car rocketing: could tires be at fault?

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  #1  
Old 01-09-13, 04:30 PM
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car rocketing: could tires be at fault?

A little over a month ago, I was on an exit ramp and my car hit a slick spot and rocketed into a guard rail, it was totaled. I wasn't drunk or anything and the almost new tires I bought for the back (rear engine/rear wheel drive) had just over 4,000 miles on them.

I can't help but thinking I should be compensated in some fashion by Michelin, the manufacturer. This was a car that I put a lot of $ into and the insurance payout doesn't cover it adequately. That and my head hurts. I have the police report, the mileage on the tire invoice, and the mileage at time of accident on the insurance report. Should I send the manufacturer the aforementioned documentation along with accident pics and see if they're willing to offer a settlement or am I wasting my time?
 
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Old 01-09-13, 06:25 PM
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You hit a slick spot and rocketed.......is that like hitting a slick spot and sliding ?

You bought new back tires but the front ones do the steering......so how could the rear tires be blamed for this issue.
Also.....as soon as you said "I hit a slick spot" you basically put your self at fault....not the tires.
 
  #3  
Old 01-09-13, 06:55 PM
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Basic rule of the road is "driving too fast for the conditions" which you obviously were.

Sorry for your car and pain but no valid claim against the tire manufacturer.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 05:39 AM
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driving too fast for the conditions
I agree! No tire can compensate for every road condition.
 
  #5  
Old 01-10-13, 05:49 AM
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There is a reason ice and black ice have such a nasty reputation. They are very slippery and car tires of any type get extremely little traction. Even what may be a safe speed for hard packed snow (almost ice) can still be way too fast for a patch of ice. If you hit the guardrail hard enough to total a car you were moving at a pretty good pace indicating that you were going too fast for the road conditions even if it was just that one little patch of ice.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 06:06 AM
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"car rocketed" is a nice way of saying "I lost control of the vehicle". Rear engine car? I'm guessing Porsche, I hear they go pretty fast.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 06:44 AM
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I don't believe you have any claim against Michelin. Chalk this one up to experience and move on.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 09:48 AM
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I agree--no claim. But I'll play Devil's Advocate and say many of you apparently have no idea how little force, speed, and damage it takes to total a car these days. A 35MPH front impact could likely discharge all airbags and last time I counted we're up to about 9 of them suckers surrounding you these days. Figure over $1000 each because for liability reasons you must use factory-new OEM replacements. Add in the parts & labor for what may be very slight damage & they're cutting you a check & wholesaling your car to someone who will fix it for cheap & sell it used.
Also playing Devil's Advocate--how can you say how sneaky and dangerous black ice is and then say he was driving too fast? Kind of a contradiction, isn't it?

Accidents happen--that's why we don't lay blame and why we have insurance.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 09:56 AM
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"how can you say how sneaky and dangerous black ice is and then say he was driving too fast? Kind of a contradiction, isn't it?"

Please explain the contradiction?
 
  #10  
Old 01-15-13, 06:09 PM
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the 911 was my baby and those Michelins were always problematic compared to other brands I used on other cars. maybe it's not worth persuing but I'll certainly advise against Michelin Pilot ASs every change I get, thanks folks
 
  #11  
Old 01-16-13, 04:58 AM
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I'm reminded of a recovery job I did several years ago; customer stated he went to turn into his driveway and he "had no brakes":
 
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Old 02-06-13, 06:47 AM
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fwiw I talked to Michelin and they said for any consideration they'd have to have the tires. Now hth is anyone gonna obtain tires from a wreck. hmm, excuse me officer, mind if I I'll jack up the car, pull the wheel, and pry off the tire (4x) before the tow truck gets here while I answer your questions. Not to mention dragging the tires home x# miles. This isn't my first set of Michelin's that didn't perform as well as other brands and this particular set was the Pilot Sport AS+
 
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Old 02-06-13, 04:35 PM
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Micheal - What do you want? You come here complaining that you felt that your accident was caused by the tires (although everyone else here disagrees) and when the tire manufacturer says they are willing to look at the tires to see if they were defective - it's just too hard for you.

