Most you ever paid for a meal

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  #1  
Old 08-15-16, 03:21 PM
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Most you ever paid for a meal

Whats the most you ever paid for a meal, and what was it?
 
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  #2  
Old 08-15-16, 03:24 PM
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Probably about $25 for a steak dinner. That includes an appetizer of fried mushrooms. I think for 3 people, about $75 for steak dinners.
 
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Old 08-15-16, 03:31 PM
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Maybe about 28 dollars for a steak dinner at a steak house. Generally speaking though I prefer the cheaper places to dine at than something more expensive.
 
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Old 08-15-16, 05:20 PM
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$20 to $30 would be just eating out, no special location. I attach a different meaning to dining out usually at a very special place. When we lived in NJ about 40 years ago we went to one of those special places, you know no prices on the menu. 4 of us and a variety of food I couldn't pronounce, it was good. But even though we were out for a special occasion with special friends $400 with the tip (for all 4 of us) was the last time I will do that.

In central Maine I prefer just eating out for both price and the food. Lobster is a bit more.

Bud
 
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Old 08-15-16, 05:49 PM
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I hate spending a lot of money on food. As My Father in law would say "it will all make a turd" and he is right.

That said I guess spending $25 - $28 per meal taking my dad out for Prime Rib is not out of the question.
 
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Old 08-15-16, 06:30 PM
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About 20 years ago, my wife and I, along with my sister and her husband, were vacationing in Switzerland. We had (barely) gotten over sticker shock at the food prices. Just for grins we stopped into a McDonalds. A coke was the equivalent of $3.50 (remember...20 years ago). When we traveled together (which we did fairly often back then) we would pick one night for a special meal. So on the chosen night we went to dinner at a charming little chalet restaurant high on one of the "hills". We all had the specialty, which was Wiener Schnitzel. It was prepared table side using about a pound of butter. We had a salad, some side dish I don't recall, and split a bottle of Riesling. The tab for the four of us was close to $500. It was the only splurge of the trip and at the time and to this day it was worth every penny. The food was absolutely wonderful, but the locale, the ambience and celebrating with good friends was what made it special. Don't know what it would be in today's dollars, but I remember that it was about half of the total we spent on food for the whole 2 week trip.
 
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Old 08-15-16, 06:48 PM
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Probably spent $150 to $200 at most for 4 people.
It wasn't a fancy restaurant, it was one of those where the servings are so big it's ridiculous.
The prime rib and baked potato are huge.
If you order the pork tenderloin, it's a roast that could feed a family of five.
It's crazy but fun once in a while.
I was in Texas near Austin and did the same thing, order a lot of BBQ.
I didn't understand Texans took their brisket and ribs seriously and we had more BBQ than you could possibly eat. Good stuff and everyone had fun.
 
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Old 08-15-16, 07:35 PM
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I have fond memories of eating at the Salt Lick in Austin when I used to travel there on business...great BBQ Texas style. The brisket was awesome!
 
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Old 08-15-16, 07:44 PM
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Recently, I had to meet 2 of my brothers, one of whom brought his wife, my sister & her husband. The restaurant was too expensive, for my liking. At the end of the dinner, the brother without his wife said that he & my sister would cover the bill as long as my other brother & I would pay the tip. The tip was $60. Including my drinks, I still had to pay $60. What was worse was that I was constantly looking over my shoulder, for terrorists. My sister said not to worry since she had the door covered. Since then, I bought some Chinese throwing stars. Practice will start soon.
 
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Old 08-16-16, 03:25 AM
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About 20 yrs ago I painted a doctor's house. They had hired a decorator that chose 15-20 colors. Normally I could spray the primer in a house that size in less than a day but after a long day I still wasn't finished. Showed up the next morning and the doc was already there with a change order, they had fired the decorator and picked just 4-5 colors. Besides paying for the extra cost in changing colors he gave me a $50 gift certificate to a fancy restaurant. We had originally thought about taking another couple but then my wife heard how expensive that restaurant was. I had to cough up another $20 or so to pay the bill/tip .... and at that time we rarely paid $20 for the 2 of us to go out and eat.
 
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Old 08-16-16, 02:10 PM
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Including wine and tip - $600 plus for 4 people. Fine dining usually reserved for special occasions just once or twice a year. Typically for the two of us we might spend $100 - $150 on dinner out once or twice a month.

Dinner for 4 at the Palace Arms in Denver several years ago came to nearly $800 but I wasn't paying.
 
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Old 08-17-16, 05:43 AM
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Burned a Franklin for dinner for two (wife & I) circa summer 1980 at The 95th, on the 95th floor of the Hancock building in Chicago.
 
