Gas Prices On Steroids

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  #1  
Old 05-15-13, 03:03 PM
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Gas Prices On Steroids

Rolled into town this afternoon and the price was $3.899. Picked up my dog and ten minutes later the price was $4.199 at the same Holiday station.

What's this I wonder?

This from the Duluth News Tribune.....

Before today, gas prices across Minnesota rose 30 cents a gallon in a month, about what it has climbed today alone.

“Unfortunately, two of the nation’s largest refineries, both in the Chicago area, decided to close at the same time,” Winholzer said.

The refineries — one owned by BP, the other by Exxon Mobile — expect to be closed for at least six weeks.

“It’s going to be a very expensive summer in the Upper Midwest.”


Gas prices above $4 a gallon in Duluth linked to closed refineries | Duluth News Tribune | Duluth, Minnesota


Well then, isn't that special? I wish I could write here what I really think lest I get banned. These criminals should be thrown in jail. What do they expect a person on a fixed income do to get anywhere, buy a Honda 50?
 
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  #2  
Old 05-15-13, 04:39 PM
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Ouch....maybe due to the crappy weather? Ours has been right around $3.20-3.30 for several weeks.
 
  #3  
Old 05-15-13, 04:39 PM
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Baldwin, I can understand your frustration but what exactly is the crime?
 
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Old 05-15-13, 04:46 PM
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I blame it on more federal regulations I guess after that fertilizer plant exploded out west they decided to slap on more regulations. Well regulations are important for safety but they should have kept at least one refinery open. My dad who owned a gas station business had problems with the refineries around here years ago and some of that was related to regulations and some just the oil company giving him a hard time. It is getting worse though than it was when my father owned his business and some of the stations in my area are closing because of it.
 
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Old 05-15-13, 04:52 PM
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Well...I feel your pain....but isn't everyone on a fixed income? Unless they are an independent contractor or work commissions on sales..pretty much everyone is. I prefer the term "limited income"...as I and my wife are. It's not "fixed"...but it doesn't vary much.

Gas goes crazy...I drive much less and ask my wife to be light on the pedal for when she has to drive.
 
  #6  
Old 05-16-13, 04:18 AM
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Nobody is happy about gas prices, but for the average person the impact of a 30 cent increase shouldn't be disastrous. Even if you drive the 300 miles a week and only get 20 mpg that's only $4-$5.

My income is not fixed. It keeps shrinking as a greedy government(s) take more and more from me.
 
  #7  
Old 05-16-13, 04:55 AM
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When you guys break $5 a gallon...
We're currently at a low right now. Only paid $1.28 a leter yesturday ($4.85 per US gallon) for regular.
I'm expecting to break $1.40 a leter as normal this summer (~$5.30 per US Gallon). Add on top of that that I need premium for my summer car (an extra $0.13 per leter or ~$0.50 per US gallon).
 
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Old 05-16-13, 05:12 AM
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and ask my wife to be light on the pedal for when she has to drive
How is that working for you? My wife has a lead foot and doesn't seem to care too much how much gas costs. Of course I used to buy all/most of her gas but she's been on her own since gas topped $3 per gallon.
 
  #9  
Old 05-16-13, 05:35 AM
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How is that working for you? My wife has a lead foot and doesn't seem to care too much how much gas costs. Of course I used to buy all/most of her gas but she's been on her own since gas topped $3 per gallon.
Mine is the exact same, only I didn't know her back when we saw $3 per gallon (~$0.79 per leter).
Does your wife at least make an effort to notice that there is a gas gauge and should make note of when it's at or below a quarter?
 
  #10  
Old 05-16-13, 06:43 AM
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The average Duluth price was $3.45 a month ago, $3.71 a week ago, and $3.89 on Tuesday, according to the AAA. By Wednesday afternoon the average reached $3.91. A year ago the average price was $3.64 both in Duluth and statewide.


No, thirty cents isn't disastrous, but it's like Chinese water torture....dollar here, dollar there. And living on a pension is a fixed income that hasn't gone up a nickel in 12 years yet everything else has. I love milk, I love whole milk that is now $4.99 a gallon. Ye ol' check only goes so far.

Never paid any attention before the other day when I bought a pack of 5 flints for my Zippo.....$3.19 for five stinking little flints. Outrageous.

I'll be fine, I have a few bucks in the bank and my beloved savings bonds that have a guaranteed 4% interest but what about the little old ladies who try and survive on social security? Dollar here and a dollar there add up.
 
