Stock Market

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  #1  
Old 08-26-15, 03:23 AM
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Stock Market

As we get older, we begin to think about our future more than we did when we were 21. It is just natural because the light at the end of the tunnel is brighter, and we just hope it isn't a train.

You scrimp and save, put money aside, invest it in the safest things you can, and one day you wake up and a bunch of it is gone. I hate losing the equivalent of a new car overnight and have nothing to show for it. But, I guess that is what happens with investments.

I have seriously considered, once things rebound, taking what money I have invested and bringing it out in cash and putting it in a safe. I won't MAKE any money, but I sure as heck won't LOSE as much as I have lately. And, I will have my initial amount, untouched.

OK, I just had to rant a little. CHINA, go kiss my grits, please. AMERICA, wake up.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 04:21 AM
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I try not to think about the recent stock market crash and what it's done to my nest egg I know the last one cut my savings in half but it has since recovered and has grown a little past where it was before that crash. I suspect [or hope] that it will do the same again ..... but mostly I try not to worry about it after all isn't that why we pay a broker that knows more than us [or at least me]?
 
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Old 08-26-15, 04:44 AM
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Looking back, the smart thing to do would have been pulled out the investments as soon as you heard the China devalued their currency. However, that is what everybody else did which is why our market has fallen. We live in a global economy and are no longer isolated from other countries economy.

On the flip side, after the dust settles, it might be a good time to invest as stocks are now less then they were a week ago.

"The glass full kind of guy"
 
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Old 08-26-15, 06:10 AM
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Chandler, I was just thinking of withdrawing money too. I was listening to Gary Null yesterday, who is mainly a doctor of nutrition but his show now includes politics & economics. He had a guest on who said that it's not a China thing but a global recession, in a global economy. Gary Null is on 99.5 FM at noon Eastern Time, weekdays. Like Trump, WBAI has no corporate interests backing them. Listen for a radical point of view.

http://174.121.28.18:8000/24k

He also has the Progressive Radio Network.
I believe that's at 7PM Eastern Time.

http://www.prn.fm/radio-player.php

I had sold IBM when we had the government shut down. I made some money but could have made more had I kept it. I'm still low finance in comparison to many but I want to keep what I have.

Tolyn, the glass is half full but it has a crack in it & it's leaking. I don't foresee anyone repairing it, even Trump or Sanders. Trump said that we have incompetent leaders. I certainly agree with that. I'll leave there for now but the rest of my radicalism may appear, in the near future.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 06:27 AM
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If it's not China it's some other cause. The stock market goes up and down.

Short term stuffing your mattress is an option but you've got to be comfortable with loosing money. Whatever the inflation rate is. I'm more thinking of buying. The writing has been on the wall so I got ready early and am sitting on cash. Now the worrying begins. How low will it go. I'll kick myself for buying too soon if it drops further.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 07:07 AM
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If it's not China it's some other cause. The stock market goes up and down.
I wish that it were that simple but those days are gone. As I said, I don't think that China was the cause. I think that various untaught characteristics of capitalism caused it. One of them is capitalism has to constantly grow. It can not stay still. Hence, America's involvement throughout the world based, on the fictitious reason, of spreading democracy. Instead, the World Bank & the International Monetary Fund continue to suck up everything in it's path, everywhere it can. When capitalism temporarily stops growing, our so called bubbles break. They are breaking faster than ever now.
 
  #7  
Old 08-26-15, 10:46 AM
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Larry I am sorry you lost money in the stock market I have thought about buying stocks or being in a mutual fund but I have stayed away because of problems I have seen with cousins losing money. One thing supposedly was a sure thing investing in a company that had a patent in the sewer lining business but that company soon folded up and went out of business. My other cousin by marriage I assume had stock in a company that worked with the department of defense as he retired as a navy captain but that stock didn't do very well and he lost a great deal of money.

Both of my cousins are and were smart when it comes to money but neither my surviving cousin nor the one who passed away could foresee the problems that their stocks would have. In a global economy though with stocks being tied in with other companies sometimes there is a domino effect and other stocks start to fail. Some of it is domestic though like recent reports that Oreo cookies will now be made in Mexico due to something about higher taxes on sugar that I recently read.

I too think that Trump may be able to help the economy if elected but he is going to have a hard time turning things around. For now I may not be getting as much money back but I will be keeping my money in CD's as I know they are safe. I will not name the bank here but I put a great deal of my money into an online bank that also has credit cards and I have been very satisfied with the return on my investment. The interest is so much higher than with a regular brick and mortar bank any day and it is still insured by the federal government.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 11:52 AM
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I agree with Pulpo, the main tenet of Capitalism is the ever-expanding market. What that tenet forgets however is that the earth is a finite place. Markets only expand with an expanding populace and the flip side of that is that an expanding population is using the finite raw materials of the earth at a faster and faster rate. In addition, the actual usable (livable) portions of the earth are becoming less and less. This crowding together of people creates unrest among the people and is one of the primary reasons behind the increased violence.

Capitalism worked well when the population was one-third of what we had today. Now a days we really need to work at reducing the overall population of the world as well as all the other problems. Unfortunately, the political will to do so is non-existent. Further, none of the people in prominent political positions even dare to suggest the moves necessary and I seriously doubt they ever will. People keep spitting out babies without a thought towards what these babies will do when they reach adulthood.


