Transporting fuel across state line ok?

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  #1  
Old 10-13-15, 07:18 AM
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Transporting fuel across state line ok?

Hello all, I live in NY and wish to bring back some K1 kerosene fuel from NJ for my garage heater, this fuel is half price in NJ but a friend told me he "thinks" it would be illegal for me to transport it over the Verazano bridge so I am inquiring here to make sure, any ideas where I can find out for sure please as I have no idea which agency I should call up for this?
 
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Old 10-13-15, 07:58 AM
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Old 10-13-15, 08:19 AM
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How much fuel are you talking about? Large trucks carry 80 or more gallons, but their tanks have been approved.

Bud
 
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Old 10-13-15, 10:03 AM
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I'd think that applies to tanker trucks. Are we talking 55 gallon drums or five gallon DOT approve jerry cans?
 
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Old 10-13-15, 11:40 AM
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I don't know anything about that particular bridge but while most tunnels are fairly strict about restricting fuels [both gas and liquid] transported thru them, I don't ever remember seeing/hearing that those restrictions apply on a bridge. If there are restrictions I'm sure the type of container and amount of fuel will come into play.
 
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Old 10-13-15, 03:10 PM
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There are the rules governing the bridges and then there are the rules governing the tax on the fuel. So you may run afoul of NY tax law by bringing the fuel from NJ into NY.
 
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Old 10-13-15, 03:17 PM
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OK. Kerosene used for home heating is not subject to tax if purchased in quantities of more than 20 gallons. I also found rules about how you are allowed to carry the fuel in your vehicle.

https://www.dot.ny.gov/divisions/ope...asoline-diesel It says it is for gasoline and diesel. I'm not sure if kerosene would be treated differently.
 
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Old 10-13-15, 04:37 PM
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It says it is for gasoline and diesel.
But diesel is just lower grade kerosene as kerosene is lower grade jet fuel. In fact in the Navy we used JP5 in our diesel engines. But heck who knows if the people who wrote the regulations know that.
 
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Old 10-13-15, 07:44 PM
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Transportation of fuel shall be accomplished by portable fuel cans with a maximum capacity of 5 gallons each, or cargo fuel tanks. All containers shall be properly labeled.

Gasoline shall only be transported in approved 5 gallon portable gas cans, with a limit of four (4) cans per vehicle.
Kind of a gray area. It would seem that carrying 4) five gallon metal, properly labeled, fuel cans would be acceptable.

They specify a maximum of 115 gallon of diesel fuel but not how many cans.
 
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Old 10-14-15, 03:31 AM
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Sorry guys, I should have mentioned maybe 2 five gallons of k1 is the most I would carry and only once per year. Regarding the containers I would be using, in NJ the color of the container would need to be blue so something like this:

Scepter Polyethylene Kerosene Can 5-Gallon Capacity, Model# 05092 | Fuel Cans| Northern Tool + Equipment
 
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Old 10-14-15, 07:54 AM
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I doubt a traffic officer is going to search your vehicle for kerosene. I'd just do it and if stopped remember ignorance can be your friend. "Really officer? I won't do it again".
 
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Old 10-14-15, 04:42 PM
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Part of the problem is with the definition of flammable vs. combustible liquids. These two words are NOT the same. Many tunnels, bridges and viaducts limit or outright prohibit the transport of flammable liquids but do not do the same for combustible liquids. Here is the difference.

A flammable liquid is one that has a flash point of less than 100[SUP]o[/SUP] F. Combustible liquids have a flash point in excess of 100[SUP]o[/SUP] F. For example, acetone or lacquer thinner are flammable liquids and in any bulk (probably in excess of five gallons total) would be prohibited when flammable liquids are banned. On the other hand, kerosene and #1 fuel oil (not necessarily the same), BY LAW has a minimum flash point of 110[SUP]o[/SUP] F. If I remember correctly, #2 fuel oil has a minimum flash point of 150[SUP]o[/SUP] F. Therefore these fuels are combustible, not flammable, liquids.

One other caveat, if you are transporting #2 fuel oil it MUST be a dyed fuel for use only in heating systems. Un-dyed fuel is for engine usage and is subject to both federal and state road taxes. Transporting engine fuel across state lines could (probably would) be considered as trying to circumvent the state taxes in the state where it is being transported to.
 
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Old 10-14-15, 05:32 PM
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Just do it, think about it, how many times have you been pulled over in the last 20 years.
There is no fuel police riding around looking for someone transporting 10 gal. of fuel.
 
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Old 10-15-15, 03:33 AM
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Alright, thanks for the info guys!
 
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