Idioms

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  #1  
Old 11-15-16, 09:01 AM
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Idioms

Not idiots, idioms.

What does "clean cut" mean when referring to a person? Are some people dirty cut? What are the visual clues?

Some people are opinionated; others have no opinions at all. Which is more interesting?

If a person is selfless does it mean he/she has no sense of self?

Why is it that a know-it-all is generally a person that knows little?


Any more?
 
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  #2  
Old 11-15-16, 09:04 AM
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Ok, I'll play along Country mile - is it not the same distance as any other mile?
 
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Old 11-15-16, 09:10 AM
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Isn't a know-it-all a jack-of-all-trades but master of none
 
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Old 11-15-16, 09:29 AM
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No, I think a know-it-all and a jack-of-all-trades are two different animals!

A k-i-a thinks they're knowledgeable about every subject and only they are right, but it's all mental things, not work related.

A j-o-a-t has some knowledge about several work things but not enough to be a master of one.
 
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Old 11-15-16, 03:08 PM
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I started this really wanting some answers rather than more idioms. I have seen and heard the term "clean cut" all my life but I have no idea what it means. Is it a well-groomed person? Or perhaps someone with high morals? Both? Can't shabby-looking people have high morals?

I have unruly hair, way too long right now, and I haven't worn a suit and/or necktie in more than twenty years. Although I detest facial hair I haven't shaved in about three days. I have on a religious (holey, but not holy) T-shirt and sweat pants along with worn-out slippers. In addition, I am morbidly obese and my feet stink so I'm pretty sure that no one would call me "clean cut" but would anyone call me dirty cut? I do consider myself well-educated and a person of high moral character but these things are invisible and cannot be detected by visual appearance.


I've known people who have no opinion whatsoever on any subject. Speaking with them is extremely difficult and downright boring. Yet we use the term "opinionated" as a catchword that these people are closed-minded and impossible to talk with. In my experience it is the opinionated person that is far more interesting than the person with no opinions at all.
 
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Old 11-15-16, 03:33 PM
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What's another word for Thesaurus?
 
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Old 11-15-16, 04:24 PM
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I think clean cut means hair always cut and in place, shaven face and neatly dressed. Don't think it has anything to do with morals. Has to do with looks AFAIK.
 
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Old 11-15-16, 04:29 PM
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Oh and I think selfless is a person that thinks more of others than they do of themselves.

Yeah and the know it all only thinks they know it all!
 
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Old 11-16-16, 03:04 AM
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I think clean cut means hair always cut and in place, shaven face and neatly dressed
Oh oh I haven't shaved in over 40 yrs When working I prefer old clothes and stains on them don't bother me BUT I will dress nice if I go to town with my wife Ever since I went mostly bald my hair always stays in place!
 
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Old 11-16-16, 05:23 AM
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Hey Furd,

Did my post spark this? (referring to my co-work with not using the ground wire with electrical connections)

I agree with Shadeladie that "clean-cut" mean clean shaven and cropped hair, neat clothing and generally polite disposition. At least by my standards. And that might be the crux of the question. What standards have you been raised with? Those of us from the era labeled as baby boomers most likely have the same "picture" of clean cut (think Cary Grant look). But today's good look of men at least seems to be the rough look of one or two day unshaven, slightly must up hair and very casual clothing. Not unpleasant or dirty but not neat.
 
  #11  
Old 11-16-16, 06:19 AM
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Originally Posted by the_tow_guy
". . . What's another word for Thesaurus? . . ."
I don't think there is "one"; but your question reminds me of my favorite book;
Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms, a copy of which I've had with me for over 50 years.

On board ship floating across the Pacific and while In Country, I used to read it for pleasure, not necessarily in sequence, page by page, but bouncing around as one concept caused me to look up another.

People used to ask, "What's in that book that keeps you so occupied ?" . . . . and I'd reply:

"Words, just Words"

That book was originally copywritten in 1871, and my dog-eared copy was printed in 1961; but it's been one of my most valuable tools and a prized possession most of my life.

It's got everything (almost).
 
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Old 11-16-16, 07:22 AM
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If you're driving 60mph can you cover a country mile in a New York minute?
 
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Old 11-16-16, 09:35 AM
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Ever since I went mostly bald my hair always stays in place!
HA! That made me laugh!
 
