Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Law and Legal Advice > General Law and Legal Advice
Reload this Page >

What's the job market outlook for prosecutors?

What's the job market outlook for prosecutors?

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-24-09, 01:06 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 781
What's the job market outlook for prosecutors?

For the longest time I've been saving to go to law school. Now, at the ripe age of 40 I am ready to try my hand. Criminal law is the only area that interests me and that I'd like to pursue. My plan was to move to NY and start working in the District/State/County attorneys office and eventually become a defense attorney. I would want experience on both sides of the fence.
The problem is, if there are no openings, I haven't made any connections in the field to really be useful anywhere except being a paralegal which doesn't interest me.

Does anyone have any insight as to what the possibilities are?

Tks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-24-09, 01:40 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 20,807
Well...no real experience..but why would you want to become one of the most hated (too strong a word maybe?) people in the country?
From what I know...for what you are describing..you are looking at 6-8 yrs before you even get a shot. School, internship, associate, etc, etc. I don't think many jump from school to Prosecuter..normally (again..from what I know) they are either groomed early and start doing minor stuff (stolen bikes, public intox, etc)..or they spend years in the PD office and then get fed up....

Good on ya for having a dream..but you might want to see if there is something else that would feed the need.
 
  #3  
Old 11-24-09, 01:41 PM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,126
Being a prosecutor is really not a big money maker, but you definitely get to understand the system, meet people and make contacts once you are sure what direction you want to go in. It has been my experience that many attorneys (friends) fall in love with the defense side and stick with it it or become politicians or judges.

After 5 years of engineering (at U of MN), two years of evenings in engineering graduate school at USC , I took a job so I could go law school nights. After two years, I quit since I was burned out with school and got a 50% raise to continues in engineering, sales and management. While in law school, I did happen to open up the yellow pages and look at the number of attorneys, plus having my Torts professor served a summons in class took off a little bit of the glamor. - It was not a cheap little off the street school since Chief Justice Berger went there too. The Torts professor was representing a person in a hit and run and took the car across the state line to get the car repaired in his own name (stupid !!!).

If you are on the defense side it can get seedy, educational and entertaining. Law can be very good if you find it fits you. Not all attorneys get rich and some attorneys starting out in defense do not paid immediately. - One of my professors said that if you are defending a criminal that possible be sentenced, you will never get paid if you lose. If you get to be a partner, the firm will continue to give you a check for a while.

Law is certainly educational and entertaining.

Dick
 
  #4  
Old 11-27-09, 08:00 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 781
Ok so the money isn't there, still I want to pursue this rather than spending the rest of my life hating what I do for 40 hrs (or more) per week.

My main concern is that the openings wil be so scarce that it'll be nearly impossible to get in.

any insight?
 
  #5  
Old 11-27-09, 09:02 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 20,807
Just to throw in my $.02 again...
In my area..the county prosecuters and defenders are understaffed and underfunded like crazy. IIRC I remember reading where 2 or 3 positions are unfilled due to budget constraints and they don't expect to fill them for several years.

Of course, by the time you finished school..the economy might be in an upswing (we can only hope!).
 
  #6  
Old 12-20-09, 09:29 PM
SeattlePioneer's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Seattle, Wa
Posts: 5,503
The law firms I read about most often looking for lawyers are those doing the routine grunt work of representing people who are charged with a crime and can't afford a lawyer.

As I understand it, they probably pay a lot less than prosecutors receive and are often looking for lawyers to work for them.

You could move to the prosecutor side if you start winning cases and showing up the assistant prosecutors.
 
  #7  
Old 12-22-09, 03:32 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 781
My question is actually simpler than perhaps written out as.

I am (at least initially) looking to start on the prosecution side but wanted to get a feel for the job outlook before pursuing this endeavor
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'