Strange eggs.

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  #1  
Old 06-01-13, 04:45 AM
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Strange eggs.

My wife was making breakfast this morning and got into a new carton of eggs. She cracked 6 eggs with double yolks.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-01-13, 04:53 AM
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It was the hormones they give the chickens. Be very scared. Now where's Lawrosa when you need chicken info?
 
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Old 06-01-13, 05:41 AM
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Actually, these are hormone, antibiotic, and free eggs. They are basically organic without the official USDA stamp.
 
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Old 06-01-13, 06:54 AM
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Hmm... I dont know... None of my chickens ever laid a double yoke egg. Because of the heat I did get a soft shelled egg yesterday. Guess she had to get it out.


Hmm heres a cool site about eggs.

Double Yolks and Other Egg Oddities - PoultryHelp.com - Rocking T Ranch and Poultry Farm



Actually, these are hormone, antibiotic, and free eggs.
Dont believe it...

Chandler???????
 
  #5  
Old 06-01-13, 07:18 AM
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Pretty long odds. Here's a story that calculates it at one in one quintillion:

Eggs-actly what ARE the chances of a double-yoker? | Mail Online

If I'm making enough zeroes that would be 1 in 1,000,000,000,000,000,000.

 
  #6  
Old 06-01-13, 08:16 AM
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I always now buy the jumbo carton on the off chance of the double yolk.When younger worked at one egg farm with 50,000 birds to a coop.If I ran the egg packer would always bring home a partial flat of doubles.Pulling deads first thing in morning don't think I ate much chicken at the time.
 
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Old 06-01-13, 10:14 AM
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Dont believe it...
You don't believe they are hormone free? Why's that? They are the Stop & Shop Nature's Promise brand. They sell several differently labeled egg cartons. I think they are all the same but with different price points. The organic labeled one definitely costs more for the stamp.
 
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Old 06-01-13, 11:25 AM
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Here's an egg rating chart from Cornucopia. LINK Personally I think it's a crock. An important thing to remember is how the raters weight each metric. I know one of the factors they consider is the "lifestyle" of the chicken.

Nature's Promise was one of the brands that did not provide their egg source(s) to the raters.

Three or four years ago there was a television program about egg production on one of the cable channels. The program studied egg production, egg quality (protein, vitamins etc.) egg impurities and production costs. Three very different egg producers were studied. One was a large commercial producer, another was a mid sized organic producer and the third was a boutique producer with very limited production. Those chickens were pampered, hand fed special organic feeds and free range. Production was low and costs were astronomical.

I won't go into all the details (mostly because I can't remember all the details) but the bottom line is that the findings (overseen by a State of California biologist that specialized in poultry) was that there were no discernible differences in egg quality, taste or chemical makeup. That's a no sh*tter guys. It convinced me to switch back to egg farm eggs.
 
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Old 06-01-13, 12:33 PM
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here were no discernible differences in egg quality, taste or chemical makeup. That's a no sh*tter guys. It convinced me to switch back to egg farm eggs.

Meaning you buy store eggs or farm fresh eggs?





Store Eggs vs. Farm Eggs | A Simple Living Blog
 
  #10  
Old 06-01-13, 01:19 PM
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I believe Wayne. Same goes for the milk. There is no way to tell if milk came from a cow treated with or without hormones.

So, for awhile I was wondering why the eggs I made at home didn't taste nearly as good as the ones at the diner. I thought maybe it was because I cooked on cast iron. Then my in -laws bought too many eggs and gave us some of theirs. They were white eggs of the non-organic variety. Whereas, our eggs were brown and of the organic variety. I can tell you the white eggs tasted just like the eggs from the diner. Was it because they were organic or because they were brown? I don't know. But there was a difference.

I've had farm fresh eggs at my brother's out in Lancaster, PA. I can't say I noticed anything special about them.
 
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Old 06-01-13, 02:01 PM
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I am by no means an eggspert on eggs but I buy organic eggs most of the time and as far as egg color goes some eggs are white and some are brown. To me though an egg is an egg and they all taste about the same. I guess the color difference comes in what the hen eats that makes for different colored eggs.

I personally like organic milk better not because of the taste but because it lasts my much longer. Organic milk is ultra-pastuerized meaning that they apply more heat so that it can stay on the shelf longer. With just me and my elderly mom here it might cost more but for me is a better bargain. I also prefer the paper cartons over the plastic bottle as milk goes bad quicker in any kind of light and the paper carton kind of helps to protect against that.
 
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Old 06-01-13, 02:35 PM
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I also prefer the paper cartons over the plastic bottle as milk goes bad quicker in any kind of light and the paper carton kind of helps to protect against that.
Stop storing your milk on the dashboard of your car. And that light in the refrigerator does go off when you close the door.
 
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Old 06-01-13, 02:57 PM
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Those of us old enough to remember know that milk always tasted better when it was in the glass bottles. When they discontinued using glass, I quickly realized that the milk in the cardboard cartons tasted better than in plastic jugs. I didn't realize you could still get milk in a carboard carton.
 
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Old 06-01-13, 03:17 PM
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Eggs may taste similar...
( I could tell the difference in taste but I guess you need real chicken eggs in order to compare. Nothing in the store compares)

But other then the color of the pastured eggs yolk being darker, and having a very hard shell the ingredients are very different.

