Sunroom/Patio Room Addition

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  #1  
Old 09-30-03, 08:55 PM
J
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Sunroom/Patio Room Addition

I have an existing 16 X 34 concrete patio across the entire back of my Split Foyer (walk out basement). We would like to cover approximately half, 16 X 16 with a sunroom.

I had thought I wanted a kneewall with sliders installed up to near the roof line.

I first received an estimate from a local contractor that had enclosed some carports and built "sunrooms" His bid was $10,000 for the following:

Cover the patio with a shed roof, frame three walls with openings for two 6 foot patio doors each. install the 6 patio doors (Pella 6 ' ThermaStar Vinyl Sliding) , cover areas between doors with vinyl siding to match trim of house, run electrical for outlets on three new walls, plus outside outlet, wire and install ceiling fan. Install tile for floor. As a licensed contractor, he is to handle all permit and inspection requirements.

While I have two local sunroom company reps scheduled this week, I know they are not likely to come anywhere near this price. The problem I am having is whether I am comparing apples to apples? This price seems too good to be true, even in this slow economy. Any glaring holes in what I described above?
 
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Old 10-01-03, 12:04 AM
L
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Only 1 "glaring hole" (SO FAR!)

Your existing slab has no footings. Around here, I couldn't build the room your contractor is talking about without footings.

The 2 "local sunroom company reps" who will be coming will probably be showing you rooms that are engineered to go on existing slabs and don't need footings.

Those engineered rooms will cost more (you knew that), and will probably be finished in 2 or 3 days. (These are the types of rooms that I build. I spend about an hour to pull the permit on each one. At least around here, your contractor would be looking at a 4 to 6 week wait to have his permit approved ((IF IT COULD BE)) and ready to pick up.)
 
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Old 10-01-03, 05:42 AM
J
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Thanks Lefty

Actually, my slab was built with footers. It ranges from ground level on the left side of the house to 3 feet off the ground at the right side where I want the addition. The entire perimeter is made of a concrete block wall with the concrete slab poured inside and over it.

He led me to believe it would meet code requirements if built as described above without adding insulation to the slab and without running the ducting of my current HVAC system out to it. It would seem that I would then need some type of auxiliary HVAC, maybe gas logs and a window A/C unit.

Things must be must slower here in NC. He said he could begin as early as mid-October.
 
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Old 10-01-03, 08:12 PM
L
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OK, the footings seemed to be covered, UNTIL:

HVAC -- THAT changes the use of the room!! You just went from a "patio room" (non-conditioned space) to "habitable living space" (conditioned space).

EVERYTHING CHANGES WHEN YOU DO THAT!!

The footings you described will work fine for a "PATIO ROOM" -- they aren't gonna FLY for "habitable space". The electrical that your contractor is talking about is fine for a "patio room" -- won't fly for "habitable space" -- you'll need an outlet every 12' feet along ALL 4 of the perimeter walls.
 
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Old 10-02-03, 08:39 PM
J
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Thanks Lefty, so much for gas logs by the jacuzzi spa. ;-)

Got an estimate tonite for a 16 X 19 patio room. Local company builds "Elite" sunrooms. A 20 inch kneewall, then 5 1/2 foot sliders, thermally broken, 2 doors, electrical outlets, install a ceiling fan that we supply, $17,000 for a shed room "studio" design, $19,000 for a gabeled roof. That includes a $400 carpet allowance, combination electric heater/AC would be $1275.

This was actually more reasonable that I had expected, but my target is under $15,000 with heat/ac and tile.

This weekend is the fall Southern Living Home Show, so I think I will see if this week economy will allow me to push the deal a bit lower.
 
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Old 10-15-03, 05:44 AM
J
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I probably have a case of information overload, but here are my estimates: All are 16 X 19

Local builder, use glass patio doors framed by 2X4 walls, gable roof with shingles to match house, trimmed inside and out with vinyl to match trim of house, run electrical outlets, ceiling fan and mount. $10,000, negotiating flooring options

Contractor that specializes in patio rooms and sunroom by Elite, $15,000 for gable ended sunroom, 36 inch kneewall 5 foot sliders all around, two exterior doors, electrical, mount ceiling fan. $400 carpet allowance.

Four Seasons, gabled roofed, same as above, but with 2 patio doors, $26,000 no flooring included (yes wonderglass)

Patio Enclosures, gabled roof, floor to ceiling glass, $21,000, no flooring included (5/8" low e insluated)

(all three Elite, Four Seasons and Patio Enclosures are low E insulated glass, rooms are "thermally broken")

Awaiting the estimate from last contractor on a room that looks more like a room addition, gable roof 5/12 with trapazoid windows, 2 6 foot french doors (1 west, 1 south) , two 3 x 4 sliders on south side, two 4 x 4 sliders on west side, one 4 x 4 slider on north wall, much more vinyl siding, all of which matches siding on 2nd floor (first floor of house all brick), electrical, sheetrock, extending house HVAC ducts to be subbed.

Any comments would be appreciated. Also specific comments on use of extensive glass on north wall vs. only a single large window allowing more insulation on that side.

Thanks
 
  #7  
Old 07-05-04, 11:01 PM
Almira
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Thumbs up I'm also planning a sunroom

a sunroom is my idea of a vacation that never ends.

You can heat most efficently with radient heat. Best ones I found were electric mats that lay over concrete, layered with concrete type material and then your choice of tile, carpet, etc.

try looking into http://www.sunporch.com for a truely economical do it yourself room that needs no building permit, and may fit your situation. I did the same round of sunroom manufactures and found sunporch to meet my needs and budget the best.
 
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