Your kidding, right?

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  #1  
Old 06-08-15, 04:53 PM
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Your kidding, right?

Getting my daughter ready for college. One of the items on the list of "needed" necessities is a small dorm size refrigerator. Found one for $20 at a garage sale and though I had saved $100 vs purchasing new. It is the next step up from the square cube, but still a basic unit. After testing it out, is showed signs of a low charge on refrigerant. Fortunately, the neighbor across the street is a HVAC guy and graciously offered to give me the tools to recharge the unit.

I brazed on a schreider valve to the process tube and borrowed a vacuum pump and gauges from the neighbor. We did an initial fill and through trial and error got it close to operating temperatures. However, in the process of bleeding excess refrigerant and adding in, I made a rookie mistake and forgot to purge the lines of air before adding some more gas. Decided the best option would be to purge the system again, pull a new vacuum and do it correctly. All fine and dandy and a great schooling for someone like me that loves to drink in knowledge.

Hook up the vacuum pump in anticipation of waiting an hour to pull a complete vacuum. The pump runs for 10 minutes and suddenly blows. Vacuum gone, no pull, its a borrowed unit, used it for 1 hr and 10 min., guess who's ultimately responsible for it.

I just returned from purchasing a replacement vacuum pump. I am now into this deeper than if I had purchased a new fridge.

This is why I hate to borrow tools. I have 10's of thousands of dollars worth of tools, that I take exceptional care of. I borrow one item, and I end up replacing it... Sometimes that little black cloud sneaks up on you at the same time the bird overhead is evacuating its lower GI.
 

Last edited by czizzi; 06-08-15 at 05:48 PM.
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  #2  
Old 06-08-15, 05:22 PM
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Here's a good rule of thumb for you.... if you run across a little fridge that is low on refrigerant.... DUMP IT.... because it has a leak and usually can't be fixed correctly.
 
  #3  
Old 06-08-15, 05:51 PM
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You sure it's the pump? Some of mine are over 30 yrs old and all seem pretty bullet proof. At least I never had trouble with any,just changing the oil and and a few drops for bearings.
 
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Old 06-08-15, 06:47 PM
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Guyold, I have no clue about the pump, but it sure sounds like it blew. I suppose I will find out when I try to give it back with my replacement pump in hand.

PJmax, the charge issue was your suggestion, however, i was not completely sold. It cooled, just not to where it needed to be and the compressor never shut down. I made me question the thermostat stuck open, but defaulted to your suggestion. Thinking that once a valve was on, I could charge every couple of years or so.

However, after taking the step to cut the process tube and move forward, I discovered a fairly substantial defect in the door seal. It was binding on the hinge side on closing and leaving a fairly substantial gap to let air into the icebox area. I have fixed that, but have yet to test the new charge - Its tomorrows project at some time. So, in reality, it may not have been low on charge.
 
  #5  
Old 06-08-15, 06:53 PM
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I think I remember mentioning a charge issue but I don't remember recommending a recharge.
Let us know the outcome.
 
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Old 06-08-15, 07:10 PM
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Oooohhhhhh! That sucks! I feel for you! I agree about borrowing tools.

I would look into rebuilding the pump or maybe it is a warranty issue if it is a good manufacturer. Still, I commend you for stepping up and replacing it before even talking to your neighbor.
 
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Old 06-08-15, 08:15 PM
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I found out that borrowing and then breaking a tool was much worse than just buying some basic model initially.

Borrowed a neighbors DeWalt 12" miter saw back in 2000 when they were probably $400 or so new? Was working on a building rehab for my command and I sure wasn't cutting all the trim by hand.

Forgot to secure it down to the workbench I had set up and when I let go of the handle after a cut it toppled right off the back. I think I spent at least $60 or $70 replacing the plastic handle and motor housing. For that I could have bought one of the el-cheapo 7 1/4" ones which would have done everything I needed.

Since then, the only thing I've ever borrowed was an extension ladder. Pretty hard to break one of those.
 

Last edited by Gunguy45; 06-09-15 at 08:16 AM.
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Old 06-09-15, 03:50 AM
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an extension ladder. Pretty hard to break one of those
might be hard to break but dropping one sure doesn't do it any good

I don't recall ever breaking a borrowed tool [except from autozone] but I normally use the lack of a tool as an excuse to buy one my problem is the reverse, someone borrowing tools and bringing them back damaged or with something missing
 
  #9  
Old 06-09-15, 03:52 AM
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I think I remember mentioning a charge issue but I don't remember recommending a recharge.
Pete, not blaming you, just saw an opportunity to learn something new that I had never done before. I also love to sponge a little knowledge off of someone who has a different set of skills than me (my neighbor).

Anyway, this happened once before. I had moved into a new construction home in Kentucky back in 1998. My builder left several mature trees on the lot and built the house in between them. All the other houses on the cul de sac had the lots cleared and small saplings planted. So I was the only house that had leaves on the ground that autumn. As I was raking up leaves, my neighbor across the street comes waltzing over with a leaf blower and says, "here, this will save you a bunch of time". Yippie, new toy to play with! Happily I blew all the leaves into a big pile. Now to bag them he also gave me his bagger attachment. Hooked it up and began to suck leaves up. 5 minutes in I suck up a small twig and BANG. Snaps one of the blades off the impeller fan.

I did not start the day thinking that I was going to buy a new leaf blower, but that is what I did. That evening, when my neighbor return, I walked over to his house with a new, in the box, leaf blower and handed it to him. He said I did not have to replace it as he rarely used it. I told him it was the principle of the the thing. It was his, It broke while I was using it, I will replace with one of equal or greater value. Just being a responsible neighbor.
 
  #10  
Old 06-09-15, 05:10 AM
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I very seldom lend or borrow tools. And I'll only lend or borrow the really once in a lifetime use type item. If I borrow it I'm prepared to pay for replacement. If I lend them I tell the borrow not to worry if it breaks. I figure it's my responsibility to know if the borrow knows what he's doing. And accidents can happen. If it's a common tool I tell the borrows to buy it and chaulk it up the the cost of project. If I think the borrow can't handle the tool I'll tell them I lend them the tool but I have to operate it.

The only exception are my boys (sons and son-in-laws). We lend and borrow constantly. And that's because we trust each other to return the tool on a timely basis.

That's another reason I hate to lend tools. When I need a tool, I expect to have instant access to it. Years ago the Mrs, and I had a big blow out concerning my tools. She would take them and never put them back. She finally bought her own set. And I still get blamed for her not being able to find her tools because she never puts them away!
 
  #11  
Old 06-09-15, 06:59 AM
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?
How did air get in the lines if you initially had a working pump & reclamation system?
 
  #12  
Old 06-12-15, 10:33 AM
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guy48065
?
How did air get in the lines if you initially had a working pump & reclamation system?
Shhh! Czizzi is probably not an EPA certified HVAC mechanic and therefore he can't (legally) be working on the closed refrigeration system.

Oh, the word your in the title is incorrect. The proper word is you're, meaning you are. It does seem (not seam) to me that the usage of you're is fast going to be obsolete.
 
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