Why is he such a bad driver?

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  #1  
Old 11-03-14, 09:37 AM
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Why is he such a bad driver?

Stepson is staying with us for a while as he finds his way in life. Good kid, smart, fit and all that.

Why is he such a terrible driver???? Safe...but terrible technique. Almost 25 and has had his license for about 2 yrs (common thing I understand now) but he's a crappy driver. On the gas hard, on the brakes hard, instead of looking ahead and anticipating. On our way back from Flagstaff...he actually completely let go of the wheel to open a drink or something. No knee holding the wheel or anything. I freaked! (Yeah yeah, I know...even a knee hold is unsafe. But I've been doing it for years on straight roads.)

Constant corrections when driving in the lane (like a small boat at slow speed) almost made me seasick (yeah, a 24 yr Navy vet gets seasick). Left, right, left, right. Uggghhh.

It's tough for me to ride with his Mom as she does some of the same things (gas and brakes) but she looks ahead at least.

Any observations or suggestions?
 
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Old 11-03-14, 09:49 AM
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He is wired "digitally" instead of "analog". Causes very erratic movements.

RR
 
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Old 11-03-14, 10:05 AM
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Sorry to say I have ridden with that kind of driver, After once I did the driving. Usually that kind of driver does not know how to use cruise control. Fast, slow, fast, slow gets you dizzy. Heard there was snow in Flag yesterday.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 10:14 AM
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Is he interested in flying at all? Maybe a few flying lessons would help. Explain to the instructor that he's no pursuing his license and get right into aircraft control. Flight instructors see that type of over correcting and jerky behavior and are accustomed to dealing with it. It would totally take him out of his element where he has fewer pre-conceived notions and may be more willing to learn and do things differently.

They normally don't do it until a bit later in training but one thing that is stressed is always flying the plane (driving the car) above all else. Your life depends on it. No matter what the distraction you must fly the plane (drive the car) first. Everything else like the phone, radio or screaming passenger is secondary and should not be allowed to distract from operating the vehicle.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 11:23 AM
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Yeah, he's a digital dude. Hasn't even watched regular TV in 4-5 yrs. All online.

I know pugsl, I worked with a Canadian guy who never learned to feather the gas. It was down hard or off. Seriously made us sick to drive with him to different sites.

The flying thing might be a good idea PD. We have a group at the local airport that does that sort of stuff.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 01:19 PM
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who never learned to feather the gas. It was down hard or off
That's how my wife drives and she's in her 60's. She is the only person I ever seen that accelerates to a stop sign or red light. She even fusses at me for letting off of the gas when a stop is coming up ..... wonder why I get so much better fuel mileage than she does
 
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Old 11-03-14, 01:25 PM
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Have you tried changing him? What I'm wondering is if he's even aware that he's a PITA to ride along with in the first place. My best guess is he's not thinking about it at all; just doing it the way he always has.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 01:44 PM
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He needs to be told that he is making others in the car sick. Then demonstrate how he drives compared to your normal driving - the contrast will stick out like a sore thumb. Or have him drive with a briefcase with papers on the top and not have the papers slide off every time he comes to a stop. Tell him his eyes should be focused down the road and not at the road immediately in front of him. That will ease the auto correct every couple of seconds. And of course, remind him there is no prize for getting there first.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 04:44 PM
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Is he interested in flying at all? Maybe a few flying lessons would help. Explain to the instructor that he's no pursuing his license and get right into aircraft control.
That will probably get him a visit from the FBI.

Does he drive double footed?
 
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Old 11-03-14, 05:10 PM
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Me? Tell my wife's only son how to do something? Are you a crazy man Mitch? lol

Actually, I have tried to tell him to be a little smoother and slower in his corrections. He's ok speedwise on cruise of course...but still the constant minor left and right corrections on the highway. And making a turn is like a last minute decision. He did that when he was first learning at 16. 1/2 way through what should be the apex, he finally turns the wheel sharply.

I'll try to get him to look further down the road and let peripheral vision handle the lane keeping.

No double foot driving thank gawd! That would be the final straw I think.

Maybe I need to take him to a Malibu Gran Prix or other go cart track.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 09:51 PM
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I used to carpool with a two-footed driver. I think he needed to get a brake job every 25,000 miles or so.

I had over 100,000 miles on my Toyota when I had just the front brakes done. That seems to be fairly normal for my cars.
 
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Old 11-04-14, 02:44 AM
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Vic, does he wear glasses? Should he? Sounds as if his depth perception could use a little help.
 
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Old 11-04-14, 06:27 AM
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Yeah, contacts or glasses. Normally the contacts so he can wear sunglasses if needed. New prescription as well. Had his eyes checked before he went to Aus in March.

It doesn't help that it's a short wheelbase car (Kia Soul) with tight sensitive steering, I guess.
 
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Old 11-04-14, 10:51 AM
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Around here, most people around my age have grown up driving from the age of 14 with school permits / learners' permits, and have taken "drivers' safety courses" which, at least back when I was growing up, was practically MANDATORY if your parents didn't want their car insurance rates to double when you (a 14 yr old) were added to their policy.

Perhaps if drivers' safety classes are still around, you could enroll him, with "no highway option".

He's probably learned his driving skills from a video game like "need for speed" or "gran turismo"... or better yet, "grand theft auto". There's a nice game to teach your kids. Is it any wonder this country has problems?
 
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Old 11-04-14, 11:09 AM
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I read something about this a few weeks ago, didn't get all the way through it as I was in a surgery waiting room at the time, but it seemed to be headed in the direction that this is becoming increasingly common today, and that a lot of it has to do with the fact that today's youth do not have the passion for personal transportation that we did, at least not of the motorized varieties, and consequently don't put forth the effort to develop good habits. There are so many more things to occupy their minds today, and their travels more frequently take them farther from home, so they are content to ride a bicycle, bus, whatever to work, as well as the airport, where they can jump on a plane and head to Europe or wherever, rather than one of our boring old car trips. I realize this is a rather broad stroke of the brush, and doesn't come close to applying across the board, but, thinking of some of the things that I have witnessed first hand, I thought there was at least some merit to it.
 
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Old 11-04-14, 11:12 AM
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Me? Tell my wife's only son how to do something? Are you a crazy man Mitch?
No, but I am divorced
 
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Old 11-04-14, 11:26 AM
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Constant corrections when driving in the lane
How does he sit behind the wheel and handle the steering wheel. One cold winter night I thought something was going out under the front end of a jeep I used to own because I was having trouble keeping it in a straight line but then I realized that because it was real cold I was kind of hunched over the wheel which made it easy to over correct for bumps, even turns. Once the heater kicked in the steering went back to normal
 
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Old 11-04-14, 02:05 PM
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No, but I am divorced
X2 here...but we never had kids...now you see my dilemma.
 
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Old 11-05-14, 07:16 AM
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Yeah, a buddy of mine just ended marriage number 2 and his takeaway is he will never again have a stepchild living at home.

Only one marriage for me and the only kid was the one we had together so I haven't been in that stepchild minefield at all.
 
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Old 11-05-14, 08:14 AM
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It's just a temp thing since he came back from Aus. It will be less than a year I imagine and I can get some hard labor out of him in the meantime. Plenty to do around here that even these repaired knees aren't happy about doing. And he'll probably have more luck with getting a job than a 56 y/o fart with his own opinions about things. Already had a call back after a week on only 10 or so apps. I put in forty last year and never heard a thing. I imagine once he has a nest egg, he'll be heading back up to Seattle or off on another adventure.

I just hope he doesn't wait too long to decide what he want's to do for long term. (And learns some driving skills in the meantime.)
 
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