Bad >Incorrect< Terminology

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Old 02-04-13, 11:47 AM
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Thumbs down Bad >Incorrect< Terminology

Funny, just saw part of a CSI episode about an electrocution. They were constantly referring to 110V and 220V.

And this is a show that supposedly strives for accuracy?
 
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Old 02-04-13, 12:01 PM
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I haven't watched that show for several years but I've never been all that impressed by the accuracy of a TV show. Normally they're pretty good?
 
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Old 02-04-13, 12:26 PM
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Well, I can't vouch for accuracy of most stuff...I just remember reading articles when it started about how they tried to be as accurate as possible without telling people how to build bombs or poison people in real life.
 
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Old 02-04-13, 12:37 PM
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It drives my wife nuts to watch shows or movies with me.
She gives me crap all the time for picking apart stuff and pointing out how things do and don't work as they show it.
 
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Old 02-04-13, 01:26 PM
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Try watching the old McGyver reruns. Most of what he did wouldn't really work though there was a limited basis in fact.

As to CSI the whole premise of the show is bogus. At leas on the Vegas and Miami additions they are not cops, even say they aren't on the show, yet they are investigating crimes and interviewing suspects like they are.
 
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Old 02-04-13, 03:40 PM
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The figures of 110 and 220 are so engrained in modern culture (even around the world) that they will NEVER disappear no matter what voltages are common. Even the manufacturer's are guilty of perpetuating the terms.
 
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Old 02-04-13, 08:03 PM
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I never take those shows too seriously as they are always making some kind of mistake or other. Sometimes for instance you see detectives handling evidence and that is never done especially in the bigger cities as they have evidence technicians that do photographs and dusting for finger prints. Then they bag the evidence and the coroner takes the body away in the case of a murder. Sure the detectives are allowed to look but not touch. Shows are getting better about accuracy though as they hire more consultants who have been police officers.
 
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Old 02-04-13, 08:08 PM
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220 or 221........whatever it takes.
 
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Old 02-05-13, 01:51 AM
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Watching Bones last night and their science guy said a solution was very caustic then went on to say it was mixture of acetic acid and sodium hydroxide. Guess the writers slept through chem 101. Then he went on as if not being stupid enough to call then household cleaning products. Okay on the sodium hydroxide maybe but that would mean the acetic acid was probably vinegar at only 5% or so not really caustic at all when it comes to dissolving a body and not even any longer acetic acid when dumped in sodium hydroxide.
 
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Old 02-05-13, 03:20 AM
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Bones, or as I refer to it, Boners. I have watched that show from the pilot episode and every single episode causes me to yell at the television. The biggest flaw is that 98% of the cases they work on are NOT cases that would involve the FBI. Agencies such as the DC Metro Police, Capitol Police, National Park Service Police, County Sheriff and the like, yes. But not the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The FBI would not have an internal psychologist doing the things that Dr. Sweets does. Rather unlikely that a mere agent like Booth would have such a plush office. And the Jeffersonian, just no way on god's green earth that they would have that stupid "platform" area OR stand still for the shenanigans of Dr. Hodgins.

Despite her being a producer of the show if you ever read one of Kathy Reich's books you will find that the only similarity between the books and the TV show is the character of Temperance Brennan.
 
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Old 02-05-13, 03:59 AM
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I do read Kathy Reich's books and agree 100%. Then there is the major differences between doctor Brennan on the show, so unbelievably socially stupid and inept, and the smart and believable character in her novels.

Did you know it is the Jeffersonian on TV because the Smithsonian wouldn't allow the use of their name?

Yes every time I watch you just want to scream why is the FBI even involved. Maybe I ought to start a thread on television stupidity. Heck, if this wasn't a DIY place we could have a whole forum dedicated to just that topic.
 
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Old 02-05-13, 05:11 PM
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220 or 221........whatever it takes.
Hah! That's a good one, but you didn't get it quite right. It's: "220, 440...whatever it takes."
 
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Old 02-05-13, 05:13 PM
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Might be fun to make fun of tv shows if it didn't cause the forum trouble. There are so many bloopers out there that you could make a whole book out of them.
 
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Old 02-05-13, 05:26 PM
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I watch these shows and I view them all as Fiction, cuz that's what they are.
The gizmos and gadgets they use are real, but that's about it.
And the storylines they come up with are equally bogus.
I look at them as entertainment only.
 
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Old 02-06-13, 04:05 AM
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You mean everything that you see on TV isn't real I know everything on the internet is true because that little girl that had the date with the french model said so


The sad thing is sometimes what you see on the news could also be classified as fiction
 
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Old 02-06-13, 04:54 AM
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...what you see on the news could also be classified as fiction.
Must mean MSNBC.
 
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Old 02-06-13, 05:44 AM
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MSNBC - is that one of those channels that takes up space next to FOX news

Actually, I was referring to our local news stations and the national news that follows it.
 
