:41 AM
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Comparing the pictures from February to today, very nice! Wish I had even half your ambition.
 
  #55  
Old 04-27-13, 11:02 AM
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Thanks. My drywall skills need some improvement though. I am really happy with the base moulding I chose. I originally wanted something taller, but I didn't like the profiles in that height. What I chose looks real good. I still have to rehab the window and make a built-in for one of the walls. But that's going to be after I get the rest of the major renovation work done.
 
  #56  
Old 04-27-13, 04:07 PM
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I think everything looks great too and so are your drywall skills. I have done patch jobs of some fairly big spots but never anything like you did. I imagine I could if I had the time too and the space like in your house but I don't have much time to do a great deal around here and not any extra space. Are you going to add any air conditioning to the space? I think the insulation you added will keep the attic room cooler but it may still be a bit hot and stuffy during the summer. I have seen mini split systems installed in attic spaces like your space.
 
  #57  
Old 04-27-13, 04:11 PM
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The house has already been retrofitted with central a/c. It was poorly done. I'm hoping the insulation well help that.
 
  #58  
Old 04-27-13, 10:30 PM
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You don't have that much more to have to do then with air conditioning already being there. I would suggest sealing any leaks you find in the vents as you go along in your renovation with a duct mastic that you paint on and adding insulation to the ducts too. You might even be able to zone certain rooms after you get walls open with dampers you can buy from a heating and cooling supply retailer. Just a few thoughts I had from seeing Ask This Old House.
 
  #59  
Old 12-08-13, 05:33 PM
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It's been a looong time since I updated my renovation progress. This back room I was working on took forever to get done. Now I am taking a break because I need it, the holidays are here, and the weather is cold. I think I will move to the next room in February. We will see.

Anyway, we had a bout an inch of snow fall today so I decided go outside and take a look to see if I can see a difference on the roof between the areas I spray foamed vs. the areas I did not. And there is! I was a bit concerned about things because the rooms feel a bit cold. I think that is largely from cold by passing the new insulation. The renovated rooms had the thermal barrier moved completely to the roof line. The room that has yet to be redone, still has the thermo barrier at the ceiling of the room.

It's a bit hard to see because the pictures were taken in the dark, but you can see a difference in the snow on the roof.

In this picture, the roof to the left of the chimney was sprayed and the roof above the door. Beyond that, the roof has yet to be reinsulated.

IMG_0671 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
IMG_0672 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

In this one, the roof to the left of the valley was spray foamed and to the right was not. It's hard to tell, but near the top of the valley and on the left, I didn't spray those bays and you can see the difference there as well.

IMG_0673 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Again, you can see where I didn't spray a few bays near the top of the valley in this picture. Also, that little section of roof at th bottom I am unable to reach because it is in the first floor. I think some of that cavity filled with blown in cellulose when I had the walls done, but it looks like it isn't completely full.

IMG_0675 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
 
  #60  
Old 12-09-13, 12:23 AM
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Thanks for sharing Drooplug I can see the difference you are talking about there must have been plenty of street lighting when you took the pictures. We are in the process of remodeling too although we will have a general contractor do most of the work. Getting one of those Sterling Accord showers with the grab bars. I will be helping with some things like the wiring and helping to haul out trash and a few other things like some of the grout work.

So it will be busy for a while but something that is badly needed as my moms arthritis makes it hard for her to step high into a tub. Looking forward to seeing more renovation pictures of your house when you get a chance. I might post our renovation It depends on how much time I have.
 
  #61  
Old 04-15-14, 01:30 PM
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The downside to replacement windows:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/drooplug/13880058724/
 
  #62  
Old 04-15-14, 02:12 PM
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I agree there is a downside the mess that is made when new replacement windows are in but there certainly is an upside too a bit warmer room and less noise in your house too! Once you fix that ugly mess though no one will ever know and everything can go back to normal. Your work so far has been great drooplug.
 
  #63  
Old 04-15-14, 05:11 PM
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The mess is me gutting the room, not replacing the window. The downside is the in effective insulation they attempted to stuff into the sash pockets.
 
  #64  
Old 04-15-14, 09:09 PM
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For me I think the messiest renovation was our bathroom renovation but the windows were second on the list as in some rooms there were bits of broken glass on the floor. They never opened the walls on each side like your window installers did. Still with all of the mess though I am glad we did each project even though it costs us at least for the bathroom a good deal of money. Always too a good sense of satisfaction too when you do at least part of a project but in the end you are happiest when it is finished!
 
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