  #11  
Old 05-16-13, 07:36 AM
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I'm sure I've told this one before so I'll make it the short version. Very little old lady in front of me at the deli (reminded me of my mother) asked if she could please have one slice of ham. She then followed by asking "if it would not be too much trouble, could she have one slice of cheese?" That's growing old on a fixed income.

That's is what oil companies and other forms of inflation do to those of us no longer able to increase our income to match. I'm just entering that zone and $5.20 a pound for hot dogs drives me nuts. Our gas is currently $3.50 and I make every effort to combine trips, shop wisely, pick up pennies others throw away, but where will things be when health insurance has a $10,000 deductible and the one of my meds that says it is $900 for a 90 day supply is no longer covered.

It's not just that gas jumped $0.30 overnight, it's the fact that they don't care and did not have to make plans to avoid the local shortage.

Bud
 
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Old 05-16-13, 08:11 AM
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I blame it on more federal regulations
More regulations??? and that quickly??? Oh Really?

How about a lack of regulation? One that mandates (prohibits) both plants can NOT be closed at the same time. Both closed at the same time is best know as a monopoly!!! Collusion not a conspiricy...

I guess after that fertilizer plant exploded out west they decided to slap on more regulations.
Who's THEY? State government? Slap on more regulations? In such a short time span the state was able to accomplish more regulations? Oh Really. Conspiracy theories abound. Where is the facts?

Well regulations are important for safety but they should have kept at least one refinery open.
Yes. Agreed. More regulations are required. One that prohibits both plants from being closed at the same time as noted above. That would reduce the costs and prohibit a monopoly. Same here in Ca. All the plants shut down at the same time to switch over from winter blends to summer blends. As if the air remains only over and in Ca. As if we live in a BUBBLE...HA HA HA. Absolute BS.

It's not just that gas jumped $0.30 overnight, it's the fact that they don't care and did not have to make plans to avoid the local shortage.
Exactly. They don't care because they don't have to. No regulation(s) that require both plants cannot be closed at the same time. More regulations would/should be needed to prevent such a monopoly and a collusion from existing.

Problem is your state regulators like ours are afraid to challenge and regulate oil companies whom donate huge amounts of $$$$ to campaigns and donate to both parts to ensure no regulations or new laws/requirements/rules are placed upon them.

My Two Cents....

 
  #13  
Old 05-16-13, 11:32 AM
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The big problem is that the 2 refineries shut down to change from winter gas to summer gas and decided to maintenance at the same time and extending shut down.

In MN our situation is more dramatic because of the distance to the temporarily closed refineries and or local refinery capacity is smaller and gas from there can be floated down the Mississippi, so freight/distance also raises the selling price when the demand is going up. Sooner or later, the maintenance must be done to be ready for the fall and winter season. The storage capacities for gas are limited. - It must be nice to be in the south where demands are more constant and the different products (oil vs. gas v. others) refined do not change that much seasonally.

Dick
 
  #14  
Old 05-16-13, 04:25 PM
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Sharp Advice you are right I don't have any proof that the federal government mandated checks on refineries. At the same time I also understand how it is with federal regulators as I saw things happen at my fathers station as the result of federal regulations. So it isn't a conspiracy theory just a common sense theory and I think in this case the oil companies and the government agreed that a safety check should be done. As for this being a change over from a winter blend to summer that is also true but truth be told there isn't a great deal of difference just a few minor changes that can be done at the refinery rather quickly. I know that because of information my father received from the gas delivery trucks.

Believe me I am no fan of the oil companies it used to be my father could close his business at 11 p.m. and then no more gas would be sold. Then he was told it had to be open 24 hours a day every day including Christmas or no new lease from the oil company. Speaking of money I saw the oil companies spend thousands of dollars on big events for their dealers years ago not because they cared about them but because they were afraid of them. My father along with others was a member of the service station association and together the owners had power against the oil companies.

At the same time though I see and hear of some new regulations coming from either the federal or state government that add to the cost of gasoline. Either in the form of taxes or some other kind of thing that brings the price up at the pump even before the gas gets delivered and pumped into vehicles. So yes I do believe that oil companies are to blame but so is the federal government and state governments to a degree.
 
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Old 05-19-13, 10:23 AM
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$4.29 Yesterday

......That's growing old on a fixed income.
You bet, I see it all the time. Little old lady shopping by herself, hubby probably died, and do more looking than buying. I could be wrong, maybe they're just cheap but I doubt it.