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Old 11-16-16, 11:59 AM
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No, Norm, nothing anyone has written in the recent past influenced me to ask the question; it is one I have had for a very long time. I agree that when I think of the term "clean cut" I have a mental image of the Cary Grant style as well. The current fashion of disheveled hair and a three-day growth definitely does NOT evoke that image of "clean cut" in my mind.

I added the part about morals because the old standard was parents wanting their daughter to only date (and hopefully marry) a "clean cut young man" giving the impression (to me at least) that clean cut meant far more than appearance.

I asked about the other things because I am fascinated by words and language, especially so the words and phrases that seem to have little logic or literal meaning to them. I wanted to get others to comment on some of the words and phrases we all use without really thinking about them; how utterly without meaning many of them can be but are still used with most people thinking they know what they mean. Some of these have been mentioned like the country mile and the New York minute.

Here's another, "Fat as a hog." Just how fat IS a hog? Has anyone ever seen a skinny hog?
 
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Old 11-16-16, 12:08 PM
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When I think of country mile, I think of a long, leisurely drive, sight seeing in the country. So I think a country mile just seems longer and reflects that it might be a longer drive than if one's racing along in the city.
A New York minute means to me quick. Like when a minute whizz's by way too fast.

I'm more familiar with the term "fat as a house", which indicates someone weighs too much.

I think all these sayings do have logic and meaning. That's just my 2 cents.
 
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Old 11-16-16, 12:41 PM
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Then of course there are the four letter words that can have opposite meanings depending on the inflection used and the circumstances.
 
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Old 11-16-16, 01:31 PM
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A mile is 5,280 feet regardless of whether it is in the city or the country. A minute is 60 seconds no matter if it is in New York, Patterson or Seattle.

I love George Carlin's routine section on the "two-way" words. The words that can be "dirty on one context and perfectly acceptable in a different concept. Balls is one such word. It is perfectly acceptable to say, "Roberto Clemente has two balls on him." but you can't say, "I think he hurt his balls on that one. He's holding them, they must hurt!" Or, "We're going to snatch that ***** and put him in a box and take it on the airplane." There is another about pricking your finger but I'll not even try. (Let's see if this gets passed the auto censor.)

Aha, it won't let the word for a little kitty-cat through...
 
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Old 11-16-16, 04:25 PM
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Of course a mile is a mile and a minute is a minute. The idioms came about because of how they feel or what it seems like. You must not have much of an imagination.
 
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Old 11-17-16, 06:32 AM
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The phrase Eats Like A Bird. An idiom? Someone, often said whom is thin, eats like a bird. It's not a compliment as one would be inclined to think. Or so I heard. Contrary. Birds burn lots of calories flying. Therefore must forage for food sources and eat constantly.

Humans doing the same constant eating are often but not always, heavy or fat according to visual appearance. Only personally known of one person whom was thin but was a bigger eater as compared to the rest of us lunch bag, lunch bucket or often referred to as brown baggers...



My Two Pennies
 
  #20  
Old 11-17-16, 06:53 AM
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I'm especially fond of sailing idioms & phrases.

The bitter end.
Unfathomable.
Still waters run deep.
The cut of his jib.
Know the ropes.
Three sheets to the wind.
Cut & run.
Pooped.
 
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Old 11-17-16, 10:24 AM
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I've never been accused of eating like a bird. When I was young I was real skinny even though I ate breakfast twice every morning [once with my father and then again with my siblings] snacked between meals and always got seconds with lunch/supper. When I got on my own I'd take 5 sandwiches to work with me and would buy something off of the roach coach if I had the money. As a kid I was always told 'you have a hollow leg' or 'you must have a tape worm' I was just always hungry

Fast forward to today and while I eat significantly less - I'm overweight
 
  #22  
Old 11-17-16, 04:09 PM
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Shadeladie
You must not have much of an imagination.


I'm an engineer, I have a tremendous imagination. I also have a logical mind and trying to say a mile in the country is different than a mile in the city is illogical.


Here is another stupid saying.

"I paid good money for that!"
Unless you are knowingly passing counterfeit money isn't ALL money good?
 
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Old 11-17-16, 05:38 PM
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I'm an engineer, I have a tremendous imagination. I also have a logical mind and trying to say a mile in the country is different than a mile in the city is illogical.
So are you Mr. Spock or Sheldon?
 
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Old 11-18-16, 04:56 AM
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Bad analogy, shadie; neither are engineers.

Mr. Scott or Howard Wolowitz would be the question.
 
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Old 11-18-16, 05:35 AM
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I guess I was referring to the logical/illogical comment!
 
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