gas pricing

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  #1  
Old 04-02-15, 07:03 AM
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gas pricing

There is a store a few miles from me and while they are often 5 higher per gallon it beats driving all the
way to town. Monday I filled my truck up at $2.06 per gallon, yesterday I saw where they raised it to $2.19. When I drove by on my way to the doctor this morning it was $2.12, $2.14 on the return trip

Makes you wonder if they have a full time employee who's main job duty is to change prices
 
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  #2  
Old 04-02-15, 07:32 AM
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We have two stations within a few miles of each other that are owned by the same guy, both the same brand of gas.
One's $1.97 the other one is $2.05.
 
  #3  
Old 04-02-15, 11:15 AM
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I think that is why most stations in my area have gone to electronic price signs, they can change the signs in less than thirty seconds and without even leaving the office.
 
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Old 04-02-15, 01:44 PM
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If I'm not mistaken these signs are electronic but it still puzzles my mind that they can/will change the price that often. When I was young the price at the pump was mostly dictated by the price they had to pay for the last tanker load of fuel. Except for local gas wars the price never changed until the next tanker load.
 
  #5  
Old 04-02-15, 03:11 PM
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I dunno, Mark. Maybe back when we were kids (I'm still a kid at heart) there were more independent stations and they actually bought the gasoline. Nowadays most stations are at least loosely affiliated with a refiner and maybe the fuel in the station tanks is on consignment and they are required to change the price as dictated by the refinery.

Heck, with the electronic signs and the pumps already connected to the Internet (for credit card usage) maybe the prices are changed via the Internet from the distributor and the station management has no control at all. Might be interesting to hear from someone in the business.

What I do know is that the "big oil" conglomerate has us by the crotch as it is almost impossible to live without gasoline or diesel fuel.
 
  #6  
Old 04-02-15, 03:33 PM
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marksr -

They are not determined that way now since most stations are owned of controlled by a national petroleum supplier taht may own a piece of a refinery.The price on the signs and pumps is changed at the same time. Each station can have different pricing parameters, depending on the neighborhood and proximity to freeways and the day of the week.

Here, stations that are within a block or two of a on ramp or exit are slightly higher than some neighbor stations that rely on regular customers and loyalty. Our gas prices usually go up on about noon of Thursday since we have a huge amount of residents that fill up and leave town for regular or long week-ends that have summer and winter home that fish, boat and snowmobile. - The stations close to the ramps usually carry gas with ethanol, regular, premium, unleaded in addition to diesel. The prices drop on late Monday AM and most are controlled in some way because of the land costs.

The local (over mile off a freeway) are steady and relate to the cost of the fuel delivered from the refinery (always a local refinery). The small independent stations are more based on the price they paid for the last fuel and how much cash/credit they have to order more fuel. If they are lucky they have enough space and tanks to buy more when it is cheaper from the refinery.

It is not simple business to be in now. Almost all of the brands of fuel come from local refineries that make many different types of different petroleum products (gasoline, lubrication oils, kerosene, asphalt, etc.). We have several 2-3 mile long slow tanker trains (many, many barrels) every day just from North Dakota that have to fit on the rails with the Midwest to the Pacific freight and passenger trains. the cars also have to return to the source. Some of the refined fuel get shipped bit of the way back (100+ miles) toward North Dakota after it is refined. Hauling a long rail train like that with refined petroleum is costly and very dangerous. Some trains go through here to as far as Illinois or even West Virginia. There is a movement to allow petroleum pipelines to cross MN, but it a problem in the "Land of Lakes". Some states put a hefty tax on oil to be pumped through them even though it is just in transition and not used.

Dick
 
  #7  
Old 04-02-15, 03:53 PM
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Funny you brought it up... today, for the first time, I filled up and the price on the actual pump was lower than the posted price on the sign by the road. The sign was 4 cents higher than my price I was pumping (2.09 vs 2.05). AND I put in exactly $35 dollars (which only wets the tank on my SUV) and the gallons came out to exactly 17.00 gallons. Never had that perfect "pour" happen before in my whole life. Its a good OMEN I believe...
 
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Old 04-02-15, 07:35 PM
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Prices running a little high down here. Was around 2.39 but jumped overnight to 2.55 last week. Now down all the way to 2.47.
 
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Old 04-03-15, 03:50 AM
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I have my favorite station...mom 'n pop, but they keep their prices low. Diesel most everywhere else is $2.89, but they have theirs at $2.65 as of my pass by last night. I remember when it was nearly $4 a gallon, I could pump $80 of fuel in less than a minute and a half. The dollar counter was just a blur. Of course that was the 1" nozzle for big boy trucks, too.
 
