happy deer, mad wife

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  #1  
Old 03-01-16, 12:42 PM
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happy deer, mad wife

Years ago I planted crocuses under a dog wood tree near the top of my driveway. Every year my wife gets excited when they pop up. She has been admiring them the last few days but when we got ready to go out this morning they were all gone - I assume a deer ate them. She's not too fond of venison but she was ready to go deer hunting
 
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Old 03-01-16, 01:48 PM
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Just remind her that it is all part of god's plan. God caused the flowers to grow and god led the deer to the flowers.
 
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Old 03-01-16, 04:55 PM
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On a 1 mile stretch of road coming out of town one of our local officers commented he had counted about 60 deer in the early morning hours enjoying their breakfast of gardens, flowers, and shrubs. Many of the homes up here have hour glass shaped shrubs where the deer keep the tender greens trimmed back up to as high as they can reach. You may need to post some "do not eat" signs .

Bud
 
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Old 03-02-16, 04:12 AM
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God caused the flowers to grow and god led the deer to the flowers.
And He gave us the power to hunt those deer so we can have venison.
 
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Old 03-02-16, 04:29 AM
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And He gave us the power to hunt those deer so we can have venison
I agree with that Norm201 and while I am not a hunter I have nothing but praise for those that thin the herds down since they have very few predators anymore. There are other methods though that may work even better than hunting the deer. One method is netting and on the same theme a fence made of materials like the netting. Another method is getting them wet and yet another is to use various types of sprays some made with hot peppers and some made with eggs.

I am not sure if you have seen this video of Roger Cooks of Ask This Old House where he gives tips on deer management here is the link How to Deer-proof Shrubs | Video | This Old House . I thought it was very informative myself and shows some of the ways of prevention being demonstrated that I mentioned. We don't have any deer in our immediate area but in some places nearby the deer are quite a problem.
 
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Old 03-02-16, 04:33 AM
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We had venison for dinner last night. It was yummy. I've never tried eating crocus. How does it taste?
 
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Old 03-02-16, 05:04 AM
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I also love venison, never tried crocus but the deer must of thought it was tasty as he ate every sprout/flower.

The deer don't bother me this time of year but when it comes time to plant the garden
 
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Old 03-02-16, 07:16 AM
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A forward thinking thought. We have a terrible Lyme problem up here and deer are one of the carriers of the tick that spreads it. It is so bad they are cutting back on the number of moose that can be taken due to winter kill due to the same ticks.

There was an article last year about using an insecticide, I think I mentioned this in a mouse control thread, but you create a feeding station where they will rub against the insecticide and eliminate their infestation. The thinking ahead part is, if you don't have the Lyme now you soon will and taking steps to control it in your local area may slow the introduction.

I will be doing something similar for the mice with cotton or cloth strips treated and placed where they can find it and use it for nesting. Yes I could trap them, but I could never eliminate them all, so cleaning up those in my local area may help.

Bud
 
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Old 03-02-16, 01:40 PM
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We have apple and pear trees and deer are almost daily visitors. Whenever we get a heavy snow cover my wife "encourages" me to feed the deer. I toss out some apples and double up on the seed we put out for the birds. Then in the spring when she sees the damage they have done to her plants shrubs she gets mad and vows not to feed them any more. Until the next winter.

It doesn't bother me at all. I figure that I've eaten so many of them that I owe a little.
 
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Old 03-02-16, 02:44 PM
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I tried to add this to my last post - a typical winter day when I have put birdseed and apples out.
Lots of tasty cuts there.
 
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Old 03-02-16, 02:48 PM
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That pic makes me think I don't have a big enough freezer
I don't think I've ever seen more than 3-4 deer at a time on my property, not sure I've seen more than 6-7 at a time anywhere around here.
 
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Old 03-02-16, 03:44 PM
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I took the photo from my deck. The apple tree is about 20 yds from the door. The most we have seen at one time was 12. They visit all year for drops from the trees and grass but except for hard winters they leave most of our plants alone. I have pics of some serious bucks including a 12pt non typical and a couple of piebald/albinos.

I don't think many people equate CT with deer hunting, but I grew up hunting in VT and ME and I think the deer population in my part of the state is greater than either one. The only place I've seen deer thicker is SC.
 
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Old 03-02-16, 03:59 PM
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Bud,
My wife has had Lyme disease twice. Both cases were successfully treated with antibiotics. I think that your moose tick problem is caused by a different critter. The winter tick (dermacentor albipictus) has been around for ages but the population (and impact) has been increasing, possibly due to climate change. I don't believe that the winter tick has been identified as a vector for Lyme. However, it is raising hell with the moose population. Google "winter tick" it's a real eye opener.

The deer tick (ixodes scapularis) is responsible for the majority (if not all) of the Lyme disease infections. I usually remove a half dozen imbedded dog ticks every year - no Lyme disease, but I am very careful to check for the much less common (at least around here) deer ticks.
 
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Old 03-02-16, 04:34 PM
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I didn't think the moose were infested with the same deer tick, just that their problem has grown to actually be affecting their population. I found a small tick on my arm that shocked me. It was crawling and hadn't attached but was less than 1/16th of an inch. How the H are we supposed to find those on ourselves or a dogs. A vet up here said about 25% of the dogs are infected with Lyme.

The article I read talked about mice, squirrels, and groundhogs as also bringing the ticks into our yards. I went digging and found the article i referenced.
How the pros kill ticks: Unwitting mice and deer get a dose of bug spray | Vital Signs

I'm currently saving old clothing and such to cut up and treat so I can leave it in various places around my yard. Just have to find a source of the Fipronil.

Bud
 
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