Transporting 28 foot ladder help?

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  #1  
Old 02-10-15, 11:29 AM
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Question Transporting 28 foot ladder help?

Hey gents,

I got a call today for a job interview tomorrow as a cable tech. Now the woman on the phone told me I need to use my own car and be able to transport a 28 foot ladder (I'm assuming hopefully its extendable to 28 feet and actually shorter than that). I drive a 2 door Jeep Wrangler with a hard top. My question is, how would I do this and what is absolutely everything I need to be within the confines of the law and be safe? Thanks.
 
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Old 02-10-15, 11:46 AM
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I worked off of and transported ladders all my life and I wouldn't carry a 28' ladder on a jeep wrangler! The ladder will close up to 14' but unless you had a support coming off of the front bumper that matched ladder racks on the roof [can they even be installed??] there is no way you could transport the ladder.

almost forgot welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 02-10-15, 11:49 AM
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Mark,

Thank you for the response and the welcome! I understand its very sketchy but unfortunately I am not in a great financial state right now to get a new vehicle and need to work with what I have. Is there anything I can possible do?
 
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Old 02-10-15, 11:56 AM
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Well, I don't know if it would really work with a ladder...but...

I've carried vaulting poles and 18' garage door sections by wrapping a towel around them then shutting the doors, trunk, hood, whatever, on the loose ends. You of course have to protect the side of the vehicle as well.

The hood is often an issue, but the doors and trunk normally work ok.

I'd really see if you could adapt some sort of roof top rack or similar.
 
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Old 02-10-15, 12:03 PM
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You could install both a front and rear receiver for a trailer hitch and then use a vertical support with a "T" on top of each. That's not necessarily inexpensive, but it is an option.

If this really is an extension ladder, I have carried a 16' extension ladder (30+ ft extended) on my Pathfinder with some sturdy roof racks. Flag on the back and cross tie both ends to prevent it swinging and it rode nice. Issues are the ladder may interfere with opening the hatch, but you could work around that.

Now, there are all sorts of safety issues from the transport to actually using a ladder that long (tall). Be sure you are in compliance with OSHA and they are covering you for liability, business auto insurance, and workers comp. If they start telling you that you will be a sub-contractor and will need to provide your own insurance, that doesn't work with them managing your work schedule. As hard as it might be, I would walk.

Bud
 
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Old 02-10-15, 12:04 PM
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Whether it's legal I don't know but he's never been stopped or ticketed for it - my boss ties his 22' ladder to the side of his truck at the passenger side view mirror and a post in the bed of the truck. Even if this is kosher, you'd have to protect the side of the vehicle from the ladder banging against it.
 
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Old 02-10-15, 01:11 PM
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Your Jeep Wrangler top is fiberglas, correct? It won't take a lot of punishment, so Bud's idea of front and rear mounted receivers and Tbars would be the only way I would do it. Keep the pressure off the roof of the vehicle.

Hanging a ladder off the side of a vehicle is so gauche, and can cause problems with length. Face it, your vehicle is probably 9' long and the ladder at a minimum will be 14 or 15' long.

Oh, I hate ladders, BTW. It isn't the fall, but the sudden stop that makes for a bad day.
 
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Old 02-10-15, 01:54 PM
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I like the idea of using a receiver front/back to mount ladder racks I have my doubts about the jeep's hardtop being strong enough to support ladder racks like you would on a van roof. Just tying a ladder to any vehicles roof even with towels or whatever will result in damage to the paint [maybe the body] sooner or later .... and I'd bet on sooner. You need to remember the ladder is apt to come on/off the vehicle multiple times a day!


Larry, you are supposed to stay on the ladder until you either climb off onto a roof or back down to the ground I don't think I've ever fell off of a ladder although I have rode a few to the ground
 
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Old 02-10-15, 02:34 PM
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Talking

Thanks for all the help guys. I wish I had bought a truck instead of the jeep a few months ago now but it is what it is. I had the concept of putting the ladder on top of my hard top and just simply ratcheting it down around from under the jeep to the top. Please don't laugh at me for this idea, but I'm trying to be as cheap as possible . What do you guys think?
 
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Old 02-10-15, 02:43 PM
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It won't be safe because the top isn't long enough for that length of ladder ..... and I'm not sure a fiberglass top would survive for long being used that way.
 
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Old 02-10-15, 09:19 PM
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Check to see if they will allow a aluminum ladder. Fiberglass is twice as heavy, but safer when working around electrical.

