Opening can of worms with Inspection - Permits

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Old 02-26-14, 04:50 PM
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Opening can of worms with Inspection - Permits

I didn't want to hijack the other recent thread on permits but it is kind of related.

I have to get an electrical inspection for a new 100A service. We live in a small town, seems kind of strict. Im afraid I may be opening a can of worms allowing "the man" into my house.

Previous owners did lots of upgrades over the years... kitchen, bath, copper pipe etc.... theres no permits on file with the town. The previous owners marked said on disclosure that no major improvements were done without a permit. Well that's false. But how does all this effect me?

So say when the inspector comes for the electric reason, he sees other stuff out of the realm of electricity, tips off his buddy in the building dept and then they shake me down??

Is that even possible, I know it sounds like a bad movie?

IF that is the case, this must happen everyday? They should follow folks home from the home depot and clamp down on them right?
 
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Old 02-26-14, 05:18 PM
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So say when the inspector comes for the electric reason, he sees other stuff out of the realm of electricity, tips off his buddy in the building dept and then they shake me down??
I guess it's possible but extremely rare. The electrical inspector is handed a permit form from the town you filed in. It tells him what to inspect. He's not carrying a file around for your house. He has no idea what or what wasn't inspected. He could say something if he walks in and you're in the middle of a renovation with no electrical permit filed for it. If an inspector sees something that is not correct they will usually mention it.

Most electrical inspectors are not town employees but independent inspectors hired by the town do do inspections.
 
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Old 02-26-14, 07:56 PM
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A whole lot of misconceptions of what an inspectors job entails.
There, there to protect you and to make sure things are done to at least the minimum codes.
Some people have the mistaken impression they just looking for ways to raise your taxes.
At least 50% of my business used to be going back a ripping out old work where some DIY trying to save money and DIY something and trying to do it without getting it inspected.
More often then not they ended up paying twice for the job because it did not work out.
 
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Old 02-26-14, 08:15 PM
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Worst incidental casualty I ever saw from an inspection was the inspector noticed the house next door to the one being inspected and condemned it (structural). Imagine the owner's surprise when he came home from his shift at the fire department.
 
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Old 02-26-14, 10:26 PM
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Most electrical inspectors are not town employees but independent inspectors hired by the town do do inspections.
Maybe in your neck of the woods but here most are classified civil service and most assuredly ARE employed by their respective political subdivisions. Same with all the other inspectors such as building, plumbing, mechanical and the like.
 
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Old 02-26-14, 10:56 PM
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Having work done or doing it yourself without proper permits and related inspections can definitely grow into a can of worms. In most cases it should have been opened prior to the sale, if the inspection had been done properly. Why this industry tolerates the rubber stamp type of home inspection I do not understand.

The previous seller lied and the inspector was probably negligent and both should be held accountable if too much time has not passed. If a new buyer who knows their stuff comes along in the future, you could ultimately be the one held accountable and maybe liable. Personally, I would welcome any inspector and a report on anything they see. Yes, it may cost to get it fixed, but what are you going to do, live with the problem (possibly a safety hazard) and then hide that fact when you sell it?

Have the required inspection and fix any problems they find, and keep copies of all work and inspections.

Bud
 
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Old 02-27-14, 12:38 PM
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Every inspection we have ever had here at our house or the tenants house they only looked at what they were told to look at and then they left the premises. We never had and really big huge remodels anyway except for our addition which was years ago by a contractor.

I certainly wouldn't point out problems to an inspector but if you feel you have a problem like an electrical problem then of course you need the electrician to correct the problem or a plumber with plumbing etc.
 
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