Animal cruelty

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  #1  
Old 01-20-16, 11:49 AM
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Animal cruelty

The lead story on the local news last night was the arrest of a 22 y/o woman on animal cruelty charges. She hung her 2 pit bulls from a tree in her yard. She said she was high on drugs and the dogs told her to do it. She is being held on $20K bail.

Obviously what she did is indefensible and she deserves whatever punishment she gets but the story made me think - where is the line? Last week the "cruelty" story on the news was about workers at an egg factory wringing the necks of chickens that were ill or no longer productive. An animal rights group is trying to sue the company to stop the practice.

Are you in jeopardy of arrest if you get caught trapping a mouse or flushing a goldfish? How about putting down an aged or sick pet?
 
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  #2  
Old 01-20-16, 12:08 PM
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Obviously a line needs to be drawn and most people would agree that killing a mouse or flushing dead or dying goldfish down the toilet is acceptable as well as putting down your pet. None of those things is very pleasant to do I know especially after having to put down three cats I was very close to. Actually one put itself down as it had a heart attack and couldn't be revived.

One thing that is obvious cruelty to animals is leaving your dog outside in freezing temperatures or any other animal for that matter. Obviously taking in a pet turtle or some fish from a pond is rather hard to do but I would rather see them indoors even if you can provide heat for them outdoors if I had those animals. Some will say that isn't necessary they will survive on their own so it is open to interpretation and each persons beliefs as to what is cruelty to animals and what is not.
 
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Old 01-20-16, 02:16 PM
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I disagree about taking outside dogs/cats in when it's cold. IMO when they are used to the elements and come into the heat that might be a determent to their health. I understand some breeds can take the cold better than others [those that can't probably shouldn't be outside pets to start with] It is important to make sure they have plenty to eat and unfrozen water to drink!
 
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Old 01-20-16, 05:26 PM
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For me the line is easy to draw. If it is a feral animal, and for this discussion I define feral as being born in the wild, it is not cruel on the part of the human to not bring the animal (any animal) inside. On the other hand, if the animal IS domesticated then it IS cruel to not bring them in during adverse weather. It makes no difference to me if the animal is a cat, dog, horse, pet rat, iguana, armadillo or spider. If the animal interacts with humans on a regular basis then it is a companion animal and deserves to be treated as well as any other companion...meaning human companion.

Case in point is my Toby kitty. He first appeared on my deck many years ago in the midst of summer. It took a few days for him to stop hissing at me and then allow me to pet him, eventually he felt comfortable enough to come in the house. I always put him outside before going to bed until the weather turned cold, maybe in October or possibly November. Toby has very short and rather sparse fur, you can actually see his skin through his fur in many areas. He is NOT losing his fur, he simply doesn't have that much. Anyway, when the outside temperatures started dropping into the lower forties I told him that he couldn't stay outside all night anymore. He was ecstatic and he has been sleeping inside ever since. Toby is not a friendly cat when it comes to other people, in fact he is decidedly UN friendly and will hide if anyone comes to the door. But with me he is often a constant companion. He demands to sleep with me every single night and every morning he needs to be cuddled, skritched and petted. Making him stay outside during cold weather would most definitely be cruel.


Sometime in the last several weeks there was a story I read on my local television news site concerning a trial for a man that took his sick companion animal (I don't remember if it was a dog or cat but I think dog) out in the back yard and shot the animal in the head. He was brought up on charges of animal cruelty and convicted. The reasoning of the court was that while such behavior may have been (barely) acceptable in certain areas in the past it is NOT acceptable in an urban or even suburban area today. Had the man taken the animal to a veterinarian for either treatment of the animal's maladies or simple humane euthanasia there would have been no crime committed.
 
  #5  
Old 01-20-16, 05:46 PM
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Local S.P.C.A. unloaded their animal transport van but missed one dog. Fifteen hours later they found him in the truck cage. About 12 degrees here last night. The dog was suffering from severe hypothermia and the shelter vet had to euthanize the dog. The workers were reprimanded.
This happened yesterday.
 
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Old 01-20-16, 06:19 PM
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As an avid hunter my #1 goal is to achieve the fastest/cleanest kill I can. I have passed up on many deer because they did not give me the perfect shot. I would rather not shoot then wound an animal and have it suffer. The last deer I shot walked 10 yards and fell over. It was one of my most successful hunts IMO.

One thing that is obvious cruelty to animals is leaving your dog outside in freezing temperatures or any other animal for that matter.
The animals we have on our little hobby farm get the best treatment I can provide. However horses and other farm animals can, and do, handle below zero temps just fine. Chickens can handle temps to about 0 degrees, but I have a heat lamp for them to keep the water from freezing. Horses water is heated by a tank heater.

We also have cats which are indoor/outdoor cats. (in during the night, out during the day when they want to go out) I put down our oldest cat because IMO putting him in the carrier, putting him in the car (cats do not like cars) and bringing him to the vet where the have to shave his arm, stick him with a needle just to put him down. This is going to be WAY more stressful on him then be carrying him to the back yard and putting a bullet through his head. Now I live in the country where I can discharge a firearm without issue. I would not recommend doing this in a urban setting.
 
