Closed caption spelling

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Old 10-14-15, 07:30 AM
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Closed caption spelling

While sitting in the waiting room at my doctor's office they had the tv on with closed captions. Who does the closed caption? I'm not sure I've ever seen so many mis spelled words by what I'd assume to be a professional production! I assume some of it has to do with modern day texting abbreviations [words with missing letters] but the one that stuck out the most was when they spelled counter [top] as coter
 
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Old 10-14-15, 08:39 AM
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There are many methods used. When shows are pre-recorded the script is used to provide the captions. On live shows, it may be a person typing it in, or it may be voice to text software. Sometimes it's a hybrid, where a single person repeats the dialog and the VTT software generates the text. This is done because the software works a lot better when a single voice speaking clearly provides the input. Obviously, these methods vary in cost and accuracy. I agree, I've seen some really botched captions!
 
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Old 10-14-15, 09:59 AM
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I agree.
I work in the maintenance dept of a hospital and it makes you wonder about the competence of a new young doctor who is fully licensed and inserts the word "like " after about every fifth word!!!!
Not to mention ward clerks who are at least suppose to have a high school diploma issuing maintenance work requests that are sometimes unintelligible and use the written word "like" to describe what they want done.
It is not uncommon to take the printed request to the department for deciphering as Google interpreter doesn't help.
 
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Old 10-14-15, 03:09 PM
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I agree that it's the software that hasn't been perfected yet. In 1998, I installed one of the first speech/text programs, for a friend. She tested it by saying, My name is Maria D'allasandra & the program wrote my name is Maria Dolls & Sandra. Not too bad for 1998.
 
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Old 10-14-15, 03:22 PM
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Mark, it's sort of like Siri. It is proven she does not fully understand Southern English. So the program she is based on can't replicate it on screen as well.
 
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Old 10-14-15, 05:04 PM
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I'm not sure how a discussion of television closed captioning turned into a rant about maintenance requests from Dukie Howser and his cohorts that have poor writing skills but...

My rants about the closed captioning are many. First and foremost are the closed captions that are totally garbled. I see many that have several words at the beginning of a sentence completely eliminated, NBC is perhaps the worst in this respect. I see words that are torn into pieces and some of the pieces are at the end of the sentence rather than the beginning, this is common on FOX although I have also seen it on the smaller networks that show mostly programs from the 50s through 70s. Third are the captions that are a second or two behind the spoken dialogue.

As for captioning on live broadcasts...I do see on occasion where a word is being sent out letter-by-letter and then backspaced because the spelling is incorrect. In any newscast, either from the network or a local broadcast the captioning often lags the spoken dialogue by at least two, sometimes three, seconds. This all too often means the captioning runs over to the next story or is simply dropped when the commercial comes on. Quite honestly, I think the broadcasters are doing a VERY poor job in making TV accessible to the hearing impaired and they are only "going through the motions" because there must be some kind of law or regulation requiring them to provide captions.

I will say that, when they have them, that PBS does the best job in captioning.
 
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Old 10-15-15, 03:10 AM
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I don't normally pay attention to closed captioning but they had the sound almost too low to hear, this was on HGTV. Definitely not live programming so you'd think they would have had time to get it right. I understand that it would be automated but you'd think someone would double check it. If I had to rely on closed captioning and if most of it was like I saw yesterday - I wouldn't be a happy camper!!
 
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Old 10-15-15, 07:07 AM
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Now aren't we all glad the folks that live type in the closed captions are not those whom repeatedly say "YOU KNOW" ('Ya Know) after almost every sentence spoken.... Drives me nuts listening to them, yet those whom do this I know they don't even realize they are doing it!...

Early model GPS devices for use in vehicles is one that quickly comes to mind. I have one...

English spoken correctly, spelling and grammar seem to all be lots arts among the young generation.... Guess the TV stations don't test or prequalify applicants for proper word, spelling nor grammar usage and correctness.... Speed on the keyboard (Words typed per minute) is all that seems to matter!!!

 
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Old 10-15-15, 07:17 AM
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So now the it begs the question...Is the same problems seen with Spanish captioning?
 
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Old 10-17-15, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Sharp Advice
". . . Now aren't we all glad the folks that live type in the closed captions are not those whom repeatedly say "YOU KNOW" ('Ya Know) after almost every sentence spoken.... Drives me nuts listening to them, yet those whom do this I know they don't even realize they are doing it! . . ."
Man, that strikes a chord in me . . . . right along with people who use other place saver or filler words and phrases such as "like", "I mean", and "basically" . . . .Ya know ?

Here's one of my favorite video clips of our favorite Presidential Daughter, Senate Aspirant, and current Ambassador to Japan . . . . Caroline Kennedy. Obviously, no one ever had guts enough to let her know how pathetic she sounds; but I guess her Friends came to ignore it (or they weren't really Friends):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfpqMfCs8lU

The New York Times is accused of skuttling then Governor Patterson's plans to appoint her to Hillary Clinton's vacant New York Senate Seat by simply printing transacripts of her interviews (like this one) without editing out or deleting the barage of "Ya Knows"

I hope the Japanese have a way of editing out those excessive "Ya Knows" as her words are translated for the Japanese . . . . they may come to think we all speak that way !

My own experience includes having a Job Interview with someone who pointed out how often I said "Ummm" in the course of my conversation with him. I didn't get the Job; but I am forever thankful for his teaching me to edit my words as they exit my mouth.
 
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Old 10-17-15, 02:56 PM
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So now the it begs the question...Is the same problems seen with Spanish captioning?
I haven't watched Spanish TV, in years. I just tried to get some Spanish subtitles but my little $100 Sansui TV, from Walmart didn't comply. When I had an RCA, it was automatic when I hit the mute button. I think that there is less room for error because spelling in Spanish & Italian, is far more 'fonetic' than English is. In other words, the letters only have one sound except for the letter G which can have two sounds depending, on the vowel that follows. Other than that, it's sticks to the alphabet.

If your house were constructed the way English is, it would be condemned. An unwritten spelling rule in English is, any letter can be silent at any time & we aren't going to tell you when. Examples: enough, through, threw, dialogue, etc....
 
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Old 10-17-15, 03:24 PM
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Love your analogy. ____________________________
 
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Old 10-19-15, 09:25 AM
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I'm not much for analogies since the first 4 letters are ANAL but that one works.
 
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