The pasture raised eggs contain:

4-6 times as much vitamin D as standard supermarket eggs.
1/3 less cholesterol
1/4 less saturated fat
2/3 more vitamin A
7 times more beta carotene
3 times for vitamin E
 
  #15  
Old 06-01-13, 03:49 PM
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I do believe all cardboard food containers are coated with plastic. Even the insides of cans.
 
  #16  
Old 06-01-13, 03:53 PM
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having a very hard shell
That's another thing I don't like. I'm always getting pieces of shell in the egg when I crack it.
 
  #17  
Old 06-01-13, 05:44 PM
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Mike - I grew up on a farm where we raised our own chickens (and geese and turkeys). I guess they were organic and free range, they roamed around and ate whatever they could find. They got fed occasionally, mostly grains that the cows ate.

I can't tell the difference between the eggs I collected on the farm and the eggs I buy at the market. Be careful you aren't drinking the "Oh my god,if it ain't organic we're all gonna' die kool-aid"
 
  #18  
Old 06-01-13, 06:41 PM
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I can't tell the difference between the eggs I collected on the farm and the eggs I buy at the market.
Really? You cant tell that the yolks are darker yellow and hard to break or scramble? ( Better texture)

The egg whites are solid and not runnt. The white parts need to be broke too like the yokes...

IDK.....Just posting from what I see...

OK going to get another glass of kool-aid.. Be right back..
 
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Old 06-02-13, 03:38 AM
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That's the difference in our eggs, too, Mike. Really dark yolk, and firm. We feed ours scratch with laying mash. They choose lately to eat cicadas, but that's OK, I guess. I don't drink the kookaid regarding the one in a quintillion double egg theory.

Some kids at church raise chickens and bring eggs to sell for charity. The little boy can pick out a double yoker in a heartbeat and set it aside. He makes cartons of just the doubles and sells them for twice the price. Hey they are only in the 8 year old range, but pretty business savvy.
 
  #20  
Old 06-03-13, 02:37 AM
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Add two more to the count. We are up to 8 double yolks. I wonder how the second yolk affects baking.
 
  #21  
Old 06-03-13, 02:52 PM
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By the way Larry I had read about your hail storm and a few of the chickens dying sorry to hear that. My mom was raised on a farm for a while and they had chickens there. She never cared for the rooster but the hens were not too bad. Anyway just wondering did you eat the birds that died?
 
  #22  
Old 06-05-13, 02:02 PM
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So I went to the store about a year ago and bought a carton of a dozen large eggs. They were standard white eggs, not free range or anything. I cracked all of them open within two weeks. EVERYONE of the eggs was a double yoke. I think the egg place just keeps them aside and then gets rid of them all at once -- for a price of course.
As for the milk, there have been studies done (I believe by the University of Oregon) that showed the plastic jugs allow light through and it affects the milk by killing off some of it's nutritional value.
 
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Old 06-05-13, 02:47 PM
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Richard, no, by the time I had gotten to them, rigor had set in, and it seemed too much like road kill, to me.

re-mdlr, one of our dairies uses yellow jugs and tauts the same reason you are, regarding light degrading the milk through clearer containers. They sell enough of it
 
  #24  
Old 06-05-13, 03:19 PM
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The eggs

I worked on a school farm in NYC, It's still there. We got double yokes usually when the young chickens started to produce eggs. The best way to tell the freshness of eggs is to look at the air cell in the large end of the egg. When the egg, is " please excuse the expression" freshly laid, there is no air cell. When the egg cools down, an air cell about the size of a dime forms, That is a fresh egg. After a few days, the air cell begins to grow due to evaporation. It becomes the size of a penny, then a nickel, then a quarter. By then it could be three or four weeks old, still edible, but not fresh. Anyway, after about a year or less the chickens stop laying, then they become soup chickens.
New subject: Where is this column listed?. I have to look for it in New Posts
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Old 06-05-13, 04:44 PM
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It's in our top secret General Chats and Discussions. Shhhhhh. Don't tell anyone
 
  #26  
Old 06-05-13, 08:42 PM
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Iirc chickens laid much longer then a year where I worked.When they did slow down were put in a forced molt.Those that lived(many)were like the preverbial phenix.
 
  #27  
Old 06-06-13, 06:16 AM
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I read somewhere that a forced molt was an economic decision because egg production will fall as the chicken ages. Apparently there is a break even point where the cost of production equals the profit from the egg. After that the chicken is roast.
 
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Old 06-06-13, 06:46 AM
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Chickens only have so many eggs. Like a women...LOL

Anyway if you let the chicken lay eggs naturally they may lay their whole life span. Say 6-8 years or so. Chickens are most productive the first two years. I guess they live to 8 or so...

Now with that said, to get chickens to lay more eggs you suppliment thier light. If you do that and give them 15 hours of light they will lay more eggs. Also molt will be delayed. They molt in winter normally from what I know.

So the battery hen places force a molt when production slows. After this 1 st molt the chickens lay great and better then before. With bigger eggs too because the chicken is older.

After this run the chicken is done as far as these places go, and I am sure the chicken is soon to be made into something else. Feed? fertilizer?... Dont know.

I supplemented my chickens with light and they laid right through the winter. 4 chickens 3 eggs a day. My chickens are a little over a year and have not molted yet.

Days as of today are about 15 hours long, so no need to supplement their light.

The longest day will be on the 26th and 27th this month at 15 hours and 1 minute of daylight.

Just my two cents!!!!
 
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