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Old 01-20-16, 06:38 PM
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...cats do not like cars...
Depends on the cat. Toby cries from the moment I start the engine until I turn it off. Douglas doesn't mind at all. When he was younger I used to take Douglas with me often when I just went out driving to get away from the house.
 
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Old 01-21-16, 03:53 AM
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We have had Shetland Sheep Dogs, and found them often sprawled out belly down on an ice patch in mid winter. They seemed unaffected by extreme cold. Our short haired lab, on the other hand goes out begrudgingly, does her thing, and zips back in as if we had abandoned her.

Joel, I have built about 6 feral cat "condos" for a PUP's (prevent unwanted pregnancies) outfit locally. They take the feral cats, spay/neuter them and release them back into their environment. As you say, they are accustomed to it. These condos are double walled with 2" XPS between the sandwiches and offset front/back escape doors and a wind divider. Pretty snazzy, really. All made from scrap cedar that I had taken off a jobsite remodel.
 
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Old 01-21-16, 04:11 AM
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We have 2 dogs; the shepherd/collie/mutt doesn't like to get wet and will stay in his house until the weather passes, the border collie loves to play in the rain/snow. The happiest I think I've seen him was during a hail storm - he was running/jumping and biting the hail as it came down. I had to duck in the barn as the hail was too hard for my noggin! The border collie also takes naps on the ice/snow

I noticed I didn't mention earlier that outside animals must also have a dry shelter out of the wind .... guess I figured that went without saying
 
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Old 01-21-16, 02:23 PM
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Not sure of other states, but in Georgia, animal cruelty is a felony. Quite serious about it.
 
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Old 01-21-16, 02:34 PM
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I think it might be in all states but the definition of cruelty varies. In a town near me they tried to pass a law making it illegal for any pets to be keep outside after dark. As far as I know it didn't get passed.
 
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Old 01-21-16, 07:23 PM
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Joel, I have built about 6 feral cat "condos" for a PUP's (prevent unwanted pregnancies) outfit locally.
Thank you, Larry. Up here we have a group called The Feral Cat Spay/Neuter Project that does much the same thing.


I noticed I didn't mention earlier that outside animals must also have a dry shelter out of the wind .... guess I figured that went without saying
You would think so but unfortunately it isn't at all unusual to see animals tied up or in a fenced enclosure with absolutely no way to get out of the wind and rain.


We have 2 dogs; the shepherd/collie/mutt doesn't like to get wet and will stay in his house until the weather passes, the border collie loves to play in the rain/snow.
Douglas just loves to be outside regardless of the weather. Maybe it is because he is such a fuzzy cat or maybe it is because I don't let him outside after dark. He is happy if it is raining, snowing, freezing or whatever as long as he gets to come inside periodically. Toby, however, acts like Elphaba in trying to avoid the rain. Although he does want to go out every day (and night) he still spends the vast majority of the time indoors. Squirmy doesn't seem to care either way.
 
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Old 01-22-16, 04:30 AM
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I didn't think I had a picture of one, but here it is. All sides and bottom/top insulated.

Name:  cat box.jpg
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Old 01-22-16, 06:58 PM
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I quickly skimmed through this set of post. I have to agree with Marksr and Furd.

Here's a true story from my daughter (the vet). Happened about two weeks ago as we were bringing our dog to her to see what she might due to prolong a no painfull life. He on his last legs. But I digress.

She gets a call in the early morning hours (2:00 am) from a family that wants to bring in a cat that is not right. She tell them that just to walk in the door will be $165 for emergency service, then any services, test and meds will be additional. They meet at the clinic. The cat is a feral cat they found. My daughter examines it and determines that it has a high probability of being rabid! She explains to them that rabies can only be determined by killing and testing the animal. They refuse to let her euthanize it saying they want to bring it to a no kill shelter! She explains that they will only tell them the same thing and will in fact kill the cat. (Mind, you my daughter has no authority to confiscate the animal.) They still refuse and want to leave with the cat. She tells them in no uncertain terms that in no way should they touch the cat and be sure not to get scratched or bitten because rabies is very likely fatal. All the while the parents are letting the kids play and pet the cat. My daughter was beside herself. She made sure she made a full report and dotted every i and crossed every tee. She saw what was coming. Sure enough that day she gets a call from the local health department that the cat tested positive for rabies AND TWO PEOPLE GOT BIT. ONE KID AND AN ADULT. She was told that she had better go to the local clinic and get booster shots for herself. To top it off, the shelter person made a remark that they over heard the client say something to the effect that they intend to sue my daughter and the vet practice. Her boss laughed and said not a snowball chance in hell!

Moral? Feral animals should be left alone no matter what. PETA is a PITA!
 
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Old 01-27-16, 02:25 AM
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Keeping an animal in a zoo is not cruel. You have to take in mind that most animals on this world are not very smart and they don't really know what is going on. feel that anyone who thinks dog abuse is cruel, but cow abuse/chicken abuse/horse abuse/etc is okay is the biggest moronic idiot the world has seen, and they really need to get out of their ignorant bubble.
 
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Old 01-27-16, 02:56 AM
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most animals on this world are not very smart and they don't really know what is going on
I guess it depends on how you define intelligence. Most animals can figure how to survive if left on their own.

This article isn't very informative as there is no info on where the dog was found but it does tell about her recovery Puppy's road to recovery after found nearly frozen to death | News - Home
 
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