Columns w/ or w/o capitals.

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  #1  
Old 03-23-16, 09:46 AM
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Columns w/ or w/o capitals.

Sort of a random thought, while looking around the room.



Why does it seem like you almost never see capitals on columns like these?
 
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Old 03-23-16, 11:20 AM
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Ummm... because they're ugly?
 
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Old 03-23-16, 11:25 AM
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Sorry for being ignorant, but what do you mean by capitals?
 
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Old 03-23-16, 12:14 PM
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Capitals are the decorative component usually found atop a column. The come in 3 basic flavors - Doric, Ionic and Corinthian named for the capitals found on ancient architecture. https://www.google.com/search?q=colu...w=1536&bih=730
 
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Old 03-23-16, 12:24 PM
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OIC! Thanks!
So I guess it would depend on the style of the room or house, and how elaborate or not it is.
 
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Old 03-23-16, 12:27 PM
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Well, I was referring to just the one in your picture. In a house, they seem to be too much; out front of a huge building like an office plaza or government building seems to be better scale.
 
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Old 03-23-16, 12:57 PM
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A column is free standing, like a post. What you have is not a column.
You could trim out the top with crown molding, but I wouldn't call the crown a capital.

I would say a capital covers all four sides of a square post or the entire perimeter of a round post.
360
 
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Old 03-23-16, 01:05 PM
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That's a column. The other half and the other half of the capital are on the other side of the wall.

I was just wondering why since most of the time we see columns without capitals

Edit: same building different room:
 
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Old 03-23-16, 02:24 PM
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I concur with Brian. Inside a structure a column does not necessarily need a capital. But crown molding is quite common depending on the style of the architecture. If everything else in terms of architecture is clean lines with no decorative moldings along the ceiling, then crown molding and especially capitals are not needed.

The picture provided looks like the architect wanted free flowing lines to blend into the ceiling.
 
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Old 03-23-16, 10:50 PM
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Now that I see the other picture this looks to me to be a public library somewhere perhaps in a small town. Oftentimes in small towns libraries are not very ornate however if you go into a large town or city like Washington D.C. for instance you will see very ornate architecture. I take as one classic example the Library Of Congress which has very ornate capitals. So it depends very much in where you live, most countries do have very ornate buildings but they may be far away. In this country most of our libraries are not as ornate as the Library Of Congress is.
 
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Old 03-28-16, 07:56 AM
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I was mainly curious about the structural concerns. That "capital" is clearly a structural element you can seen the grain of the framing boards. But in most cases when you see structural columns they either intersect with a beam or are directly tied into the floor above.
 
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