What the old adage about woodworkers and table saws?

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Old 09-25-17, 10:46 PM
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What the old adage about woodworkers and table saws?

Isn't something like there are those who have been bit, and those who will be? Or is that bikers?

Anyway, I am now a part of the former group. No kickback or anything, even using a push stick near the blade. Just leaned over to hit the power and my other hand sort of went with the lean, my thumb was extended a bit and whaamo! 2 1/2 hrs in the ER and 12 stitches later, it really barely hurts now 9 hrs later. I've got drugs but may not need them if I can sleep.

I have pics before and after, but decided that might be a bit gross. From nail bed out and around to the middle of the pad and down at an angle about 1/2". Still bends and had a pulse, so no problems there.

Last ripped down piece before I could start putting together the lattice and then put the dash on the truck back together. Guess those are on hold for a while.
 
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Old 09-25-17, 10:55 PM
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I have been bitten too. About 10 years ago. Caught the tip of my forefinger. Not as bad as yours... just a few stitches.
 
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Old 09-26-17, 02:59 AM
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About 10 yrs or so ago, right after I lost the sight in my right eye I somehow sliced the very tip off of my right thumb. I'm still not sure how it happened as my hand wasn't that close to the blade. I spent 4 hrs in the ER although about 3.5 hrs was spent waiting. They did rush me thru the registration process. I don't remember if I got stitches but I had to go see a doc twice a week for a couple of weeks and then once a week until it was healed. Mostly it messed up the nerves in that thumb making it difficult to pick small items up ..... but we learn to compensate. Reminded me of my grandfather who was a carpenter back when the only power tool was a table saw and all the cuts were made free hand - he had more missing fingers than whole ones.

My wife was at work when this happened so when she came home a few days later she wanted to see my thumb as did my young grandson. He stood on the commode seat to get a good view, as soon as the bandage came off - he got gone!

Except when they scrubbed the wound at the ER I never really felt any pain - got to be thankful for the small things!
 
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Old 09-26-17, 05:00 AM
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So sorry to hear about your accident. It can happen to the best of us. Recover quickly. And have a beer and relax.

Safety never takes a vacation.

At work I'm in charge of screen repair and glass cutting. Although everyone is suppose to be able to cut glass for customers. I provide a set of gloves and goggles for all to use. Very few use them. It's just a matter of time!
 
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Old 09-26-17, 05:40 AM
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A buddy of mine, since passed, lost the tips of I think three fingers 4 or 5 winters ago. It was very cold at the time, and he was wearing a pair of gloves while helping another buddy of his do something on the table saw. The blade caught a loose thread and sucked his fingers right into the no go zone. It was sort of funny because his wife said that she thought the worst part for him was that he was going to have to tell me, and knew that I would admonish him for wearing gloves while using the saw. In other words, he knew better. But it was what it was, and regardless of the circumstances, a table saw has to be respected at all times. Norm, I do agree with wearing gloves when cutting glass. Not that I do it that often, but occasionally, and I usually wear my welding gloves, but have substituted a pair of canvas ones once in a while. All depends on the task; sometimes gloves are good and sometimes they're not so good.
 
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Old 09-26-17, 06:21 AM
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About 10 years ago I lost about 1/4 of meat off left thumb. That thumb still numb now.
 
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Old 09-26-17, 07:05 AM
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Gave myself a real good "manicure" on my right hand middle finger (yeah, that one!--so I couldn't even show the saw how I felt about it.) with a sanding wheel on a table saw and a thin piece of wood. The wood and the finger both got sucked into the gap between the blade and the insert. Went to the ER but did not require stitches. Now i make sure to have zero clearance inserts when needed and build lots of jigs to handle iffy situations.
 
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Old 09-26-17, 06:50 PM
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OUCH! Hope you heal up fast.

Have had a few kick backs, but not have been bitten, yet.
 
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Old 09-26-17, 07:03 PM
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Wow, sounds like you were lucky it wasn't any worse! Hope you have plenty of neosporin.

I got my left hand too close to the running blade of a 12" miter saw, and ran my hand right into the side of it... luckily that wasn't worse either... I yanked it away pretty fast but not before it put a slight notch in my thumb knuckle bone and made a 2" slice. All that's left now is the scar... it's a little tight when winter comes. I was lucky... did that many years ago when I was young and dumb.

Takes something like that to put the fear in ya.... i've been pretty cautious ever since!
 
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Old 09-26-17, 07:46 PM
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Funny thing was, the Doc had seen 2 other people with saw injuries in the last week, both worse than mine they said. One took his thumb half off and had to go to LV to see a re-attachment specialist. The other didn't even have contact with the blade. He was ripping and had a kickback and a raised knot (of all things) peeled a flap of skin off his forearm all the way to the elbow. Doc said the guy said the knot was only raised about 3/8" and was about 2" in diameter. I mean, I know knots can have a pretty sharp edge, but holy crud!
 
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Old 09-27-17, 06:40 AM
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My saw has the typical push on/push off buttons so I hung a 1x4 in front of the switch that extends to within a fraction of the floor. I sweep that with my foot as I near the end of a cut and keep both hands on the work. It feels much safer to me to shut off the saw and wait for the blade to stop before pushing the cutoff through to the rear of the saw.
 
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Old 09-27-17, 02:48 PM
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I like that idea or some variance of it. On mine, the switch cover just needs to be tapped to shut it off, but it's still down out of sight and requires a hand and body movement to get to. Something I could easily hit by lifting my foot a few inches makes lots of sense.
 
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Old 09-27-17, 02:57 PM
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My table saw has a guard on each side of the switch which makes it harder to accidentally turn it on. After my accident I started putting a nail thru it as an added precaution but have long since stopped doing so
 
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