Just A Small Job

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Old 02-15-14, 11:02 AM
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Just A Small Job

"Just a small job". Have you ever said that to yourself.

Background: When I bought the house some idiot had put the back door in the bedroom. Didn't take many trips by my father through the bedroom for me to decide the door must be moved. Not that hard a job and summer was coming so I decided to use the top part of the door opening for a window AC and fill in below it. Nothing fancy. On a customers house I would have removed some of the siding so I could interlace the fill so it didn't look filled. Being my house I just added jack studs and short boards.

Flash forward 35+ years. The siding I filled with was starting to sag on one side. Figured easy job. Just a rotted jack stud. Remove the siding, put in a temp stud to hold up the sill the AC was resting on and replace the jack stud. Easy job. Maybe two days taking it easy. Famous last words.

The jack studs on both sides were rotted and the sill under the AC was rotted so the AC had to come out... and that wasn't the bad news. The floor sill was rotted out too... and that wasn't the bad news. The sill had apparently rotted and been patched by an amateur before I bought the house.... and that wasn't the bad news. I don't fit under the house any more so I have to tunnel under... and that wasn't the bad news. The ground is full of roots. Setting here trying to catch my breath as I write this.
 
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Old 02-15-14, 11:11 AM
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............... and now for the really bad news...... I ran out of beer
 
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Old 02-15-14, 11:26 AM
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Sounds like it might be easier to move to a different house....
 
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Old 02-15-14, 12:28 PM
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And I broke rule #1 when opening exterior walls. Buy enough sheets of OSB to cover the opening plus 50% just in case you don't finish. And yes, if I get a few more of these surprises I may have to switch from Kroger Oh Cola to Bud.
 
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Old 02-15-14, 01:09 PM
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Not to worry. He whom makes or made no mistakes, in the present or nor made any in the past, accomplished nothing. Learning from them accomplishes a lot. Look and closely inspect before buying. Still waters run deep!...

Possible to build an add on extension? I.E. fix the existing damaged areas then add an extended foundation outward and build an addition? to the existing room? You know. That expanded bedroom you always wanted but just didn't know it, until now...

Hurry. Post any additional surprises asap. I'm running out of BREW here too!...

My Patio is sinking!!! Cracks now forming in the slab!!!... Possibly??? As a result of a lower water table!!!??? Good Grief!!! Florida type sink holes....

Drought!!!!! 100 days of water left as reported by the local news....

Come and visit CA. Tourists welcomed. Bring lots of $$$$ and both BEER and WATER...

Nothing here to do until summer. Summer hobby. Watch the grass grow.
Winter hobby. Watching patio slab CRACK!!!!...LOL!

 

Last edited by Sharp Advice; 02-15-14 at 01:31 PM.
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Old 02-15-14, 02:24 PM
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Got the splice for the new sill jacked and wedged in place and called it a day. Will screw it tomorrow. Figure when things are going right time to quit so I won't stay up all night engineering a problem in my head.
 
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Old 02-15-14, 03:50 PM
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Oh My!!!

Will screw it tomorrow
Said something to that effect myself many times... Different circumstances since I am far from being a building or construction contractor in that regard. Have no real idea what a sill jacket is??? Nor OSB???

However, Got a few jackets in closet for cold weather. Gets cold in winter around here in them there gun range mountains... OSB? I don't know what that is either. Guessing... Oh! Son Of A B... is... OS? That Just Happens!

Excuse me for now. Resuming with my own self induced Honey Do's! Somebody has to due it...

 
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Old 02-15-14, 03:57 PM
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My Patio is sinking!!! Cracks now forming in the slab!!!... Possibly??? As a result of a lower water table!!!??? Good Grief!!! Florida type sink holes....
Just to keep you up at night: Corvettes fall into sinkhole at National Corvette Museum - CNN.com
 
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Old 02-15-14, 07:46 PM
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OSB=Oriented strand board, the successor to particle board and a cheaper version of plywood.

Almost ALL of my projects are contingent upon something else. I can't do A until I do B and I can't do B until I do C and so forth. It usually ends with I can't do Z because I hurt too much or the weather is too cold, too hot or too wet.