In MN our situation is more dramatic because of the distance to the temporarily closed refineries and or local refinery capacity is smaller and gas from there can be floated down the Mississippi...
I'm not sure but don't we get most of our gas up here from the refinery in Superior? I'll have to check on that some day.


They don't care because they don't have to...

 
  #16  
Old 05-19-13, 10:44 AM
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$4.39 in a holiday store near the job I am working in Bloomington, MN

The crime? First off the "shortages" are not really there, they are assumed. Second, the prices jumped .50 cents in 3 days! But when/if they fall, it will be .03 - .05 cents over the course of 4 weeks. Third, if there is a big snowstorm in a city hit, and all the retailers jumped their prices on snow blowers from $250 to $400 they would be brought up on charges of price gouging. I understand that oil and snow blowers are not the same thing, but I think any shortage on gasoline could be helped if they uped production. The oil companies are just not willing to do that because they can keep production the same and just charge more.
 
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Old 05-19-13, 02:30 PM
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What gets me is when they change the price multiple times for the same gas that is in the station's tank. I don't understand how market fluctuations can change the cost of the fuel that is already in the tank - hasn't it already been paid for at what ever the rate was at time of purchase/delivery?
 
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Old 05-19-13, 04:56 PM
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Well...I just heard a report that a city MN has the highest gas prices in the country...and Tucson AZ is the lowest. Tucson is normally lower than us...but still...AZ isn't normally cheaper than other places. Odd why it would be Tucson....maybe they have a refinery nearby?
 
  #19  
Old 05-19-13, 07:50 PM
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I don't understand how market fluctuations can change the cost of the fuel that is already in the tank - hasn't it already been paid for at what ever the rate was at time of purchase/delivery?
You would think that gas has already been paid for wouldn't you marksr? That though isn't exactly the case the dealer gets a receipt from the delivery driver that he has to keep for his records but no money exchanges at that time. No matter whether the station is owned or leased the gas is usually paid for every other week or perhaps now once a week but if memory serves me right when my father had his business it was every other week.

It is why you used to see and still do see sometimes dealers changing their prices on a board usually using a stick to change the price or a ladder. Now though many stations do have electronic boards as the gas prices change so often. It was one thing my father hated about his business and that was the constant change in prices. Sometimes the prices were changed multiple times a day and every time they changed the oil company wanted it posted. So he owned his business really in name only.
 
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Old 05-20-13, 04:44 AM
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I understand how the price changes, just not why. How can the cost of the fuel change once it has been refined and delivered. The fuel cost has already been determined, any change in price only affects the profit. I understand the retailer has very little control over pricing but IMO the only reason for raising the price of fuel that is already been processed/delivered is greed.
 
  #21  
Old 05-20-13, 05:42 AM
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Mark, this from the Duluth News Tribune yesterday:

Spike in gas price sparks economics lesson | Duluth News Tribune | Duluth, Minnesota



The fact that a gas station operator bought the gas before the price hike doesn’t impede its value now, just as you wouldn’t expect a bar of gold to remain valued at the price you purchased it if bullion prices skyrocketed.

“In general, it’s tied to the futures market. The futures prices fluctuate all the time.”

Gas station operators may have bought their product three weeks ago, Wilmot said, “but they’re in the business of making money. If everyone else is selling it for $5, why would they sell it for $3?



I guess that makes sense, somehow.
 
  #22  
Old 05-20-13, 07:13 AM
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I know in NJ there are laws regulating how much and how often they can change the price. So if they know they need to raise the price $0.50 in a few days because of an increase from their supplier, they need to do that over several days and have to start ahead of time.
 
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Old 05-20-13, 11:36 AM
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The fact that a gas station operator bought the gas before the price hike doesn’t impede its value now, just as you wouldn’t expect a bar of gold to remain valued at the price you purchased it if bullion prices skyrocketed
I guess that make sense but when you grew up in the generation where you were expected to treat your customers fairly - it's still hard to swallow
 
  #24  
Old 05-20-13, 02:04 PM
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One thing I can tell you is that gas station owners don't really make much on gasoline. My father had a full service gas station and really made his profit more on the repair work he and his employees performed than on the gasoline. Gas prices fluctuate so much it is ridiculous and it is true it is market driven and even more so now with more speculators literally making bets on how much gas can go up.

When the economy is bad more people speculate on gasoline and the prices can go up. Various administrations have tried to control the speculators but it hasn't helped much especially in a bad economy. The oil companies don't care it is how they make more of a profit.