Front and rear cross tying will be mandatory and with a fiberglass top that may yield under the weight, you would struggle to make it secure. I have hauled my 19' Grumman canoe on top of that same Pathfinder and had it almost turn sideways in a cross wind, that was fun.

Bud
 
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Old 02-11-15, 03:30 AM
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I would assume that the company is supplying the ladder and that it must be fiberglass since the job would entail working near live wires some of the time.

It might be possible to strap a ladder to the jeep's top AND also secure it to the front bumper [to prevent sideways movement] but I can't see that being a long term solution.
 
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Old 02-12-15, 06:35 AM
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Thanks for all the help guys. I figured it would be smarter to just buy a truck instead of dealing with all these safety concerns and all the mileage I would put on my expensive jeep so I bought a 2002 f150 last night for 2700 bucks.
 
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Old 02-12-15, 08:51 AM
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Smart move I assume that means you got the job ?
Did you get a ladder rack too? if not, plan on getting one before too long - it will make loading/unloading along with securing the ladder a lot easier.
 
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Old 02-12-15, 09:22 AM
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$2700 for a 2002? Jeez, I'd probably pay that much for a 1992 model up here. Trucks are expensive in my area. I have no idea why.

Hey Jeanpaolo....I have a question. Is it pronounced "Tempy" or "Tem-Pee". I've heard it both ways.
 
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Old 02-12-15, 09:26 AM
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Vic, trucks hold their value better in some locales. I can go across the mountain and pay about 25% more for just about any used pick up truck
 
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Old 02-12-15, 01:18 PM
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Could have been a Dodge Ram, but that's OK. It will be fine. Vic, I paid about $8000 for my 2001 Ram just a few years ago, so, yeah, he got a deal
 
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Old 02-12-15, 01:38 PM
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I'm surprised no one mentioned tying a 2 wheel cart to the back of the ladder and dragging it behind. LOL

BTW, I'd be overjoyed if someone gave me $2,700 for my 2002 F150. Course its got about as much rust as body and it has 272,000 miles. Smart move, Jeonpaulo! Just be sure you tie a red flag onto the back if it extends 4ft past the tail lights.
 
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Old 02-12-15, 05:41 PM
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You could have set yourself up with front and rear hitches and two hitch mounted racks for less. That would have been the way to go in my opinion.
 
  #20  
Old 02-13-15, 03:39 AM
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IMO a 2 door jeep jk is just too short to be hauling ladders on full time! A well secured rack at the front/back bumpers would support the ladder ok but you are still looking at the ladder's length being a good bit longer than the vehicle.
 
  #21  
Old 02-15-15, 10:51 PM
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I should check this site more often.

Marksr: Yup I interviewed Wednesday morning and got hired within 20 minutes (vet pref helps). Still waiting for a call though to see what the next step is seeing how I took the drug testing and all already. I have not got a ladder rack yet. It is 90 bucks on amazon but I was trying to see if there is one on craigslist for cheaper but no luck so amazon it is. Im more excited about being able to transport kayaks now than ladders when I vacation haha.

Gun guy: The truck I bought has 218,000 miles on it but I guess I still got a good deal on it for 2700 bucks (f150 with 5.4 L v8 engine). Weird how its expensive in your area seeing how you're also in az. buy one in Phoenix; way cheaper here. Had a mech check it out the other day, said he hasn't seen a truck in such good shape with so many miles. He saids it needs eventually a new gasket valve cover and shocks. They wanted 600 bucks in just labor and I said hell no. And its pronounced Tem-pee.

Thanks for the help guys...this site has some pretty great people on here. Ill make sure to be on more frequently.
 
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Old 02-15-15, 11:10 PM
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Sounds like it was well taken care of. I think the deal up here is that very few of the ranchers or people out in the sticks have small trucks. They are all 3/4 ton or bigger. The ones that do come up occasionally are just beat to he!!, prob by the youngsters that bought them during the boom and are now asking a premium after whomping the crap out of them. Heck, I saw a 2004 Dakota (used to have one similar and it's the right size for my needs) at a local shop for sale with a decent price, but you could tell it had been abused. Dash all cracked, seats split, trim all messed up, worn out tires, etc. I'm not paying $2500 for a POS.

Tem-Pee...got it.
 
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Old 02-16-15, 04:35 AM
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Vic, it seems Dodge has cornered the market for cracked dashboards. I found out it was a design flaw where the dash fits in the windshield area. No play in the punches to allow for movement. My Ram looks like varicose veins, and they all emanate from the windshield. But at 447,000 miles, I'm cool. They make dash covers if my vanity gets the best of me.
 