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Old 04-03-15, 04:01 AM
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I know they no longer base the sale price off of the price of the fuel that was delivered although my pea brains fails to understand that but it mystifies me why the price would change 4 or more times in 4 days.

According to my truck driver son, gas prices are a good bit cheaper in some of the towns he's drove thru but I'm still enjoying the current local gas prices Having personally bought gas for less than 20 a gallon when I first started driving - who'd have ever thought back then that I'd be happy about $2 a gallon gas
 
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Old 04-03-15, 04:40 AM
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I think 23-24 a gallon is about as low as I can remember, and that was for 95 octane "regular".
 
  #12  
Old 04-03-15, 05:02 AM
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Man you guys have it good. Our prices where I live are regulated by the government and only change once a week. Right now we are paying about $4.40 a gallon. At its highest last year we were paying almost $6 a gallon. Of course, about 50% of that price is taxes.

Interesting comment about 95 octane being regular. Here regular is 87 octane.
 
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Old 04-03-15, 07:01 AM
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Regular is 87 octane most everywhere now. 40 yrs ago I bought a late model truck that didn't want to run right on regular, checked the owner's manual and it said it would run on regular - 92 octane or above. Do y'all remember Amoco's white gas? it was 100 octane and lead free [back when most gas was leaded]

Keith, do y'all still have the imperial gallon with 5qts per gallon?
 
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Old 04-03-15, 07:16 AM
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We dont use gallons at all. Gas is sold by the liter. Right now it is $1.10/liter with roughly 4 liters to a US gallon.
 
  #15  
Old 04-03-15, 01:11 PM
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There are two ways to calculate octane. That may be what the discrepancy is. I know Europe used to use a different method, but I believe they are the same as us now.
 
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Old 04-03-15, 01:56 PM
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I thought it was where the modern day engines would run on less octane resulting in the drop.
 
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Old 04-03-15, 04:22 PM
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Our engines back in the 60's had too much compression to run on the crap we are fed today. Our choices were 95 and 100 octane. Dropping it to lower octane levels for modern cars was necessary since the modern engines wouldn't burn the higher octane completely.
 
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Old 04-03-15, 04:51 PM
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Weeellllll Larry, that's not completely accurate IMO. Yes, compression did drop when the big emissions rules came in, but the main thing is the newer electronic controls and other things like variable valve timing, direct injection, etc that made them able to up the compression and get more efficiency. The electronics can detect detonation and dial things back to prevent damage. Not like the old springs and weights and vacuum advance stuff.

Octane is purely a measurement of resistance to detonation (pre-ignition). Low octane will actually ignite faster than high octane...so what you said about not burning completely was kinda true I'm sure. Detonation means inefficient.

Mazda has engines that are running 14:1 on typical premium 93 octane. And they also have some at 13:1 that don't even need premium, they run fine on 87. Even that monster blown 2015 Z06 Corvette has 10:1 which would have been unheard of for a supercharged street car not that many years ago.

Remember the Sunoco pumps that you could dial in your grade of gas? Every Friday night we motorheads would all put in Sunoco 260 if we could afford it. You know, just in case we might need an extra little bit some time later in the night...lol. Probably more mental than mechanical.
 
  #19  
Old 04-06-15, 11:06 AM
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What is the octane rating of E85 "gasoline"?
 
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Old 04-06-15, 01:26 PM
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Doesn't the 85 stand for 85 octane?
 
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Old 04-06-15, 02:03 PM
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E 85 is 85% ethanol. Use only for flex fuel rated engines.

It appears that E 85 ethanol has a high octane rating ( above 100) but is lower in BTU output which equals lower miles per gallon.
 
  #22  
Old 04-06-15, 02:08 PM
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What is the octane rating of E85 "gasoline"?
It's either 87, 89, or 92. Depends on what you buy.
 
  #23  
Old 04-06-15, 02:12 PM
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I take that back.

Should be about 94-96.

E85 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
  #24  
Old 04-06-15, 02:23 PM
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E 85 is 85% ethanol.
I knew that guess my brain wasn't firing on all 8 cylinders
 
  #25  
Old 04-06-15, 02:23 PM
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According to a pretty good Wiki article...it's in the range of 94-96. But since it's not required to be posted at the pump, it could probably get much lower and much higher depending on how the producer tests or labels it.
 
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