Some gas station owners do care though and in some states have been allowed to buy gas from any refinery which means just a bit lower prices. In other states the oil companies still have the dealer locked in which is why you are seeing failing gas stations all over the country. It is a changing world now and the oil companies are getting nastier than they used to be.
 
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Old 05-21-13, 04:41 AM
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I'm not sure if it is like this else where, but here in Ontario (Canada), if you own/opperate a name brand gas station, you don't get any say in what the price is anymore. The pricing is pushed down from corporate.
It's been like this for 10 years plus here.
Previously, the guy working there would get a call with the new pricing. Now it's done automatically. I had seen where the kid behind the counter wasn't aware his price had gone up.

Just to throw this thread a bit sideways...
Synthetic motor oil, what's up with the price on that stuff?
Changed the oil on my summer car this weekend, Cost me $10 a quart (ON SALE) for Mobil1 0W 40 (5 quarts total).
Had a buddy pick me up a couple jugs of the exact same stuff in the US as he was coming home this weekend. 2 jugs (10 quarts) cost me the same $50 not on sale (was actually $47, but rounded up).
How can it be so much for man made oil and more then double the cost here vs. the US?
 
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Old 05-21-13, 02:42 PM
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I believe the gas is priced based on futures at wholesale, but at the pump it is priced based on the cost to refill the underground tanks. When you make pennies on the gallon, the next load of fuel could cost you more than you made on the last tanker load. You actually would loose money so you have to stay way ahead of the game - thus they shoot up real fast.

When coming down, the owner finally gets a chance to make a buck. Then it is Market Forces that dictate. You can price it where ever you like, but if the guy across the street is 15 cents less, he gets the business while your gas just sits underground.
 
  #27  
Old 05-22-13, 02:44 PM
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Because of some regulations one of the major refinery plants in my area closed down not to long ago. I am sure this is one of the reason why gas prices has been rising over here.
 
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Old 05-22-13, 03:07 PM
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The other kicker is the Koch refinery is just south of the twin cities. And that is getting an upgrade which I'm sure will cause some disruptions.
 
  #29  
Old 07-17-13, 07:41 AM
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Here we are once again. Just two months ago since this thread was started and gasoline prices continue to soar higher and higher. Faster and faster. So much so it makes prime time headline news on at least two major TV news channels. ABC and NBC among others.

Last two nights one news channel reported price spiking was a result of "Problems" at refineries, maintenance, lower demand here in the USA as we conserve and drive less. Additional state sales and federal taxes not helping either...

Additionally selling refined gasoline to overseas countries???? Higher demand outside our country plus an already acceptance and willingness to pay higher prices in countries aboard. Many of which pay $7.00 - $9.00 a gallon...

Any truth to it all?

Guess big oil is going to get us conditioned to paying more at the pumps until retail prices level off world wide. (???) USA prices are about $4.00+ a gallon nation wide already. Any guess what it will be in the near future on average nation wide? World Wide?

 
  #30  
Old 07-17-13, 07:48 AM
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Here's another article, but going the other way. "Expect $50 oil, but not $2 gas, Gulf Oil CEO says"

http://www.cnbc.com/id/100886286?__source=yahoo|finance|headline|headline|story&par=yahoo&doc=100886286|Expect%20$50%20oil,%20but%20not%20$

One of the twists I'm catching is that using less will require us to pay more so they can make the same (or more) profit.

Bud
 
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Old 07-17-13, 08:06 AM
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Put $20 bucks in today....$3.55 a gallon... Regular...87 octane...Thank god I dont work or drive daily... Wife works less then 1 mile away...

When a company I worked for moved 42 miles away I was doing a lot of driving... They did not give us a raise for the move and gas was costing me $200 a week at least... Thats $800 a month

Try making that work on a low income family that was barely paying the bills as it is....It was the most struugling times of my life all because gas prices..

Although I did have a truck that gets about 15 mpg... I was serously consider buying a cheap commuter car that gets 30 plus MPG... I could have cut my costs in half.

The company just did not get it when I brought it to their attention... Most people quit but I sayed in it for the severance pay because they were closing their doors. Walked away with 30K...

Whats this have to do with this thread???? I dont know but I typed it and am now hitting the post/reply button...LOL...

 
  #32  
Old 07-17-13, 08:15 AM
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Premium was $1.53 a liter the yesturday in town. $1.49 at my regular station in my hick town.
1 US gallon = 3.785 liter

That is $5.791 a gallon for premium which I require for my car ($5.413 per gallon of regular).
I'll take the US high gas prices any day of the week.
 