This last week I started doing little things to get ready for the installation of central cooling in my house this spring. Some time ago I disconnected the electric power to the furnace (and doorbell transformer) and re-connected them with a short flexible cable plugged into a circuit that is powered from my standby (generator) panel. This week I decided to move the doorbell transformer but I didn't have enough EMT conduit to put it where I wanted so I simply moved it to the box containing some switches for the garage lights. Problem was, the doorbell transformer was fastened to a box above and behind the water heater and it was all but impossible to reach the screws on the cover plate. Well, I got the transformer moved but the primary leads were too short so I had to hunt up some wire and crimp connectors for that. found the wire and connectors so the primary is set for connection but I don't want to do it until I get the secondary connected. Found the wire for that but then I decided to check the suction pressure on my furnace blower so I connected my 0-5 inch WC manometer and found out I was pulling in excess of two inches water column. That lead me to remove the wiring (I had already removed the conduit) to the electronic air filter (I have been using box filters for years) and once I had removed the wiring I opened the thing up and pulled out the box filter. It was filthy but then it has been in use for at least a year. I looked at the pre-filter and it too was filthy so I pulled them and they were about 99% occluded. I put in a one-inch filter I have used for years when I cleaned the electrostatic cells and WOW, what a difference! Suction pressure dropped to about 4/10 of an inch.

So then I decided to remove the conduit and wires that ran from the doorbell transformer box to the furnace and to do so I had to put a block on the water heater platform so I could get close enough to the box to work. I cut the wires and removed the conduit and then discovered the electrician has used a square drive sheet-metal screw to fasten the box to the wall. Not wanting to hunt up my square drive screwdriver I said to heck with it for the night. I need to remove the box and cut off the cable coming through the wall (already cut off in the attic) and then patch the hole. Once that is done I can re-connect the doorbell wiring to the transformer.

Later I decided to see if I could drill up into the attic to run the conduit for my alarm system. I found the proper size hole saw but then needed to find the extension. Found that but it wouldn't fit the hole saw arbor so I had to go looking for a different arbor. Found that but no pilot drill so I used a 3/8 inch spade bit. Next problem was the setscrew for the pilot was too long and wouldn't allow the saw shell on the arbor. Fixed that by putting the shell on first and then adding the setscrew but then the lock nut holding the shell to the arbor didn't fit. Well, I finally got it together and then went to drill the hole. This is inside a fairly deep stud bay next to my fireplace and I had removed some drywall from inside the closet. I could just reach the ceiling with the extension but figured all I was going through was drywall so it should be okay. Nope! Hit wood after the drywall and after drilling until the battery started to die I gave up completely for the night/morning...maybe 4 AM. Thinking about it for the next several hours I started to wonder if I had been lucky enough to hit dead center on the chord of a doubled truss. Now I need to go into the attic and make SURE that didn't happen!

I pretty much stayed in bed today until 5 PM.
 
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Old 02-15-14, 08:49 PM
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Furd, thank you for making my job seem easier.
 
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Old 02-16-14, 12:38 AM
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I should tell you of some of my crawlspace jobs. I will admit that I prefer the crawlspace to the attic.

The A/C sounds simple enough, just pull the return air ductwork along with the electronic filter and then pull the furnace. Install the evaporator coil, replace the furnace, re-work the gas line, the vent piping and electrical including thermostat cable. Then install a new filter rack, re-install the electronic filter and fabricate the little bit of sheet metal to a flexible connector to the furnace. After that install the refrigerant line set through the crawlspace, add the power and thermostat wiring to the far end of the house and set the condenser unit and make up all the piping and electrical. I haven't done any silver soldering for 20 years so that should be fun. Then the nitrogen pressure test, the evacuation of the line set and finally release the refrigerant to the system. Should be a piece of cake once I get that crawlspace cleaned and deodorized but I can't call in the crew for that until I take care of the several bits of data wiring and power conduits that are hanging.

Attic includes a fair amount of alarm work and emergency exit lighting. Did I mention how much I LOVE attic work? I really should replace the return air duct as long as I am in the attic as it is minimally sized as usual.
 
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