Mirror Repair


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Old 10-14-04, 01:23 PM
ABB
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Mirror Repair

any way to fix a chip in a mirror?
 
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Old 10-18-04, 07:18 AM
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how big of a chip?
 
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Old 10-20-04, 11:36 AM
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not very big. about the size of a pea.
 
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Old 10-20-04, 08:17 PM
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Mirror chip

Because mirror chip repairs with epoxy or whatever are reflective from silver backing, the chip will always be visible and annoying. Replace mirror or learn to live with it as a character flaw. The epoxy repairs on windshields tend to keep cracks from spreading, but they don't make the chips invisible. Sorry, but there tends to be no options.
 
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Old 10-21-04, 04:22 AM
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you can sand it with a belt sander to get it out.Always keep the sander moving, never stay in 1 spot long. It will get hot and crack the mirror if you hold it in 1 spot to long. easy fix.Use 120 grit.
 
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Old 10-21-04, 06:48 AM
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Hello ABB!

Some of the first considerations have to be the type, age and condition of the mirror in question. Here's why: 1) Very old mirrors for example were made from glass that was blown into a cylinder and then sliced open and rolled flat; and over time there has been many different mirror backings used from mercury to silver to mylar. Should your mirror be an old vintage one that perhaps has been in your family for generations, or an old one with signs of age that you might have recently acquired at an auction or yard sale DO NOT attempt to fix it because you will greatly reduce it's value and future sales potential. Mirrors are VERY popular items at salvage yards and antique shops, but no one likes ... and no one will buy ... a handsome vintage mirror with a repair, especially a sloppy diy repair. So, if it's an oldie but a goodie leave it alone. 2) Newer mirrors do not have glass with the thickness and girth of the older types, they are often times very cheaply made with easily damaged backings ... very fragile, not easily cut, and seldom if ever adequatley repairable. 3) Some mirrors are frosted, smokey, wavy, and beveled ... chips in these are for the most part nonrepairable. and finally, 4) it also depends where the mirror is located in the home. Glass expands and contracts. Mirrors embeded in millwork over a fireplace for example respond to thermal conditions much like a mirror in a bath will, but one hanging in a hall or mounted behind a bedroom door will respond differently, as will one near a window and sunlight. Repairs made with epoxies and other adhesives and bonding agents will not respond in same to thermal changes as the glass in the mirror will. "twelvepole" is right about repairs being visible. Repairs, even slight ones, often become too visible and take away from the mirror as a whole ... much like a scratch or cup ring will on a fine table. Good luck, Czar
 
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Old 10-21-04, 07:03 AM
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regardless of the age it can be fixed. I've been in glass work for 27 yrs, or more, losing count.
If you need a polished edge, it can be brought back by going from 120 grit sand paper , to 220, then a cork belt. The cork belt brings back the sheen in the edge.


I guess the biggest question here is , where is the mirror, is it framed at all,

New mirrors or old are NOT hard to cut ( if you know what your doing ) that line from SalvageCzar is way out in the left field.

Glass is a liquid, not a solid mass ( tho it looks like it is ) the older it gets the thicker the bottom is ( due to gravity and liquid falling )

If you need this polished edge and it is an old mirror worth money with no beveled edges. Take it to a glass shop and have them grind and polish it down ( Polish all edges )
 
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Old 10-21-04, 07:31 AM
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From out in left field, 85 year old SalvageCzar, with a big friendly smile of course, says hello to the glasman2!!

You are 100% correct about cutting new glass mirrors ... but only with your comment "( if you know what you are doing )"

My experince with mirrors is limited .... my parents were dealers ... and my collection, which was obtained from a lifetime in salvage, only has a few priceless hand held carved ivory cased Roman Dynasty mercury and bronze backed mirrors, and just a handful of early American hand blown pre-revolution Pennsylvannian made copper and nickel backed. I wish I knew more ... but since I've been in salvage and dealing with mirrors all my life ... I will soon go to my death knowing the new ones are junk and with the mylar backings and thin brittle glass they are difficult to cut. That's one reason why glass shops have dumpsters and have to call salvage yards to cart away mistakes.
 
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Old 10-21-04, 11:02 AM
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Talking

LOL nothing personal SalvageCzar that left field looks good at times.
but with a pea size chip and not knowing if it's an antique ( which I don't think it is ) just sanding it out will fix it. As for cutting it, that goes with anything anyone does for a living. Where I could ( and everyone in my shop ) can cut NEW mirrors with ease without breaking them others couldn't. Our dumpster is filled with scrap mirror to small for use to us. IF someone was to ask about a piece of glass or mirror that was important to them I would always tell them to take it to a glass shop , but if they didn't care if it broke or wanted to learn, I would tell them how to do it.

Didn't mean to insult you, if I did sorry, forgive me snookums?
 
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Old 10-21-04, 12:54 PM
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Hiya glasman2;

You're right on target about sanding and polishing out a chip ... but I'm finding that it's become a lost art. I really wish you were here in Long Island City .... a good old fashioned experienced glass guy like you is very badly needed here ...

Insult me? Heck no glassdude; I just turned 85 two weeks ago, and after three marriages and two divorces I have no feelings left.

Haha,
Czar
 
 

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