  #33  
Old 07-17-13, 08:47 AM
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Generally, the spikes in U.S. gas prices have to do with the refining capacity and the operations (that do not change over night or in a month or so) coupled with the limited storage of the refined fuel and distribution.

Since refineries run 24/7 and must have maintenance done, the only logical method is to have major maintenance done during scheduled periods when preventative maintenance can also be done and seasonal changes can also be made that affect the capacities and products. Unpredicted breakdowns can obviously happen.

The storage capacity of refined products is limited and different materials cannot be swapped to adjust for demands. The large refineries with huge tank farms may be owned in part buy a oil company, they sell to others in the area because "refined gas" brands are really generic for the most part. - BP, Shell, etc. and others often use gas from the same tank farms and have guarantees for purchases and allocated supplies. Add on that, the limited capacities of the individual stations (private, corporate and leased), it usually gets down to the question of supply and demand for different market areas, ever on a daily basis. - Here, the cheapest gas is during the heart of the week for regular, predictable customers and it goes up sometime on Thursday or Friday because we have a high percentage of people going out of town for week-ends and refilling when returning.

Because of the limited capacity of storage (and ability to afford inventory) of the individual stations volume is needed to stay in business and the small ones cannot afford to inventory and maintain large isupplies - ever noticed how many small stations have not been able to compete with "corporate" or chains that buy from different refiners.

The cost of transporting petroleum is very high, especially by truck. A semi with 8000 gallons going 100 miles (200 round trip) would have a $.05/gallon extra freight of it. The lack of pipeline construction permitted limits the economies of that system, especially for any refined products. Even natural gas from Midwestern U.S. fields is compressed and sold to large eastern U.S. customers in the form of LNG shipped by water around Florida.

The off-shore markets to keep the refineries going economically is a market for contracting future sales since foreign prices are higher. The U.S. exports to China from the west coast to there because of the cheap water transportation and excess petroleum is sold there rather than shut down the basic refining with no place to put the products.

It is a much bigger situation than what I have outlined. At least the U.S. costs are very low and we can export. - Even Iran imports gasoline because of refinery capacity, while they export crude petroleum.

Dick
 
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Old 07-17-13, 09:55 AM
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One of the twists I'm catching is that using less will require us to pay more so they can make the same (or more) profit.
... Good Grief!!!

Guess the other "Twist" means using more here (to maintain higher profits) will result in higher prices as a result of nationwide increased demands & reduced supplies???

Supply & Demand. Higher demand & lower supplies (using more here) equals higher prices & profits in USA markets while still supplying overseas markets too???!!!!...YIKES!!!... Oh My!!!

BUMMER!!!!

Presently and Slightly over $4.09 gallon here!!! No price increase ending claimed to be insight per news reports. Drive less to save $$$ and reduce emissions but having to pay much more and like it. No other choices... Forcing us to electric & HyBred vehicles, public transit? Alternatives: bikes, trikes, skates, horses or walking.... Pick One...HA HA.
 
  #35  
Old 07-17-13, 02:39 PM
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Gas prices aren't as bad here but the recent price hike is shocking. Monday of last week I paid $3.14 per gallon, now most of our local stations are between $3.44 and $3.49. How can gas go up 40 cents in less than 1 week?
 
  #36  
Old 07-17-13, 03:12 PM
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If a dealer has small tanks on site he cannot time his buying for fear of running out. Just a single load will be + or - $18,000 without taxes. When you have a few islands with 8 hoses each selling different grades (typical gas, two grades, unoxygenated/ethanol and diesel), you need storage.

A mini convenience store with 8 islands and who knows how many tanks just went under and the regional mini convenience store is still in business and has 2 pumps for unoxygenated fuels since we have a lot of boaters and locals filling tanks to carry away is still doing well because it is corporate and other stores out of town have different pricing cycles.

If the local stores sponsored by oil companies or leased to individuals did not make money, that just contributes closings. The days of the American petroleum companies are actually gone - Look at Amoco (now BP), Shell (Dutch) and most others are the results of mergers and bankruptcies. Look at the list of U.S. oil companies that are not around now. Petroleum is an international business with a lot of global trading and ownerships. - Alaska oil to China and the Pacific, Venezualen/SA oil to the U.S. Now the one of biggest oil boom and reserves are in North Dakota or Canada and even some states/regions are trying to block shipments, add taxes for transmission or prevent pipelines that results in higher prices.

