using tempered glass on deck railing

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Old 08-21-06, 07:33 PM
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Question using tempered glass on deck railing

I have the option of using sheets of 44x75in tempered glass for a railing on my deck.The glass comes with the rubber boot ( that surrounds the glass in an aluminum frame)Should I reuse the rubber boot or just route the cedar to accept the glass?(and not use the rubber boot)I want to use the panels tall to help quiet down a noisey side of the deck.The rubber looks fine,it does not appear to be breaking down at all
 
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Old 08-22-06, 05:48 AM
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The deck railings I have done have just had the glass stopped in, and incorporated places for water to weep out on the bottom. If you were to use the marine glazing bead (which you could do if you wanted) you would have to router the wood, make a wooden frame, assemble it around the glass, insert it into the opening, and then secure that with stops.
 
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Old 08-22-06, 07:24 PM
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re-use glass

I'm trying to keep this on the cheap,I do not know what marine glazing is...what I was going to do was ..remove all the aluminum from the windows and re-use the rubber that was used in the aluminum frame,and use cedar wood for the frame.Routing a slot in the cedar for the rubber to sit in then sliding the glass in.Drilling water run off holes at the bottom,the largest problem keeping the holes clean....what do you think......will it work...or am I in left field.
thanx
 
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Old 08-22-06, 08:16 PM
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The rubber boot you are referring to is called a marine glazing boot- same thing.

In order for the marine glazing boot to perform it's job (to keep water out), it needs to go into a tight extrusion- like the aluminum frame it is coming out of. So if you measure the space the glass is sitting in (in your aluminum frame), the dado you make in the cedar would need to be the same exact width, and should be about 1/16" deeper than the glass will go into. Making the dado wider would make the boot ineffective because it would be too loose to seal and keep water out.

I'm guessing that you are going to make a frame for the glass out of cedar, so that instead of having an aluminum frame around it, the sash will have a wooden frame. Then you will be taking those sashes you have made and you will place them between a pair of 4x4's (or similar), and then secure them in place with 1x2 (or similar) stops on each side?

If you keep the sashes up off the deck by 4" or so, any weep holes you drill in the bottom will probably stay a lot cleaner. 1/4" holes will work best, no smaller. Hopefully no water would get in there in the first place, but you are wise to include them in your plans.

If you end up not using the marine glazing boot, you could just make the dado the exact width of the glass, and glaze the edges of the glass to the cedar frame with silicone.

(The tempered glass railings I have done were just pieces of glass setting between 2x6 top and bottom rails. They had a 2x2 stop on top and bottom that was dogeared on each end. They were 3" narrower than the distance between each vertical 6x6, and there were no stops on the sides- only the top and bottom. The stops on the top and bottom were thus also 3" narrower than the distance between each vertical 6x6. So you have 1 1/2" of open space on the left and right sides of the glass. Nothing was caulked or sealed, because water can simply run out at the bottom left and right corners of the glass. All they are for is to block some wind while not blocking the view.)
 

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Old 08-23-06, 04:57 AM
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These sound like insulating glass units from a sliding patio door. If so then follow XSleeper's advice on weep holes and a good seal. Most important is to set them on 1/8" thick rubber blocks on the bottom to keep the units away from any water that might get in.
 
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