Richard, your "government guaranteed" accounts won't be saved if EVERY banking type institution goes belly up. All the government funding in the entire world doesn't add up the amounts in all these "guaranteed" accounts. The guarantee is ONLY good for isolated banking failures, not the failure of the entire system.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 01:27 PM
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Too, Richard, I have most of mine in Mutual Funds. I seldom draw the money out except for large purchase which I don't want to finance. I have made relatively good money up to now. My broker called one day and asked if I were EVER going to draw money out. I asked why. He said I had made nearly 21% interest in the previous year. I just roll it back in and never see it. I am truly concerned at the current revelations, and this sounding board is great. Thanks to all.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 02:04 PM
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Joel I do agree about the government guarantees I don't think however that the whole system will come crashing down. Larry I like the idea of better interest in mutual funds but I don't see any of the same protections I see with a bank account. While things are better in the banking industry and with stocks and mutual funds I think I would rather wait until the overall political climate from both parties has settled down a bit before I would move any of my money to anything else. Larry if you are interested in the bank I was talking about pm me or e-mail me I don't want to advertise the bank.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 02:57 PM
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No, there are no guarantees out there, nowadays. You are running WAO with your hair on fire feeling 10 feet tall and bulletproof at times. Then reality strikes. Just a speedbump. Life goes on.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 04:08 PM
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Now a days we really need to work at reducing the overall population of the world
How is over population calculated? In other words, where is the line drawn between just enough & too many?
 
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Old 08-26-15, 07:56 PM
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Excellent question and one I have no answer for. It is, however, pretty easy to see that an ever expanding populace will have ever increasing unemployment as the actual number of jobs remains about the same. It is also pretty easy to see that ten people will use far more in resources than will two.

And while it may be physically possible to cram several thousand people onto one acre of land I can guarantee that most of these people would prefer to NOT be so close to their neighbor.
 
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Old 08-27-15, 08:52 AM
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Now is the time to buy, not sell. Top stocks are well below their highs. Hop on and they will rise back up. Then sell them.
 
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Old 08-27-15, 09:11 AM
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Habitat loss, bumper to bumper traffic, factory farming, global warming are some indicators (to me) that there are too many people in the world.
Sorry OT

As to the topic, I was listening to a TV News station investor guy that said, the downs in the stock market don't hurt the long term investors, only the traders.
 
  #16  
Old 08-27-15, 10:28 AM
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I was listening to a TV News station investor guy that said, the downs in the stock market don't hurt the long term investors, only the traders
That is so true and actually what happened with my cousin who now that I think about it wasn't in the Navy but retired from the Air Force. He had stocks that he traded in quite frequently and was doing much better than his Air Force pay could ever give him even at the rank of captain. But he didn't watch the trends in the market and how businesses were doing and just almost lost everything.

Of course sometimes no matter what you do it is still a gamble and if you are going to buy stock then I advise buying stock in something that everyone needs like a toilet paper manufacturer for instance.
 
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Old 08-27-15, 01:32 PM
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On the converse (and I may have related it here before) I had a friend in college, who, when we were freshmen, received a gift from his grandmother of 100 shares of stock to "play" with since he was planning to be a business major. Well he "played" with his imaginary stocks and kept the 100 shares and didn't touch them.............it was 1967 or so IBM.
 
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Old 08-27-15, 02:30 PM
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Well he "played" with his imaginary stocks and kept the 100 shares and didn't touch them.............it was 1967 or so IBM.
Was it real or imaginary stock? Cant tell from your post..

1967 IBM was from 20-29 bucks a share in 67. His grandmother would have spent say $2500 on that stock.

IBM's third split took place on April 23, 1968. This was a 2 for 1 split, meaning for each share of IBM owned pre-split, the shareholder now owned 2 shares.

He would of had 200 shares

IBM's 4th split took place on May 29, 1973. This was a 5 for 4 split, meaning for each 4 shares of IBM owned pre-split, the shareholder now owned 5 shares

He would have 250 shares

BM's 5th split took place on June 01, 1979. This was a 4 for 1 split, meaning for each share of IBM owned pre-split, the shareholder now owned 4 shares.

He would have 1000 shares


IBM's 6th split took place on May 28, 1997. This was a 2 for 1 split, meaning for each share of IBM owned pre-split, the shareholder now owned 2 shares


He would have 2000 shares

7th split took place on May 27, 1999. This was a 2 for 1 split, meaning for each share of IBM owned pre-split, the shareholder now owned 2 shares.

He would have 4000 shares

At the going price of 148.50 that would net him $594,000

After taxes about 415,000

Now often one does not hold onto stock when money can be had in hand. 10 years ago the stock was $80 bucks..

Thats 1/2 at about $224,000 after taxes..

And who knows when it was sold.....

Still not bad and only wish the person is retired in style...
 
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Old 08-27-15, 06:44 PM
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Oh, she gave him real stock. He was just following "imaginary" stocks on graphs as in interest thing. Thanks for that summary on the stock. I had no idea it split that many times. I am sure he is retired and hopefully with most of his investment money under his pillow.
 
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