Lost words and phrases

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  #1  
Old 03-28-18, 05:52 AM
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Lost words and phrases

Reveal your age. How many of you are familiar with these dated terms? I'm familiar with 95% of these.

Murgatroyd, remember that word? Would you believe the email spell checker did not recognize the word Murgatroyd?
Heavens to Murgatroyd!
Lost Words from our childhood: Words gone as fast as the buggy whip! Sad really!
The other day a not so elderly lady said something to her son about driving a Jalopy and he looked at her quizzically and said "What the heck is a Jalopy?"
OMG (new phrase)!
He never heard of the word jalopy!! She knew she was old.... but not that old.
Well, I hope you are Hunky Dory after you read this and chuckle.
About a month ago, I illuminated some old expressions that have become obsolete because of the inexorable march of technology.
These phrases included "Don't touch that dial," "Carbon copy," "You sound like a broken record" and "Hung out to dry."
Back in the olden days we had a lot of 'moxie.' We'd put on our best 'bib and tucker' to' straighten up and fly right'.
Heavens to Betsy! Gee whillikers! Jumping Jehoshaphat! Holy moley!
We were 'in like Flynn' and 'living the life of Riley''.
Even a regular guy couldn't accuse us of being a knucklehead, a nincompoop or a pill. Not for all the tea in China!
Back in the olden days, life used to be swell, but when's the last time anything was swell?
Swell has gone the way of beehives, pageboys and the D.A....... of spats, knickers, fedoras, poodle skirts, saddle shoes, penny loafers, and pedal pushers...AND DON'T FORGET... Saddle Stitched Pants
Oh, my aching back! Kilroy was here, but he isn't anymore.
We wake up from what surely has been just a short nap, and before we can say, Well, I'll be 'a monkey's uncle!'
Or, This is a 'fine kettle of fish'!
We discover that the words we grew up with, the words that seemed omnipresent, as oxygen, have vanished with scarcely a notice from our tongues and our pens and our keyboards.
Poof, go the words of our youth, the words we've left behind
We blink, and they're gone. Where have all those great phrases gone?
Long gone: Pshaw, The milkman did it. Hey! It's your nickel..
Don't forget to pull the chain. Knee high to a grasshopper. Well, Fiddlesticks! Going like sixty.
I'll see you in the funny papers. Don't take any wooden nickels. Wake up and smell the roses.
It turns out there are more of these lost words and expressions than Carter has liver pills.
This can be disturbing stuff! ("Carter's Little Liver Pills" are gone too!)
We of a certain age have been blessed to live in changeable times. For a child each new word is like a shiny toy, a toy that has no age. We at the other end of the chronological arc have the advantage of remembering there are words that once existed ........and there were words that once strutted their hour upon the earthly stage and now are heard no more, except in our collective memory.
It's one of the greatest advantages of aging.
Leaves us to wonder where Superman will find a phone booth...
See ya later, alligator! Okidoki
WE ARE THE CHILDREN OF THE FABULOUS 50'S..
NO ONE WILL EVER HAVE THAT OPPORTUNITY AGAIN...
WE WERE GIVEN ONE OF OUR MOST PRECIOUS GIFTS:
............OUR MEMORIES........
 
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Old 03-28-18, 08:02 AM
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Fortunately this list doesn't include all the "hep cat" slang also linked to the mid-century.

More troublesome than catchy phrases lost over the generations is the loss of the "Kings English". Can todays high school graduate read Shakespeare without constantly referring to the Oxford Dictionary?
 
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Old 03-28-18, 08:22 AM
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Confess I recognized and/or have used everything in the OP.
 
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Old 03-28-18, 12:45 PM
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The only one I don't know for sure is "bib and tucker"...and I'm not looking it up...not right now. Lol

Guy...it's not just today's HS kids. My ex- asked me what the heck I meant when I said "Gird my loins" in jest the other day. Why the heck I even know that, I couldn't tell you, but a lot of her English issues comes from the schools she attended as a kid. Her Mom was pretty much on her own and they bounced around a lot in LA and St Louis. She's smart as can be in lots of areas (She was a Chief Radioman/Info Systems Tech in the Navy) but language wasn't a priority. Heck, I went to a little podunk country school in OH, but I loved reading...so that's what did it for me. Oh, and my parents were relatively old when I was born, plus I lived with my Grandmother a lot when I was in the Navy in San Diego...so I was exposed to people that used different language as adults.
 
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Old 03-28-18, 01:35 PM
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I have to say for as many times I used the word or heard it said - I don't think I ever knew how to spell murgatroyd
Some of us still use some of those words what gets me is how some of the old innocent words have change their meaning
 
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Old 03-28-18, 02:37 PM
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A rarely used word:

Indupidly!!!

Dick
 
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Old 03-28-18, 04:03 PM
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Some of us still use some of those words what gets me is how some of the old innocent words have change their meaning
Yes, it's a shame.

The word or name Gay. Originally meant fun, and pleasant, or a girls name. But now it's, well means gay!
At various times the following terms also hinted at a gay relationship if referred to the same sex...Fellow, buddy, mate, roomy, and others.
Recently I was admonished for referring to a friend of mine as Colored instead of Black. A few years back it would've been then opposite!

Hers's one for you...Know what it means? Fonozeratot or Phonozerator. Good Luck!
 
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Old 03-29-18, 06:04 AM
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Vic, I only remember bib & tucker from some old tv commercial, I think it was for laundry detergent or maybe stain remover.
 
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Old 03-29-18, 11:21 AM
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Well...I wasn't thinking right at all...made the common mistake of thinking it had to do with food somehow. Best bib and tucker | Define Best bib and tucker at Dictionary.com
 
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Old 03-30-18, 04:04 PM
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Great list Norm, thank you !
 
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