Hometime Going off the air

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  #1  
Old 02-02-16, 01:10 PM
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Hometime Going off the air

I just saw some sad news about Hometime going off of PBS from Dean Johnson not sure if the syndicated version is going too but it kind of looks that way. I saw the post on Facebook and I will paste it here after my comments.

To me the show I think was declining as it didn't offer as much step by step advice. But still it was fun to watch on the weekend and I still thought it was good. Here are Dean Johnsons Remarks
Dearest Viewers,
As you may have heard on our show which aired last weekend, we are just wrapping up our 29th season of producing Hometime shows for public television. It’s been an honor and a pleasure presenting the best and most interesting how-to information and do-it-yourself projects that we could find, and we’ve heard from many viewers over the years.

The last few days, we've received many touching emails and posts, wishing us luck and thanking us for 29 years of home improvement tips. We are all very touched and read every single comment from you all!

But now the time has come to pack up the cameras, put away the tools and ladders, and bring the Hometime show to a close. There will be re-broadcasts of recent Hometime shows in February and March of 2016.

After that, we’ll be ending the show’s broadcast on PBS, but we are ever so grateful and thankful for all the support we’ve received from viewers like you around the country.

Existing videos, episode pages, sponsors and products, and DIY tips will remain on our website for your information, and how-to DVDs and books will still be available for sale too!

So…from the Hometime crew, best of luck with all your projects and as always, thanks for watching!

Always remember that YOU can do whatever home improvement project you set your mind on!

Kind regards,

Dean Johnson, President/Co-Host
& the entire crew and production staff of Hometime
(& Finn the Golden Retriever too!)
 
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  #2  
Old 02-02-16, 02:17 PM
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I think my local PBS station (Seattle) dropped Hometime several years ago due to budget problems (caused by the previous general manager of the station). After I dropped my cable subscription (about two years ago in April or May) I could no longer receive on a reliable basis the Tacoma (about 30 miles further away than Seattle) PBS station which still carried Hometime so I have already become accustomed to not seeing the show. Even the syndicated version (i.e reruns) are on a channel that I cannot receive reliably.

To me the show I think was declining as it didn't offer as much step by step advice.
I agree, they were trying to be another This Old House and it just wasn't the same. They changed their format of common people doing relatively small jobs on their own homes to doing high-end remodels or building completely new (usually high-end) homes that few "working" people could ever hope of owning. In the early years it was Dean and Peggy (Knapp), then Dean and JoAnne (Liebeler) then Dean and Suzanne (Egli) and then Dean and Robin (Hartl) and finally Dean and Miriam (Johnson, but no relation to Dean) who is my personal favorite.

I'll miss the "on-air" crew but I won't miss the projects that have as much relevance to me and my lifestyle (and funding) as a NASA project of going to Mars. I guess this is evolution as ALL the "DIY type" of shows have gone by the wayside. Sad in my opinion as it seems that "working with your hands" is generally looked down upon by the beautiful people.
 
  #3  
Old 02-02-16, 07:32 PM
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Sad in my opinion as it seems that "working with your hands" is generally looked down upon by the beautiful people.
I couldn't agree with you more Joel I myself enjoy working on projects and the few shows that are still around that do offer a bit of instruction are few and far between now. Most of the better shows are on cable and not always accessible to everyone either because it isn't available or it's just too expensive. For us it is too expensive the internet is expensive enough along with the phone. This time around I am having my contractor install cabinets but I learned some good cabinet tips on Hometime back in the old days.

Ask This Old House though has done a fairly good job and I can give them a good grade. I do think there is room for improvement though but overall it isn't a bad show. I still watch This Old House but to me the show has gone downhill some and I watch it mainly to be entertained not for learning.
 
  #4  
Old 02-03-16, 11:23 AM
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Cable TV (Off topic)

I never had cable TV at my previous house as I could get all the broadcast channels with an antenna with a rotator. When I moved to my present house I could sort of, kind of, get most channels with an antenna and rotator. After living here for a year, maybe two, I got tired of trying to remember to rotate the antenna every time I would change the channel automatically on the video recorder so I ordered the ultra basic cable service. That service was about $12-14 a month. After about a year I found out that I also had a few "cable only" channels in the mix so I reprogrammed both the television and the video recorder to be able to watch things like HGTV, Discovery, History and a few others.