It sounds to me that you just want to use this forum to air your gripe with Michelin because that's all you got left. IMO this isn't the place for it.

Here's the bottom line - black ice is dangerous and if that's what caused you to "rocket" chalk it up to act of God and excessive speed and move on. Short of chains or studs I don't think there are many tires that can handle ice.
 
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Old 02-06-13, 07:51 PM
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Everyone disagreed and I didn't argue the point further on the board. However, independently of the accident, I've never had good experiences with the brand and wanted to share my experiences with the cust. svc. as well as the model of tire. If people think it's a bunch of hooey that's fine, no one's forcing anyone to read my post, however when I shop around for things I do take people's online experiences into consideration. Thanks for your help
 
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Old 02-06-13, 08:19 PM
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The knock I've heard against Michelin tires in the past was that they were too expensive, never that the quality wasn't there.
 
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Old 02-07-13, 04:41 AM
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The knock I've heard against Michelin tires ...... was that they were too expensive
That's been my impression as well. While I've bought vehicles that had Michelins, I never could justify the price to buy a set. The only issue I've had with that brand [or most of the others] is that after enough miles - they wear out
 
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Old 02-07-13, 04:46 AM
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Ditto. I tried a set on the wrecker 7 or 8 years ago, but got no better performance or wear on them than tires 25 or 30% less expensive.
 
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Old 02-07-13, 04:58 AM
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MichaelChang,
What model of tires did you have on the car?
What was the temperature like that day and road conditions?

The reason I'm asking is tires for toy cars (high power to weight ratio) are very application specific. They make tires that can almost climb a wall they are so sticky, but only when dry and warm.
Road conditions are another fun one. Patchy snow is the best. one wheel gets a bit more drag then the other due to snow and that will break the back things loose (talking from a fwd perspective).
Road construction can be another major factor. The ashphalt used in the town I lived in a few years ago was nice during warm weather, but brutally slippery when wet.

The one suggestion I can give you is to play back exactly what happen before, during and after things went bad.
I've had a number of close calls over my driving time (wild life, other drivers, spin outs) and doing this will help you figure out what exactly happen, and where the mistakes where made or what could have been done. I've improved my driving and to this day, can still claim to never being in an on road accident (my baby got backed into in Quebec a few years back, that is my only ever insurance claim).

I drive a lot (100miles round trip for work) through the nastiest conditions possible some times. Many times I'm on the road before they end up closing the hwy. I also own a summer toy car which can get me into trouble.
 
  #19  
Old 02-07-13, 08:03 AM
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Michelin Pilot AS+ (N rated)
Chilly but not quite freezing
Damp but not soaking wet
Asphalt

All the checkboxes that point to an accident looking for a place to happen.

If that were the only incident I wouldn't blame the tires, however there has been slippage in much better conditions that other tires have handled better, the accident was merely the straw that put me over the edge. And not to flog a horse but I've taken that same exit at similar speeds/conditions and other tires haven't slipped.

Act of God, I'll buy that, but nevertheless I won't be buying Michelin's anymore regardless.
 
  #20  
Old 02-07-13, 08:07 AM
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Yeah, given that other tires gave you better results, I can't fault your thought process.

I let someone talk me into putting Firestones on a car many years ago to replace a set of Goodyears and I've never considered putting Firestones on another car since, they were that much worse.

I'm curious, though - as I said, I've never heard performance as a knock against Michelin but that's pretty much just passenger car experience - what brands did you have on the car which gave you better results?
 
  #21  
Old 02-07-13, 08:56 AM
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Bridgestone Potenzas were much better, so were Dunlops
 
  #22  
Old 02-07-13, 08:58 AM
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Unfortunately it could have been anything from oil deposit ontop of the moist ashphalt, speed, tire inflation (balanced between tires and in optimal range), suspension components, speed, sudden steering, throttle or brake adjustment, anything.

I've had a 10PSI difference between rear tires throw the back end loose in our Grand Caravan. The difference in rolling resistance in snow was enough to kick it out at.
 
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