What next, a ticket for leaving your car door unlocked?

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  #1  
Old 01-09-17, 02:40 PM
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What next, a ticket for leaving your car door unlocked?

Guy gets a ticket for leaving his car running. The police chiefs reasoning - because it invites car thieves? LINK
 
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  #2  
Old 01-09-17, 02:50 PM
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My stepson used to do that and got his car stolen While I don't believe it should be a ticketable offense, commonsense should dictate that you lock the vehicle in this day and time.
 
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Old 01-09-17, 04:03 PM
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I had a car once that would not allow the doors to be locked if the keys were in the ignition and the transmission not in drive. Close the door and the lock would pop up Great for not locking your car keys in the ignition, but not so good in certain neighborhoods with car thieves running rampant.
 
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Old 01-09-17, 05:12 PM
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Last I knew if you leave your keys in the car, let alone leave it running, you are responsible for any resulting damage if it is stolen and your insurance may not pay for any of it. It is an issue up here in cold country where we often leave our cars running in the morning to warm up. I have to use a second key to lock my door after exiting with it running.

Bud
 
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Old 01-09-17, 07:26 PM
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In MN it is illegal to leave your car unattended running with the keys in the ignition and you can get a ticket for it. The work around is you use a remote starter. Then your keys are not in the ignition.
 
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Old 01-09-17, 09:08 PM
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In our state and the surrounding states and D.C it is illegal for a car to be left running and you will be fined. Apparently in the state in which that article was written their is no law against running a car empty of passengers but their should be one in every state for safety sake.
 
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Old 01-09-17, 11:22 PM
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Where would I fit in? Since the cylinder jammed up in my car and I had a locksmith drill it out 4 years ago, I can start and drive my car with a screwdriver or just use the tip of the key. No keys required. Here's the good part, I can still remote lock my doors AND set the alarm. So, my car is running, someone breaks a window and opens the door, and he drives off with the alarm blaring away? I think not.

And the reason the cylinder wasn't replaced is you have to pretty much remove the dash and drop the steering column. Who'd steal an ugly old Suzuki anyway?
 
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Old 01-10-17, 03:14 AM
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I had an old truck once with an ignition switch so worn out that you could pull the key out with it running. My son had one that didn't need a key, just grasp the ignition collar [?] and turn

My stepson had just mailed off the final payment for his 5 yr old Subaru when it got stolen. I'll always remember the thief's nickname - dirty dog. He stole the car, drove up on the mountain and set it on fire
 
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Old 01-15-17, 11:34 AM
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I'm showing my age here, but I recall that most older Chevies up until the mid-60's, had an ignition lock that you could start the engine without a key. Seems like the lock had an additional position, "lock" in addition to the usual off/on/start. If you removed the key in the off position without turning it to "lock", you could start the car without a key, just using the collar of the ignition switch. I don't know why that design was exclusive to Chevy and not GM as a whole.
 
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Old 01-15-17, 12:04 PM
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I do remember that key configuration Beachboy. It was used on up to about 1952 chevys. I had a '51, but we never locked the ignition, nor the doors. Didn't have to worry about car theft too much back then. It also allowed people at church to move your car if you were blocking them in
 
  #11  
Old 01-15-17, 12:19 PM
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I think it's important to note that this guy didn't leave it running in the 7 Eleven parking lot. It was in his girlfriend's private driveway.

I warm my car up in the garage often during the winter. Should that make me liable for a ticket? Maybe the cops should spend more time busting car thieves then ticketing civilians.
 
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Old 01-15-17, 01:54 PM
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This is my home town and sorry to say there are so many car jacking and people stealing cars that I fully support the cops intention. May look bad on the surface but the area this took place is not nice, cop was right on!!
 
  #13  
Old 01-15-17, 01:59 PM
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It isn't the police that are at fault, it is the courts. When the offense of stealing a car was changed to "joyriding" started it. When the Public Service Announcements berating those that left the key in the switch with the statement, "Don't help a good boy go bad." were played the whole thing was turned upside down.

Car theft should treated the same as horse theft was in the nineteenth century. At the very least it should be a felony and not dismissed as "joyriding". And no "good" boy EVER thought about stealing a car, even just for a ride.

I remember years ago while talking with some police officers they mentioned why they looked past so many cases of relatively minor crime. It was because the perps were so often released by the judges without any penalty whatsoever. After a while the prosecutors simply refuse to waste their time filing the cases and the police simply don't see the crimes at all. This emboldens the petty criminal into trying (and usually accomplishing bigger and bolder crimes.
 
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Old 01-16-17, 06:20 AM
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My question is why did the police approach an idling car in a private driveway in the first place? What "reasonable suspicion" in this day where remote start systems are so common?

Either the cop was over-reaching in his duties, or there's something left out of the story.
 
  #15  
Old 01-16-17, 03:45 PM
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in this day where remote start systems are so common
BUT, the difference there is that the car is locked when the remote is used to start the car vs a car sitting unlocked with the keys in the ignition.

Clearly the cop knows his cars or took the time to confirm.

Again I feel he did the right thing!
 
  #16  
Old 01-16-17, 03:54 PM
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Not necessarily true for cars with after market remote start.
 
  #17  
Old 01-16-17, 07:33 PM
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Should not be ticketable offense. But good sense on the police to check it out. Big brother should not punish stupid if it does not harm others.

On another but similar note, I understand that in some remote villages in Alaska and the Canadian Northwest that it's common practice to keep car doors unlocked so that a person can take shelter in the event of bears roaming the area.
 
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