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Old 08-17-16, 06:06 AM
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No matter how good the food, if the price is exorbitant, it's not enjoyable. If the price is not on the menu then it's not worth the price! Then add a tip? No not for me. This past weekend treated my two son's and family's to dinner at the Red House Inn in Allegheny State Park. Six people and one infant, $115.00. Most enjoyable.

I like the European way of restaurant pricing. NO TIP. Pay your help a livable wage and raise your price accordingly. Then we all know what we need to pay and all the help (including the cook and dishwasher) get a fair wage. I've noticed some US restaurants are doing this and it seems to be successful.
 
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Old 08-17-16, 07:08 AM
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The memories are far more important than the price. A few years ago the wife and I were eating out at a local seafood restaurant and i noticed a middle ages gentleman across from us. He had ordered the twin lobster dinner and was really enjoying it. When he finished the waitress asked if he wanting anything else and he replied, "do it again". They picked up his dishes and a few minutes later served him his second course. Probably vacationing in Maine and wanted his fill of Lobster.

That was a meal he will surely remember and the price was never part of it.

Bud
 
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Old 08-17-16, 08:24 AM
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Your absolutely right, price does not equate to enjoyable food. So why does one need to pay a high price for an enjoyable meal? My meal with the family was the best I had in years and it only cost me a small amount.

But I guess if you're rich, price means nothing in terms of food or any other item.
 
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Old 08-17-16, 09:34 AM
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Don't expect to see Bill & Hillary or Donald when we eat at the local Perkins on Friday nights.
 
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Old 08-17-16, 09:53 AM
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If you are talking about great food at a great price then you need to go to my neck of the woods. There is a place called the New York Deli that isn't franchised and has the most wonderful country fried steak you can buy. Best of all too they deliver so you don't have to go to them unless you want to. The place from the outside isn't much to look at and until recently the tables were not that great as they hadn't been replaced in years. The place though is clean and about all of the food I have eaten there I liked and the people are nice too.
 
  #18  
Old 08-17-16, 01:34 PM
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A tip is usually included in the bill as a "service charge", typically as much as 15%. Even so it is customary to leave a few coins on the table. Now tipping is becoming more commonplace in Europe although it varies from country to country.
 
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Old 08-17-16, 01:54 PM
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Dinner at an expensive restaurant is more than just going out to eat. It is an entertainment experience from start to finish best shared with friends. For us it's usually a way to celebrate a special occasion. I can remember every dinner I have had at a fine restaurant but I can't say the same for eating at Olive Garden or Billy Bob's Burgers.


And yes, fine dining does produce a more sophisticated turd.
 
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Old 08-17-16, 02:51 PM
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With me just the opposite. Our best and most fun dinners have been at places like the Olive Garden. You don't need to be prim and proper. A little bit of table talk that might be slightly loud but not so much as to bother other diners. Usually the food is good.

New York tax is 7% to 9% so we generally double that for a tip. If exceptional service is provided then a bit more.

What I don't like are places where you have to use the right fork or spoon at the right time with the right food and have the proper wine to match the dinner. Or subdued lighting so you can't see what you're eating. I don't need or want a candle to eat by. I like white wine (or a beer), my wife likes red wine. We order what we like regardless of the type of food.

And I certainly dislike a restaurant that automatically decides the tip and adds it to the bill.

What does burn my behind, is when kids are so loud and untrained that they ruin a dinner for other guest. :NO NO NO:

And about once every two months I enjoy a Burger King or McDonalds. But no more often than that. Occasionally we'll get a Denny's breakfast.

All that being said both my wife and I are not big restaurant people. Too often and all the food taste the same no matter where you go. We prefer a home cooked meal even if it's just soup. But on the rare occasion that we do go out we really enjoy it. I'm certainly in the minority.
 
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Old 08-18-16, 08:21 AM
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We prefer a home cooked meal...
Hard to beat a good pot roast, carrots with mashed potatoes and gravy.
 
  #22  
Old 08-18-16, 08:59 AM
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True. And again I'm in the minority, but I like my meat, be it steak, pork chops or anything to be well done! I mean WELL DONE!
 
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Old 08-18-16, 11:39 AM
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I'm a medium-well guy, anything pinker than that and it's going back.
 
