Telemarketer defense?

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  #1  
Old 01-27-15, 11:32 AM
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Telemarketer defense?

We've had a couple of threads running recently about telemarketers, who are universally disliked, so when I came across a service today by accident that purports to kill their calls, I went, "hmmmm".

The particular one I came across is Phone Tray, but I'm guessing their are others. The posted price is $2.99/month and includes the leased hardware which I think is a usb device to connect in series with the incoming phone line. Price sounds almost too good to be true, but it does have a 60 day free trial.

Sounds interesting. Anyone using one of these service/devices? Good, bad, somewhere in-between?
 
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Old 01-27-15, 11:47 AM
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To my mind that is no better (paying for that kind of service) than the telemarketers. I just ignore telemarketers. If an incoming call is not identified I just don't answer it. Use the National Do Not Call Registry. Rather than spend the money to have an outside source to block them, use the registry and maybe catching them and get them fined. It would make me feel very satisfied.

On the other hand, what I would like to have is an automatic call back recording that will call back every telemarketer with a non-sense call back that will tie up their phone lines. Again the satisfaction appeal.
 
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Old 01-27-15, 02:18 PM
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what I would like to have is an automatic call back recording that will call back every telemarketer with a non-sense call back that will tie up their phone lines
Now that's something I might be convinced to pay for
 
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Old 01-27-15, 02:46 PM
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Norm, the Do Not Call Registry is a farce. In addition, even if the perps get fined, who gets the money? The people who are inconvenienced by their calls? Hardly.....the gumment, gets it all, and distributes zilcho to us.
 
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Old 01-27-15, 03:35 PM
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I NEVER pick up unknown calls but i still get quite a few robo calls. I've got one of those all-in-one printers so what I'm trying for a few days is to turn on the fax function to answer before the call goes to voice mail. My hope is that the telemarketers will take my number off their list when they get a fax beep instead of a voice or a message.

I have no idea if it'll make any difference.
 
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Old 01-27-15, 04:05 PM
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I get very few telemarketers. I think it's because of the No Call registry. But then again who knows? The one's I get the most are from callers whom I originally made an inquiry about a product but decided not to buy or bought from someone else. Regardless of the fact that I stated I'm no longer interested they keep calling. I bought a car over a year ago and one of the dealers keeps calling me. I just let it ring and never answer. You'd think by this time they would get the hint. I find it amusing. Their time and money, not mine. I'll be going through this again spring when I go shopping for windows. One reason why I protect my cell phone number so private. Maybe 6 people know it.
 
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Old 01-27-15, 04:31 PM
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The Do Not Call Registry is not a farce. It has reduced unwanted calls for me by an enormous amount. I do get a handful of scammers that are breaking the law when they call me. But the worst offenders are the non-profits that are allowed to call. I should ask them to take me off their list. They probably will do it.

I've resorted to speaking unintelligibly to convince the person to hang up. It works well. Letting the kids answer the phone also works well and can be very entertaining. They are 4.5 and 2.5 at the moment.
 
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Old 01-27-15, 04:39 PM
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Andrew, I am glad you have had positive results with the FCC. For the most part, they will admit on their own that they are ineffective in stopping unwanted spam calls and robo callers. It is a governmental agency that gets low results, an infusion of monies in the forms of fines they didn't earn, and can't do their job to the extent I would insist my employees to do.

I tried passing the phone to my dog, but she was asleep and couldn't care less Good idea with the kids, though.
 
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Old 01-27-15, 05:18 PM
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I agree the DNC does work...mostly...but only for reputable firms. Political and charity places can still call...no matter how extreme or edge of the envelope they may be. Normally I can tell them don't call back and it's not an issue till election time rolls around again.

I will say this...if I ever find Carmen or Sarah or whoever from Credit Card Services...you'll hear about it on the news.
 
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Old 01-28-15, 03:26 AM
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I don't understand why the gov't doesn't or can't shut credit card services down. I'm on the do not call list and while it doesn't seem as effective as it once was, credit card services calls me the most Generally when they call it comes up unavailable on the caller ID although the last handful of times they called me it came up as my own home phone number.

Like Norm, I don't give out my cellphone number and rarely get a telemarketer call on it
 
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Old 01-28-15, 04:27 AM
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but only for reputable firms.
I don't understand why a "reputable" firm would use auto dialers and robo callers. That leaves the un-reputable ones, who don't give a hoot in holler about anything, and they will continue to call from different numbers once one is shut down. I can't see where the DNC is effective against the latter. The three I have calling me from different states on a daily basis continue to do so even after being reported and asked to remove me from their list. Those are the two legal criteria needed for being fined. How do they make money? Who likes their calls? Who even listens to their calls, much less buys a product being hawked? I feel sorry for the callers, knowing it is their last chance at having a "job", but I believe I had rather not have a job than to do that. Makes you wonder how much they are paid.
 
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Old 01-28-15, 04:42 AM
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I heard an interview once of an author who was interrupted by a telemarketer when he was writing a book He decided to make the telemarketer the bad guy, in his next novel. During his investigation of telemarketers, he learned that 7 states use prison inmates, to make the calls. If you decide to buy something, guess who might get your credit card info.
 
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Old 01-28-15, 04:50 AM
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While agree the DNC list has been helpful for SOME people, the loopholes, put into the law by the impotent SOB's in Washington, are big enough to drive my wrecker through.

Examples? As Vic noted, charities can call anyone they want. Politicians and pollsters, ditto. And the BIG ONE, for businesses; guess what, it doesn't apply to calls to businesses and since I have two landlines (different carriers, my house and across the county line at my virtual "location") which, during the day forward to my cell phone. If I had a dollar for every time I had to stop something I was doing - winching a car out of a ditch, doing a tire change on the side of the road, laying under my truck doing an oil change, driving 65 down the interstate - I would have been long retired.

I have mentioned this before, but I'll reiterate. Several years ago I started adding known telemarketers to my cell phone's address book so that at least I don't have to answer a previous number. Doesn't help, of course, when i have to crawl out from under the truck to see the caller id. I have, and this is NOT an exaggeration, probably 1,000 numbers stored. It helps, but by no means lessens the incoming onslaught very much; the telemarketers numbers change or are spoofed most of the time.

Okay, so nobody has tried this service. I'll be the guinea pig and have a go at the free trial for 60 days. Stayed tuned.

Side note: I was more than a little surprised at the $3 a month price tag. When I was surfing the website I was expecting to get to a bottom line of $29.95 or some such number and have to give it a pass. For $3 a month I may be interested.

Not picking up numbers I don't recognize? Not an option, even when it's an area code from Podunk, Idaho; could be a cell user two blocks away needing a tow.
 
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Old 01-28-15, 05:56 AM
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The Do Not Call list may reduce calls. However, I don't like the idea of putting my name in yet another database, for any reason.

Privacy Policy | Federal Trade Commission

Read ^^ "Where does your information go?"

The paragraph that starts with "our contractors" interests me. Where can I get a list of them? "Our contractors" could mean 4 or 5 other databases that contains your info. I can handle the calls myself. I never depend on anyone else, for my security.
 
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Old 01-28-15, 07:16 AM
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Yeah, it's amazing where some of our personal information can end up.

Recently looked over a proposal from one of the national motor clubs for me to be a provider. Wasn't really very interested, as the motor clubs generally pay chicken feed for the work, but I decided to read over the fine print. In that fine print, among other things, I was required to provide all my insurance coverage information to the motor club. Okay, that makes sense, but then in another paragraph it basically says that I have to allow them to release said insurance information to essentially anyone who asks for it. AH-HAHAHAHA. Like I would ever agree to THAT.
 
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