What do you think about Black + Decker? I might buy a drill

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  #1  
Old 01-12-15, 04:13 PM
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What do you think about Black + Decker? I might buy a drill

I was browsing the tool section while doing some shopping for dinner and they got a new drill in.
its 20v lithium black and decker. I know my coffee pot is black and decker, its got some design flaws but they always send me free replacement parts.

The drill seems a little heavy but for $70 bucks can you go wrong?
 
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Old 01-12-15, 04:43 PM
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Black and Decker is marginally OK, but may give you good service as a homeowner. Battery powered tools, unless used often, will prove to be ineffective in keeping charges over time. They need to be used often and charged often. If your use will be slight, I would recommend a corded drill. Always ready.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 04:47 PM
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You will do better buying a corded drill if it's just for occasional use.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 07:26 PM
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I have a corded drill, find a plug in is always an issue
 
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Old 01-12-15, 07:37 PM
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I agree with Larry Black and Decker isn't bad for home use and I own two cordless drills made by them. One I bought new and the other was used. If you want professional though you might want to consider Makita it is more of a professional brand and it does cost more but as the saying goes you get what you pay for. My Black and Decker drills will work fairly well for about 45 minutes of use and then they need to be recharged. Of course it depends on what you are using it for too the heavier the use the shorter amount of time you have with it. If not used for a while it will need to be charged.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 11:39 PM
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Extension cords are a lot cheaper and last longer than batteries. If you really want a decent cordless for cheap, just buy a Ryobi. I'd buy that before B&D. Their kits are always very cheap.
 
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Old 01-13-15, 12:32 AM
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Lots and lots of things have the Black & Decker name these days. Some of them are good, some of them are bad and most of them are somewhere between the extremes. Even in a category such as cordless drills there will be good, mediocre and bad selections. The worst part is that what might be good for one job might also be bad for another.

Some twenty years or so ago I bought a lightweight B&D cordless drill for the express purpose of drilling hole in crown molding to hold the brads while nailing into position. This drill had internal batteries and it was fantastic for this work. I then started using it for bigger jobs and eventually it just plain didn't want to hold a charge. I then bought an industrial-rated drill (still a B&D) and pretty much forgot about the little drill.

A few years ago I opened it up and upon testing the individual battery cells I found a couple that were totally shot. I bought a complete set of replacement cells (not B&D) thinking I should be able to simply replace the battery and all would be well. Yeah, right! Soldering the battery tabs in the right position was almost impossible and not getting them exactly right meant the pack would not fit properly in the case. I think I paid something like $30 for that drill originally and then about $20 for the replacement batteries and I STILL can't use it.

As for the industrial drill...the original three batteries I had lasted for several years and then went south. I was able to find a new battery but the cost was about $60 and it only lasted about a year before it too would not hold a charge. About a year and a half ago I found a lithium replacement battery for, as I recall, around $50 but before even the one year warranty was up I was having trouble with this battery. I finally found it to be a broken terminal in the battery but by then the company that sold the battery was long gone so I couldn't even try the warranty. It's is a darn good drill and I refuse to toss it just because B&D no longer supports it. I got another battery from Amazon a couple of months ago and it seems to be okay so far.

Now here is the bottom line. Unless you are going to be using the tool on a pretty regular basis, at least a couple of times a week, battery powered is NOT the best. The batteries WILL fail from non-use just as much as they will fail from overuse. I know that running out an extension cord is a pain in the rear but from an economic standpoint it is the most cost effective.
 
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Old 01-13-15, 04:00 AM
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Before you buy any cordless tool you need to evaluate your cordless tool needs. If you have more than one cordless tool you want them all to take the same battery! That also increases the odds that you will use and keep the battery pack in good shape.


My first drill was a B&D 1/2" corded drill that I bought new for $8 It still works but the chuck is kind of wobbly so it mostly sits on the shelf .... too much history to toss it
 
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Old 01-13-15, 09:27 AM
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As Furd has mentioned, many companies are licensing out their names to multiple other companies, so the Black & Decker home appliances you have are not designed nor built by the same company that builds their power tools. Old line companies such as Black & Decker, General Electric, and RCA are all licensing their names to multiple other manufacturers, and good (or bad) luck with one particular product (such as a small appliance) may not have any bearing on the quality of that company's other products.

In years past, Black & Decker was considered a good quality product for home use, maybe a notch below Craftsman. Nowadays, I'd put my money towards a bit more professional product if I was going to use it for anything more than occasional, light-duty use.
 
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Old 01-13-15, 06:54 PM
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I'm old enough to remember when you rarely saw Black & Decker (and Skil) outside of an industrial environment. But, once these companies started to produce lower-cost tools for hobbyists all bets were off. It used to be that among air tools there were no such things as "home shop" models but now both Ingersoll-
Rand and Chicago Pneumatic have lines especially aimed toward the DIYer. Sioux is another name that used to mean highest quality and industrial strength but even they have their less expensive line of tools.

On the other hand, the cheaper tools such as Harbor Freight and Campbell-Hausfeld are better than they were originally. Unless you are going to be using the tools in your business I don't think it pays anymore to purchase based on the name and previously earned reputation of the older and better known companies.
 
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