You can't make this stuff up

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  #1  
Old 03-13-16, 07:45 AM
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You can't make this stuff up

My wife almost fell off her chair laughing when I related this incident at work yesterday.

I'm at the paint department when a young (to me at least) lady asked to have some paint mixed. I've waited on her before. She's pleasant. About mid to late thirties, attractive. We make idle talk while I mix the color. As I seal the paint can to give it to her she asked, "Do you mind if I ask how old you are?" I cheerily say 66. She then says, "Are you married?" (I do not wear a wedding ring due to safety and comfort, never did and the Missus understands and does not mind.) Again I cheerily say yes, but with a questioning reply. (Now you can only imagine what thoughts are going through my head at that instant. The whole spectrum from OMG to WOW it's my lucky day.) Then with a crest fallen expression she says to me, "I was hoping to find someone for my Mother."
I stood there stunned! As she walked away she said I hope you didn't mind me asking. I just blurted out that she made my day.

Needless to say the boss and crew all got a big kick out this one.
 

Last edited by Norm201; 03-13-16 at 09:46 AM.
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  #2  
Old 03-13-16, 08:00 AM
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I would still take it as a compliment, she obviously thought you were a nice, good looking guy.
 
  #3  
Old 03-13-16, 09:07 AM
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Lol...a buddy of mine used to lament how guys, once reaching a certain age, become completely invisible to attractive women. You proved that it's not completely true.....
 
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Old 03-13-16, 09:36 AM
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she obviously thought you were a nice, good looking guy
I could never understand how women view men as attractive (especially myself). To me all men with few exceptions are not pleasant to look at from a "sexual" standpoint (and that has nothing to do with a gay or homo slant). Women can easily look at other women in a sexual way without any sense of home sexuality or lesbianism. Of course my sense of "good looking" is a generation past. People like Cary Grant, Robert Redford and Paul Newman strike me as being the few attractive men that I would say are pleasing to look at. But I guess that's just me.
 
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Old 03-14-16, 03:59 PM
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I could never understand how women view men as attractive (especially myself). To me all men with few exceptions are not pleasant to look at...
...People like Cary Grant, Robert Redford and Paul Newman strike me as being the few attractive men that I would say are pleasing to look at. But I guess that's just me.
We (mankind) like to think of ourselves as evolved creatures, free from the "instincts" (and instinctual behavior) of the lesser beasts, but that's just not the case. We have any number of common behaviors, things that all people are born knowing how to do. Every "lost tribe" ever discovered, even the ones that presumedly had never had any contact with the outside world before, EVER, people still laugh and smile when something makes them happy.

There's lots of them, in fact, like all humans tend to get a flush of several different hormones whenever they come into close contact with a baby. And not necessarily a human baby, but pretty much any animal with the physical characteristics we identify with infants, a disproportionately big head, big eyes and small nose. These hormones make us feel kindly disposed toward babies, nurturing and protective of them.


Likewise, we all of us are hard-wired to find certain physical characteristics "attractive" in the opposite sex. Many of the qualities we associate with "beauty," things like symmetry of facial features, a smooth and 'glowing' complexion, shiny, bouncy hair, are secondary indicators of good health and, by extension, of the potential for bearing healthy babies.

There've been studies concluding that every time a man encounters a woman, it takes him 1/2 of one second to assess (subconsciously) her suitability as a breeding partner. Even if we've conditioned ourselves not to do the math consciously, it still goes on inside our head just the same, in the dark corners where the caveman still lives.

A man's first biological imperative is to make as many more just like himself as he possibly can. Johnny Applesperm. And he can get away with that strategery because his participation is only absolutely necessary at the act of conception.

But wimmen are different. They will be more cautious, more circumspect in their mate selection because a woman innately understands that conception is only the first in a long series tasks that will require her (more or less) constant involvement, and that will take around two decades to play out. Because she doesn't measure her breeding success like a man does, by how many babies she can produce, or even in how many she can rear to adulthood. She measures it by how many of her offspring go on to have children of their own. By how many grand-babies she in time will have been responsible for.

Through the ages, a woman historically had to rely on the father of her children both for their collective physical security, as well as for their essential material needs of life. Her babies are less likely to grow up to have babies of their own if there isn't a brawny, hairy, smelly beast of a man hanging around to protect them from other brawny, hairy, smelly beasts. And to keep them all fed and clothed. And the women who were most successful as mothers were the ones who considered these realities when chosing a mate.

So while it might be easier to catch a woman's eye, at least initially, if you look like Brad Pitt, the man who she's most likely to lift her skirt for will be the one who, upon further inspection, she finds makes her feel safe, and shows promise to be a good provider.

Men might rag on wimmen for it, maybe even calling it "gold-digging," but the roots of it are instinctual. Because she's looking out for them grandbabies, and in that respect, a man's looks are of secondary importance to his drive to protect and provide.
 
  #6  
Old 03-15-16, 03:06 AM
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I heard it said that a lucky man is one that can earn more money than his wife can spend and a lucky woman is one that can find such a man. Personally I'm not convinced such a thing is possible
 
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