WW2 model airplane kits

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  #1  
Old 02-18-14, 06:19 AM
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WW2 model airplane kits

So in order to keep my sanity while looking for work, I started doing online classified trading. Basically pick a product type of knowledge and buy, sell, trade up. Apparently a lot of folks do this.

Anyway, I came across this collection of models manufactured during world war 2, unassembled in their original box. How they came to stay unassembled in box is beyond me, but I couldn't pass on them.
I have not traded planes so these are totally out in left field for me.

I thought I would share a couple pictures of the collection and will add more when they arrive (eta Friday).
There is one rubber powered helicopter, 2 planes, 1 glider and a CO2 powered engine in its box.
 
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Old 02-18-14, 08:04 AM
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I think I actually built one of those Top Flite Piper models back in the '70s. At first I was doubting those kits were actually produced during the war because many of the materials were critical for the war effort; balsa, rubber, steel... then I bothered to read the card explaining the missing components. This thread also makes me miss the hey day of the Cox .049 engine and all the cool toys it powered.
 
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Old 02-18-14, 08:56 AM
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I still have my COX peewee 020 kicking around.
What raised doubt with me at first was the helicopter's age, as they didn't really come out in 1:1 format until after the war. I did however confirm it is from during the war.
 
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Old 02-18-14, 11:43 AM
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Mike - A great post that brought back memories of the old days when I built models. I did have a
Cox 049, but did not like the smell and complication of "flying by wire" since the wires were connected to a "U" shaped handle and the plane only ran up and down in a circle around you.

I went the simple rout of stick models that were rubber powered or gliders (simpler and cheaper).

I built a 60" "Gulloway" (sp?) glider that similar to the 50 shown. It was complicated and took a lot of room for each element (2 wing sections, fuselage, and the attach the rudder and stabilizer) to be combined into a bulky thing. Then to run and toss and then adjust the trim and balance. I took it to school and launched from the second floor of the school on a hill that overlooked a large playground. It caught the wind, flew over the fields and got into the lower air and took a left and landed in the street. I think it was a Chrysler, Desoto or Dodge that hit it, but that did not matter after the experience.

Maybe, I will get another model to build and destroy after I find enough room to finish it. The kits have gotten very pricy and hard to get, but that is to be expected, but my time is free.

Dick
 
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Old 02-18-14, 11:53 AM
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They where pricy when I was a kid in the early 80's. I tink my first few balsa models where $15-$20 a piece. Doesn't sound like much, but take home pay still wasn't that high back then.
I built a few back then. I use to get one for Christmas and the glue, doping and other needed consumables for my birthday.
I think I only ever flew one with the 020 motor, all the others where rubber powered.
If you look at the fifth picture, you'll see the CO2 motor. That one is before my time, but something I so want to see running. My dad had a balsa helicopter that was CO2 powered.
 
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