The Europeans (British, Dutch and others) have learned because they import oil and know the ropes.

Dick
 
  #37  
Old 07-17-13, 06:51 PM
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It sounds like you're in California, Sharp Advice. The gas prices keep spiking, but unless you live in a decent city you don't have much of an option. The bus here runs once every hour and cost $5 a day, the same price as San Diego but you don't get the option of the tram or interesting things to see. Bike lanes here are a joke and drivers are unpredictable so that option is out. They seem to be taking out sidewalks lately and its in the 100s a lot of the time anyway so why walk? Frustrating.
 
  #38  
Old 07-18-13, 09:57 AM
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Biggest objection I have besides constant price increases is the excuses oil companies & fuel production facilities always have. Some examples: Seasonal blend change overs, maintenance, equipment failures, low oil supplies, lower fuel reserves, high demands, problems overseas, etc etc & etc. The excuses, non truths and justifications never end...

Yet now as news reported there is enough (excess) processed oil into fuel (gasoline) to allow it to be sold off shore!!!!... Question then is what is the REAL truth??????????????

Where is all that oil coming from???? How can there be a USA shortage or high demand at any stage of oil acquisition, production into a usable refined gasoline fuel???? To justify such high prices here??? High demand means nation wide or world wide?????


IMO, American needs a national energy policy restricting out of country sales of oil and/or refined into gasoline fuels. We need to be first over profits and world markets. Also policy needs to apply to all national and natural energy resources.

To HELL with world markets and wall street

Supply America First with all we need in our country, then sell only any excess to foreign and/or world markets! USA needs to produce, preserve and protect our own vital national interests (food, energy, national security, water, minerals, manufacturing +++++ above all others.

How any U.S. citizen can be against us first, and not object to USA first in cooperation with our one neighbor (Canada) to the North is beyond imagination....GI2... The rules and policies need to favor us and Canada first and all others second. I've already and repeatedly expressed my opinions to our state & national elected leaders. Have you???

Your views, solutions & opinions???

and Coffee too....
Edit Note:
Edited one word in last paragraph from cannot to can and removed one word allow. My error. Too much brew...not enough Java...HA HA...
 

Last edited by Sharp Advice; 07-19-13 at 06:41 AM.
  #39  
Old 07-18-13, 10:32 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,542
Originally Posted by Sharp Advice
How any U.S. citizen cannot be against us first, allow and not object to USA first in cooperation with our one neighbor (Canada) to the North is beyond imagination....... The rules and policies need to favor us and Canada first and all others second. I've already and repeatedly expressed my opinions to our state & national elected leaders. Have you???
I had to reread the first part of this quote a couple times to try and understand if I should be getting my pitch fork ready....
The last bit allowed me to stop reaching for it.

My understanding of this and everything else similar.... US corporation profits come first. Us little people a destant second (or third to off shore corporation profits, hard to tell as the truth is pretty cloudy).

Back on topic...
The excuse we're getting locally is the transporation cost. Since they shut down the closer refinery to save employee costs, they now have to truck it from another refinery. So they are saving costs, and then charging us the difference to truck it from elsewhere. Next thing you know, they'll shut down more NA refineries and then charge us to ship it from over seas.

Also noted, some cities/towns have the cost of premium go up during the summer (when premium is used more regularly). The justification is blend change. Donno how that applies when summer fuel has less anti-freeze junk in it to start with, and none during the summer. Less additives cost more money? To kick this in the knees a bit more. Sudbury (where I work) has this more expensive premium during the summer. Noelville (45 minutes down the hwy) where I live, doesn't. Same gas station chain, same refinery used, etc.

Cost of fuel is driven by thecorporate's stock value. You can probably count on one hand all the main corps that own or supply all our gas stations.
 
  #40  
Old 07-18-13, 06:15 PM
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Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Northern Minnesota
Posts: 1,505
Biggest objection I have besides constant price increases is the excuses oil companies & fuel production facilities always have.
The excuse we're getting locally is the transporation cost.
We used to hear 'supply and demand' but that won't work so well today so they have to think of something else.


Yeah, the oil companies are used to getting 35B profit a quarter and you'll have to drag them screaming and kicking to change it. Nothing us peons can do and the politicians sure won't do anything as they're very well paid off.

I'm old as dirt and retired so I don't drive much but it still makes my blood boil when I see them getting away with this. It was down to $3.29 but I see today it's back to $3.69 in a week or so. Oh well.
 
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