Options for hanging 5' x 9' gym mirror

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Old 08-11-19, 01:07 PM
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Options for hanging 5' x 9' gym mirror

Hello,

I picked up a 5' x 9' mirror from a dance studio so I can use it in a home gym. I'm not sure what the best approach is for hanging it on finished drywall. I prefer not to glue it directly to the drywall in case I need to remove it later.

- 5' x 9' x 1/4" thick frameless mirror (Will hang horizontally - 9' across an 8' high wall)

- Mirror currently has mastic blobs on the back, which seem to add about another 1/4ish inch. Based on what I've read, it's best not to attempt to remove these blobs since it could damage the silver mirror stuff on the back. So any mounting would need to take this extra depth into consideration.

- I put a 5' level up to the wall and moved it across where the mirror will sit. Unfortunately, it seems that a portion of the wall is not perfectly straight where a foot or two on the right side of the mirror will be mounted.


So I guess I'm looking for advice on the best way to hang this mirror?

- Do I just use the J Channels you get at Home Depot or Lowes and make sure I hit studs? Not sure if this can be accomplished due to the wall not being perfectly straight? Also, is this safe to do without mirror mastic to stick the mirror to the drywall? Also, can these channels even be used due to the existing blobs of mastic?

- Do I I mount the mirror to a piece of plywood (1/4" or 1/2" plywood??) and then install a lower beam across the bottom to hold the weight of the mirror? Then connect the mirror at the top to prevent it from falling forward, and maybe frame the mirror after putting it up?

Thank you!
 
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Old 08-11-19, 01:41 PM
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So the uneven wall is not a big deal but the "blobs" of dried adhesive are more of an issue, and I agree that they should not be removed!

IMO I would run a stringer along the bottom and shim as needed to make straight and install "J" channel.

Along the top, same but use the sliding clips every couple feet to secure the top!
 
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Old 08-12-19, 04:18 AM
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You're taking a on a job that even a professional would stay away from. Call your local glass shop and tell them what you have and how you want it installed and if they will do the job.
 
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Old 08-12-19, 06:46 AM
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Thanks for the info, Marq1.

johnam - which part of the job seems to be the kicker that would even scare a professional away? The giant size of the mirror? The not-so-straight wall? All of the above?


Thank you!
 
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Old 08-13-19, 04:40 AM
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The globs of mastic could be in the wrong places and not make the mirror lay flat against the wall. Installing it with only j molding and clips is not the best way. If the mirror should break, the entire mirror can fall in large pieces. Installing with mastic will allow most of the mirror to stay adhered to the wall if it broke. Installing with mastic also allows you to adjust for uneven walls.
 
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Old 08-15-19, 01:51 PM
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So would the following be an ideal option then?

1. Adhere mirror to plywood using mirror mastic.

2. Install a track along the wall where the bottom of the mirror will sit, ensuring to hit studs ( Using some type of wood? Rabbeted? Just seated?). As Marq1 mentioned, I could try to shim the track and plywood where needed.

3. Now how to keep it from falling forward? ...I could leave extra plywood extending past the sides and top of the mirror that would allow me to screw it to the wall? Then build a frame around the mirror and screw the molding to the plywood? At that point, the mirror would be held by the mastic and the frame that's screwed to the plywood.

Thank you!
 
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Old 08-15-19, 05:06 PM
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If the mirror should break, the entire mirror can fall in large pieces
Its really difficult to provide a solution when we really dont know how much dried adhesive is present.

The adhesive is there, you have to live with it. If it wont lay flat then you have to space it out.

Either way, if the mirror is stuck it's going to break so not sure one installation is any better, I guess you have to just weigh the odds!
 
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