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Old 02-06-13, 08:30 AM
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............

Clarification:

So exactly what voltage is it??? or which voltage is it???

110 volts or 120 volts??? Or what???

220 volts or 240 volts??? Or what???

Somewhere between 110 to 120???
Somewhere between 220 to 240???

Wall receptacle outlet voltage here is 125. (???)

Seems this post got off topic....

Voltages to Accuracy of TV shows????????
Good Grief....

For the benefit of all readers, some clarification for accuracy requested....
 
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Old 02-06-13, 09:28 AM
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Tom....standard household voltage in the US is 120VAC and 240VAC. It can vary by 10% though and is still considered acceptable I believe. (Maybe it's 5%?? I may be thinking of something else that's 10%.)
 
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Old 02-06-13, 09:57 AM
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More on this subject of bad terminology.

One appliance company/parts manufacturer refers to the thermocouple as a thermopile. ()... Incorrectly used terminology. The part is not a pile...:NO NO NO: The dictionary cross references thermopile to thermocouple! It's a couple. Not a pile.

A thermocouple and/or pilot generator, is the device a pilot light heats to produce a small amount of D/C voltage. Measured in milliamperes. (Less the one volt DC) DC refers to direct current.

The part is and should be correctly referred/called a thermocouple and/or a pilot generator, which contains metal strips that produce current when heated. That current is then used to keep open/lifted up a tiny disk inside the safety device. Safety Device is referred to as an ASO. ASO means/stands for Automatic Shut Off.

A PILE is what you may step into or onto while on a grassy area when you're not paying attention to where you're stepping/walking..... A pile also can refer to any substance or material on top of itself. As in a pile of dirt, pile of sand or pile of BS....

Just because one person/company/manufacturer repeatedly and incorrectly uses the wrong terminology does not make it correct! Interchangeability of some terms may apply. Granted. But not to a couple and pile.

Another inaccuracy noted on the Military channel is how a semi automatic handgun and many types of semi automatic rifles operate. The slide is not and does not operate as a result of BLOW back. Gas pressure is produced in the barrel that propels the bullet out of the barrel.

That gas pressure is not allowed to escape back wards passed the cartridge into the firing chamber. :NO NO NO: Never Never Never. That would cause a visible flash when the slide activates, leave excess burnt powder residue in the firing chamber and worse yet, compounded by the action reaction motion be self destructive and a totally unsafe condition!

Some semi automatics and some fully automatic rifles due use gas pressures to operate the slide. Most notably is the AK. Easily Identifiably by the slim tube above the barrel where some gas pressure is used to operate/assist the slides rearward motion.

Hopefully the above clarifies those inaccuracies.....

Summations:
Don't believe everything you hear or see on any media source or media type.
Don't be lazy nor naive. Check it out and get the facts for yourself.
A HUGE difference between factual, real and truthful news, TV shows and especially entertainment /opinion and commentary TALK radio programs.

 

Last edited by Sharp Advice; 02-16-13 at 05:21 AM.
  #21  
Old 02-07-13, 12:04 AM
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Sorry to say it, Sharp but you are wrong. A thermocouple puts out a small VOLTAGE measured in millivolts. A millivolt is one one-thousandth of a volt. A milliampere is a CURRENT measurement equal to one one-thousandth of an ampere.

A THERMOPILE, which I believe is a Honeywell trademark, is a single unit with multiple thermocouples wired in series to output a much higher voltage, something close to 750 millivolts. A THERMOCOUPLE conversely outputs around 30 millivolts.

A thermocouple can generate enough magnetism when the voltage is applied to a coil to HOLD the armature of a solenoid as long as the solenoid armature is mechanically pushed into the solenoid coil. This is used as a pilot safety device on fuel gas valves. A thermopile, with its much greater voltage output can also pull the armature into the solenoid coil thereby making a fuel gas valve that will operate without utilizing an outside power source.

Both thermocouples and thermopiles work from the principle that when a junction of dissimilar metals is heated it will cause an electric current to flow. Different metals have different characteristics on the voltage output vs. temperature of the junction.
 
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Old 02-07-13, 05:15 AM
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Hi: Furd

The Thermopile is then one in the same as a Pilot Generator (PG). Same device simply different terminology. The PG (Thermopile) produces higher millivolts. Used commonly with gas devices that have a remote control like a thermostat or on/off switch. Examples would be a wall or floor heater and or decorative log fireplace that uses a remote on/off switch, etc.

Out my way, West Coast, the term thermopile is not as commonly used or known a description as the description or term for a pilot generator. Out this way it is called a PG. PG has two wire leads commonly having u-shaped terminal ends where as the thermocouple has a screw (threaded) end. Commonly used in water heaters.

Clarifications for all now much better understood for all thread readers. Thanks...

BTW:
Suggestion. Always be aware while walking on or in grassy areas. Never know when you'll step on a PILE....HA HA HA....
 
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