Homeowner Contract

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  #1  
Old 01-25-07, 04:31 AM
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Homeowner Contract

Hello,
Most contractors will submit a contract before doing any work. But is there available a homeowners contract that gives him leverage in case the work is installed in a shoddy manner or using inferior products?
 
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Old 01-25-07, 05:26 AM
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This should be addressed in any contract that you sign. This is an example of why you should have a real estate attorney to guide you and to see that all the bases are covered to protect you.
 
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Old 01-25-07, 08:01 AM
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I thought they only deal in the buying and selling of real estate. Then, I don't think many contractors will give me a contract, so an attorney can view it to protect my interests and concerns against both licensed and unlicensed contractors. Maybe I should draw up my own contract indicating what materials, installation methods and skill are acceptable.
 
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Old 01-25-07, 09:41 AM
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Most contracts because they are drawn up by/for the contractor are worded to protect the contractor. It should also show the payment method/schedule. There are usually provisions indicating the quality of work, job satisfaction and possibly time of completion.These are usually included so the customer will sign.

I don't think most contractors would have a problem with you having your attorney look over the contract before you sign. You could have your own contract made but it would need to have imput from someone knowledgeable about the work to be done.

The only time I would have a problem with a customer either supplying their own contract or having my contract reviewed would be if I perceived that customer would be more trouble than the job was worth.

All contracts should state the materials to be used and work to be done in a professional and timely manner. After all that's why you hire a pro
 
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Old 01-25-07, 01:32 PM
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My last home improvement was subcontracted out. All the workers were out of towners. None of them acted professionally all the time. I expected that in every part of the job and I did not get it.
I had to call the main office and complain about the workmanship to get a field supervisor to come down a look at it.

I won't be recommending the company that hired the sub's, thats for sure.
What would you think if any contractors showed up at your house with burned out table saw blades, insufficient hand tools and hardware.
I had to show them where the stores were.

These are just a few of the reasons, I asked about a homeowners contract.
 
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Old 01-25-07, 02:33 PM
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If the contractor offers a contract without a workmanship aproval clause and a date of completion with possible penalties for failure to complete in time, I would simply tell them they will not get the work without inclusion of such.

While marksr suggested the possibility if a time completion clause, I would absolutely require one. Realize that the contract can be extended with both parties approval if needed and both are willing. I have seen too many home owners taken advantage of with little recourse available.

You ,ight also want to include a housekeeping clause to require the contractor to clean up after himself.

Be sure to check his insurance, bonding, and licensure if applicable as well.
 
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Old 01-25-07, 03:51 PM
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Good advice all.
And I'll make sure that the installers are local contractors. The company I signed the contract with, must have had an agreement with a distributor of the products to use the distributors contractors. This is what I'll have to watch out for.
With local contractors, they will know where the stores are and more familiar with 1950's row home construction in my city.
 
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Old 01-25-07, 04:01 PM
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It is also wise to get several bids and CHECK REFERENCES!!!
 
  #9  
Old 03-11-07, 05:36 PM
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Short Answer

The short answer to your question is "Get a Lawyer"! There are a lot of scam artists that go by the name "contractor". The Florida hurricanes in 05 are a classic example of rip-off.

A lawyer can't guanatee you won't still get ripped off. But it would be far less likely.

Good Luck.
 
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