Then they started messing with me. First it was just raising the monthly fee, which eventually went to $25 a month or so. Then they started removing channels, after the digital change for broadcast TV, during which and for a few months after they kept telling everyone that IF you had cable service NOTHING WOULD CHANGE. Well, it DID change. They started digitizing the upper tier of channels and I lost all those cable only channels. Of course if I wanted to RENT/LEASE a converter box (at an additional monthly fee) I could again see these channels BUT just like in the antenna days I would have to manually change the converter box channel in order to record from different channels. Since I had three recorders (so I could record three different programs at the same time) this was simply out of the question.

Of course I could always rent THEIR recorder, at yet another monthly fee but by this time my monthly fee would have been something north of $50 a month.

Then they decided to encrypt their signals, ostensibly to stop all the pirating and also to allow service changes without having a tech come to the house. They DID give at no charge three decryption devices, all having the same remote control code, to allow for three different televisions in a single household. Unfortunately, because they all used the same remote control code I had to use black plastic tape over the front of these units to prevent the remote from changing all three at the same time.

By now I had had enough. I had lost several channels, the cost had more than doubled, I had lost the ability to record different channels without a lot of fussing around and I had more remote controls to deal with. I bought an antenna, found that OTA signals were in a much closer directional grouping than before, negating the need for a rotator and I totally dropped the cable service. Of course the lack of what I considered to be "quality programming" over the cable, at least without spending $100 a month, made the decision to cut the cable easy for me. It cost me maybe the equivalent of three months of my cable fee to switch to an antenna but is has been well worth it in my opinion.

Next post will be back on topic.
 
  #5  
Old 02-03-16, 01:37 PM
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Hometime was once a favorite but IMO it had outlived it's original premise years ago. What started out as an informative do it yourself show eventually morphed into just another boring big expensive project format. I quit watching it years ago although I would occasional pause on the show while surfing just to confirm that it was still boring.
 
  #6  
Old 02-03-16, 04:26 PM
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I agree, cw. Bob Vila left TOH when they left the average homeowner doing "sweat equity" and moved to high-end remodels of homes with huge yards and located on rivers. Vila stated that these homes were so far out of reach of average people that neither he nor an average person could even relate.

It was the very same thing on Hometime. I think the last two homes that I could relate to were the upgrading of Jud's (the old bearded guy who was a regular) basement to a welding shop for his metal sculptures and the rebuilding of JoAnne's garage with a yoga studio on the second level. One of the things I learned, that I thought was a darn good idea is when they put up Durock (cement board) on the walls of Jud's shop because it was virtually fireproof (from welding sparks), inexpensive and fairly immune to damage.

Now how many of us could afford to move out of our homes during a remodel? Even the latest episode of Ask TOH where the red-headed kid helped the homeowner paint the kitchen cabinets she admitted to moving out (or perhaps not moving in) during the remodel. And using $100 a gallon paint (how much?) when the plan was to rip out all the cabinets in 3-5 years anyway. While I admit the kitchen DID look a whole lot better after the paint it was completely functional before the paint. If it had been me I certainly could, and would, live with the existing until I was ready to replace the cabinets.
 
  #7  
Old 02-03-16, 04:42 PM
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I will watch TOH occasionally but you are right. The show went from Bob Villa and Norm Abrams helping regular homeowners with DIY projects to a showcase of high end remodels with an army of tradesmen, architects, and designers and an apparently unlimited budget.
 
  #8  
Old 02-03-16, 08:46 PM
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I agree with you Joel about Ask This Old House I thought that the $100.00 per gallon paint was way over the top. You are right too it did look better but they said the paint would have a rough texture, I bet that would be a real bear to keep clean. I also agree about those Hometime episodes you talked about with Joann Liebler and Judd Nelson's garage project. I also liked some of the cabin projects in the woods although I couldn't entirely relate to them as I don't have a cabin in the woods, still though they were enjoyable to watch.

In recent years though with my Roku I haven't watched a great deal of home improvement shows except those that air at a convenient time on Sunday. My favorite being Today's Homeowner that doesn't really pretend to be something it isn't. Of course it has ads but I don't mind them and I do learn about new products.
 