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Old 08-18-16, 11:47 AM
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You loose too much taste when the steak is over cooked, medium rare works for me
Of course any meat other than red meat does need to be fully cooked
 
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Old 08-18-16, 01:34 PM
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When I was in the family business we used to go to trade shows (like in Chicago) and really "spend the nickle". We had to wine and dine the buyers for the major retail chain stores. One of my favorite places because I love steak so much was either Morgan's Steak House or Ruth's Chris Steak House. Morgans they would roll the chart out to your table with raw meat on it showing you the cuts of meat for the evening. Well aged, well prepared and absolutely delicious; that is for both Morgans and Ruth's Chris. A single steak no "sides" at Ruth's Chris is about $35 to $55 depending on what you order. Sides (for one person) like fresh asparagus with hollandaise sauce is about $12, baked potato about $8. But the taste is far beyond what I could describe if you like steak. 30 times better than OutBack Steak House. We also dined at some other restaurants in Chicago that served fresh home made pasta etc (Italian restaurants) where the bills were astronomical. Traveling to Hong Kong and eating at some of the upper scale restaurants also were great but very expensive. Hold a "match" under my steak and it may be a bit well done for me. Hee Hee Hee. Not good to eat meat like that but I don't eat it that often. My mom raised me on "steak tartare" ---Steak tartare is a meat dish made from finely chopped or minced raw beef or horsemeat. It is often served with onions, capers and seasonings, sometimes with a raw egg yolk, and often on rye bread--- Wow was it good!!!! My mom and dad taught me to "live to eat" and not "eat to live".
I hate fast food, yuk!! May eat it like twice a year if it is forced down my throat. I am a bachelor and cook my own meals almost every night. Can't afford to go out to those pricey restaurants anymore though. Sold the family business a ways back.
 
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Old 08-18-16, 02:10 PM
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The restaurant I worked at during high school served steak tartare, the main chef was the only one that was allowed to prepare it .... not sure if he had to be certified or what.

Hold a "match" under my steak and it may be a bit well done for me.
Generally I like my steaks medium rare but about 40 yrs ago the best steak I ever ate was venison that a friend had bagged that morning, came over and woke me up to help him dress it. Not having ate breakfast by the time we were done I was famished. I went in the house and put a skillet on the fire, set most of the meat in the freezer, set a steak in the skillet, got a plate, flipped the steak and got a glass of milk ..... and I didn't want to wait any longer best steak I've ever eaten!!
 
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Old 08-18-16, 02:49 PM
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The restaurant I worked at during high school served steak tartare, the main chef was the only one that was allowed to prepare it .... not sure if he had to be certified or what.
May have been had to be certified. But mom knew the butcher very well and made sure the meat was fresh. Man, I really could dig into that back then.

Hold a "match" under my steak and it may be a bit well done for me.
Generally I like my steaks medium rare but about 40 yrs ago the best steak I ever ate was venison that a friend had bagged that morning, came over and woke me up to help him dress it. Not having ate breakfast by the time we were done I was famished. I went in the house and put a skillet on the fire, set most of the meat in the freezer, set a steak in the skillet, got a plate, flipped the steak and got a glass of milk ..... and I didn't want to wait any longer best steak I've ever eaten!!
Sounds good to me; oh, I hope it was a cast iron skillet you used and not one of those cheapie ones you buy at walmart. Cast iron cooks the best beef around. Yum!!
 
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Old 08-18-16, 04:54 PM
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Trying to convey why I think fine (expensive) dining is worth it.

On our 35th anniversary we had dinner in a rooftop garden restaurant in Rome. Just a few hundred yards away was St Peter's Basillica, fully lighted and absolutely awesome. That view alone is memory that will stay with me forever. A view that was certainly a part of the dinner bill.However, I also remember the perfectly cooked (rare) 2" thick double veal chop.

The point being that these are experiences that stick with you. Sure they cost more but any pinch from the money spent fades with time. The memory doesn't. We are far from rich, but long ago we decided that when we travel or vacation we always budget in something outrageously exhorbitant, be it dinner or greens fees or shopping. I usually save my pocket change just for dining out.

I too am a Ruth's Chris steak fan. My favorite is in Honolulu. Hard to get out of there without spending a couple of bills.
 
  #29  
Old 08-18-16, 05:12 PM
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I too am a Ruth's Chris steak fan. My favorite is in Honolulu. Hard to get out of there without spending a couple of bills.
Glad to see I have a "partner" with Ruth's Chris. Yummy steaks. Well worth the money.

Anyway, yes, the experience is what we all talk about, not just the food. You are so right. Keeping the experience and event in our mind for years to come when the taste of the food fades is what it is all about. Simply saying, I love to camp. A fresh caught trout with griddle pancakes and corn fritters made at the fire-side CAN equate to a view while eating dinner on the Canadian side of Niagra Falls at night all lit up anytime.

Just how you look at it and how you look back and remember what meant the most to you at the time.
 
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Old 08-18-16, 05:56 PM
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Nothing can replace fine dining, but I'm a big fan of gas convection ovens. You can have a special dinner at home and cook like a chef. Meat and poultry can be cooked to perfection, crispy or darkened on the outside and tender inside.
A prime rib will probably set you back $50.00 but will feed quite a few.

The convection ovens are expensive. There are counter top models that are very popular in Asia and don't cost much. They are called Turbo Ovens and do an excellent job of cooking poultry.
 
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