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Old 02-16-15, 04:53 AM
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Weird how its expensive in your area seeing how you're also in az
location, location, location

I live on one side of a mountain where trucks are priced reasonably but the other side of the mountain they hold an insane value I've seen ragged out trucks priced the same as decent trucks on my side of the mountain.

Good to hear you're soon to be back among the employed [somebody has to pay for my SS check ] While a ladder rack can sometimes get in the way, they have a lot of uses! I used to carry a lot of long lumber, pipes, etc. on top of my old work van. IF you live/park in a sketchy area you might consider a short chain and lock to secure the ladder to the rack. A locking tool box is a must.
 
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Old 02-16-15, 07:52 AM
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Yeah I really don't see how some people abuse their car so much and put so many miles on it and still expect you to pay way above the KBB value. And then they complain why their vehicle isn't selling. In all honesty, your truck will treat you the same way you her. I always do preventive maintenance on my cars even if there isn't anything wrong (mostly because I like the thrill of fixing/replacing stuff) and I always use the better quality and sometimes more expensive parts even if it really isn't needed. My old jeep from a few years ago I beat her up pretty badly offroading and even uprooted a tree with her but she never failed me because I had her in the shop every Friday working on her. So I'm hoping to get at least another 100k miles on this truck, if not more.

Yeah ladder racks come in handy a lot. Im one of those people who love having the latest gadgets and installing it myself so I actually have security cameras installed overlooking my parking lot.
 
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Old 02-16-15, 09:36 AM
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Won't say that it wasn't redneck, but, until you get a ladder rack, I made one years ago for one of my pickups, something came up and needed it immediately, so cut 4 2x4's to length, cut one end down to fit in the stake pockets, drilled a hole in the other end to take a 1" pipe that I had, drilled holes in the pipe so that I could run a wire through each side of the stakes, and bolted the stakes in place. Not much to look at, but it lasted until I eventually got a rack for the truck.
 
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Old 02-17-15, 07:27 PM
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Came across this picture of Jeonpaolo using his ne 28 foot ladder.

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Old 02-18-15, 05:00 AM
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Now that is scary looking !!!

Years ago when my kids were young and my bank account was empty I worked for an outfit that never had everything you needed to do the job. The 36' ladder was 4'-5' too short to paint a gable end, the boss made me set that ladder on top of an old dodge van [scotched by the ladder rack] to paint that gable. Had I not been broke - I'd have quit!

btw - we know that's not jeonpaolo as he was smart enough to come here, ask questions and then make wise decisions
 
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Old 02-18-15, 05:33 AM
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Mark's not kidding. Here's proof of his escapades.

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Old 02-18-15, 06:45 AM
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Larry training a new helper.
.
 
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Old 02-18-15, 07:02 AM
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While I hate to admit it and definitely don't want to repeat it, I've used a ladder set up like the one in Ray's middle pic.

I also remember an occasion where the 16' ladder I had was too short to cut in a stucco chimney. When the boss came out and asked if I needed anything I told him. His reply was 'set it on the back of your truck' when I told him I already tried that, he said 'my trucks taller, will use it' Since his truck didn't set near tall enough he took 5 gallon buckets and set one under each leg, still not tall enough so he took 2 more buckets which gave the height needed. I just stood on the back of his truck and looked, he finally asked if that scared me ..... duh!!! So he climbed up the ladder and cut in the paint. But then he was the one making the big bucks, I think I got about $4 per hour.
 
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Old 02-18-15, 07:11 AM
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Hah these pictures made my morning! I hope they won't make me do things like this; I'm supposed to be a residential tech only. And seeing how I live in Phoenix, the residential buildings aren't that big. To be honest, I don't even see why I need a ladder for a res tech job but hey I'll go along with it.
 
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Old 02-18-15, 08:22 AM
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Once you get a couple of paychecks have you considered an articulated ladder for most of your work? Much eaier to use then an extension lader and more versatile IMHO. 22' example in fiberglass: http://www.nationalladder.com/Little...dark-horse.htm
 
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Old 02-18-15, 10:11 AM
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I don't know how much time you've spent on ladders but it's more comfortable working on a ladder that doesn't need to be extended all the way out. While the extra weight of a bigger ladder is a concern - you get used to it.
 
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Old 02-20-15, 03:09 PM
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Ray,

The company is providing me with a 28 foot extended fiberglass ladder.
 
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