Plastic Sheds?

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  #1  
Old 03-04-06, 11:25 AM
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Plastic Sheds?

We have an approx. 10' x 8' x 2" concrete slab that previously held a dilapidated chainlink "shed". While we'd like a nice shed that will match our house and garage we're not sure we have the skills to build it from scratch. And we definitely don't have the budget to have it built.

We've considered just putting a large plastic shed there, at least until we get around to coming up with a more permanent solution. Just curious if anyone here has any experience with these things that they could share.

Are they water proof? Do they tend to leak? How long will they last? Are there any brands to stay away from? Is it OK to put it directly on top of the slab?

I've seen a reasonably priced expandable Keter shed, but can only find one review of it online.

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 03-04-06, 08:03 PM
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From what I seen Id say build your own, If you have a slab it would be very easy to do. If your not good at building things you could put up a 8x8 so you have almost no cutting but a 8x10 would be simple too. From what I seen of the plastic shed they just get dry from UV light and get brittle, wind throw them around and shelves are a problem. Im sure you live far away but if I can I will help you anyway I can. You should go to a lumber store and they have all types of shed trusses. Then all you do is throw some ply wood on and tack on a few shingles and bam. Slap a coat of paint on there and everybody will be so jealous they will want you to build them one. Also there is tons of books for doing this. Me and my dad built a 16x10x10 shed about 10 years ago from scratch and this summer will be building a 40x60x14 building. If you keep things straight you will have no problems, its when you have to cut weired shapes that make it agravating. I hope this helps
 
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Old 03-04-06, 08:20 PM
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jonezart,

You've got the concrete slab -- I wouldn't waste my time and money on a plastic shed. Spend $6 or $10 on a Sunset or Ortho book on sheds and go for building your own site-built shed. Keep it SIMPLE and you'll have no problems. Any tool more expensive than a $50 Skilsaw that you may need, you can rent. (Except for the $150 screw gun -- you BUY that one!! You'll be using it for EVERYTHING!!)

Keep things plumb and square, and you are past 90% of the battle. Plus you've got us here to help you. (And, if you live close enough, some of us in here would be more than happy to pop over for a weekend. You might be surprised what dinner at a local Mexican resturant and a few beers might get you!!)
 
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Old 03-05-06, 07:55 AM
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Thanks for the suggestions. We're not even sure how to start the project, but I'm sure the books will tell us that.

The existing slab is not even level. The structure that was there was built as a roofed dog pen. We've contemplated having it broken up and removed and just starting over.
 
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Old 03-05-06, 07:59 AM
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Pouring a new floor is very simple also but if you can it would be alot easier to used the old one if you can.
 
  #6  
Old 03-05-06, 09:02 AM
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How far out of level is the existing slab?

If it's close enough that you are thinking about putting a plastic shed on it, I'm thinking that it can't be too far off. (1/4" per ft. or less.) That would be usable. Simply trim the height of the studs of a wood shed to compensate for the slope so that the walls are plumb and the top plate of each wall is level, and they are all 4 even with each other.
 
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Old 03-05-06, 09:35 AM
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Plastic Sheds?

Keep in mind you only have a 2" thick concrete slab. That is closer to ground cover than it is to a foundation. I would not spend a lot of time and money on a base like that.

If you want a good shed put in a good slab at the right elevation and maybe a ramp if you have rolling equipment. The wood should be above the grade to prevent rot.

Dick
 
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Old 03-07-06, 09:10 PM
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Good catch Dick -- I missed that little detail.

Given it's unlevelness and thinness, I would tear it out and start fresh. Top of the new slab should be at least 4" above grade. The outtermost 6" of the perimeter should be at least 5" thick, with the rest being at least 3-1/2" thick. At 10' X 12', that's about 1-1/2 yards of concrete.
 
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