  #9  
Old 02-04-16, 12:09 AM
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I also watch Danny Lipford's show (Today's Homeowner) when I can as it is definitely geared towards the average homeowner. Unfortunately, while the channel it is broadcast on in my area is usually clear when I set my video recorder it is often a broken picture when it actually airs. I'm hoping that when I finally get all the materials (guy wires and brackets) to properly mount my antenna I will be able to overcome those problems. (The mast fell over several weeks ago and the antenna is pointing to the ground. I haven't attempted to fix it because I have only lost a few channels that I rarely watched anyway.)
 
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Old 02-04-16, 02:46 AM
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I thought that the $100.00 per gallon paint was way over the top. You are right too it did look better but they said the paint would have a rough texture
Anyone know what paint they used? Can't imagine why they would purposely apply a coating to cabinets that would have a texture They should have called me, might have been cheaper
 
  #11  
Old 02-04-16, 06:29 AM
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Here is the episode. Watch Full Episodes Online of Ask This Old House on PBS | Ask This Old House | Attic Stairs, Paint Cabinet painting segment starts at 13:50

The credits at the end mention Reclaim Beyond Paints, never heard of it but here is their website.

Reclaim Beyond Paint | DIY furniture painting

I suspect it is more of a stipple finish than an actual texture. Should clean up okay with Simple Green and a sponge.
 
  #12  
Old 02-04-16, 11:14 AM
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I guess that paint will clean up o.k. but still with any kind of texture at all it will not really look right close up and might not be as easy to clean. Personally if I was to go anywhere to get paint it might be either Sherwin Williams or the Home Depot both of which would have a cheaper and better paint in my opinion.
 
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Old 02-04-16, 11:42 AM
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I'm skeptical that a water based coating will adhere as well as they state. From the video I'd expect most of the texture/stipple is from using a roller. It would be interesting to see what those cabinets look like 6 months later. I'd rather go with the proven method to paint cabinets.
 
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Old 02-04-16, 04:29 PM
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marksr how about a water based paint for an old table? Off topic I know but I am getting ready to make a bigger table smaller and paint it. I would prefer to use a water based paint than an oil base if possible.
 
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Old 02-05-16, 02:31 AM
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What is currently on the table? If it has an oil base finish [paint or poly] it's best to sand and apply 1 coat of oil base [or pigmented shellac] primer before switching to latex or waterborne enamel.
 
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Old 02-05-16, 06:01 AM
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I'm old fashioned in that for almost everything other than interior walls and ceilings I prefer an oil-based paint. Then again, I try to avoid painting as much as possible.

My daddy, who was a painter, told me on several different occasions that if I had ever shown the slightest tendency to "follow in his footsteps" he would have cheerfully broken both my arms. Quite simply, I detest painting.

Here's another story. I was working in a shop that built wooden boats for the Alaskan fishing industry. (My firstr real job out of high school.) We had an old guy (in his seventies) that would come around and pound a few nails and sweep the floor. He was fairly useless but a really nice old coot so the owner not only put up with Louie but even paid him minimum wage. Louie didn't have anyone else to associate with so it was a good job for him to avoid becoming a bitter old recluse.

One day Louie said to the painter, "When I get to the point where I can't do anything else, I'll become a painter." Al cheerfully replied, "You can start any day, Louie!

One thing I dislike more than painting is people with the attitude that painting is, at best, a semi-skilled trade. I invite anyone with this attitude to try to keep up with a skilled painter for even a few hours. Yeah, I make lots of points with painters.
 

Last edited by Furd; 02-05-16 at 06:18 AM.
  #17  
Old 02-05-16, 01:45 PM
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I enjoy painting myself when I get a chance, the table has some kind of stain on it with a matte finish I probably will use oil but I really don't like using it but I will if I have to. I definitely will sand the table lightly though before applying any finish.
 
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Old 06-02-16, 07:59 PM
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I Just Cannot Believe It!

A million '+' dollar home, with custom made and installed 'EVERYTHING', and you put in 'CHEAP' imported, particle board closet organizers, (with 'pin and cam' joints) in such a home!!

It's time to retire!
 
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Old 06-09-16, 05:18 AM
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you put in 'CHEAP' imported, particle board closet organizers, (with 'pin and cam' joints) in such a home!!
LOL. I have to agree with you on this. However, that's how most furniture is made today. The only defense for this concerning a closet organizer is that once it's built and placed in its location they will be as good as any custom made unit and serve the same purpose.
 
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