Building a shed and need experts help

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  #1  
Old 04-18-06, 06:18 PM
SBI
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Building a shed and need experts help

Greetings,

I am going to build a shed in my back yard. Planning on a 8x8 kit that comes with a floor frame.
I live in MA where temps. go from minus you-name-it to over 90 in the summer, so I need to deal with frost of course.

My concern is the foundation since I don't want to put the shed straight on the ground (even though the floor frame is treated wood). I also don't want to leave any opening between the floor frame and the ground in the perimeter of the shed because I don't want any creatures to get underneath the shed.
So I am planning on creating a square with concrete blocks (6x8x16). The size of the floor frame is 96x92-5/8 so it fits exactly 6 blocks on each side and 5 blocks on the front/back of the shed.
I will also put 3 blocks under each of the four 2x4 in the middle of the floor frame for extra support.
I will have 4" of the block deep in the ground and 4" above the ground.

Underneath the entire area of the shed (including the square foundation) I will lay a weed shield to prevent weed and other stuff to grow underneath http://homeharvest.com/weedcontrol.htm



So my question is - does this sound reasonable at all, or am I crazy?
Also, do I need to use cement between the blocks, or simply laying them next to each other is enough(basically each block touches the one next to it)?

Any input will be appreciated.
 
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Old 04-20-06, 08:03 AM
SBI
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Question Anyone...

...please...?
 
  #3  
Old 04-20-06, 08:08 AM
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Hmmmm.... I don't think just laying the blocks on the ground is going to be either stable or level. I think you should consider pouring a slab.
 
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Old 04-20-06, 08:28 AM
SBI
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Thanks for your reply.

I AM going to level them...I'll make sure they are leveled and squared. My only concern is extreme temp. and (possibly) movement of the entire brick frame. I think it will be OK, but I just want to consult what other people think, and maybe someone did it before and can tell from experience.
 
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Old 04-20-06, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by SBI
Thanks for your reply.

I AM going to level them...I'll make sure they are leveled and squared. My only concern is extreme temp. and (possibly) movement of the entire brick frame. I think it will be OK, but I just want to consult what other people think, and maybe someone did it before and can tell from experience.
I figured you were going to but I question wether they'll stay level with temperature changes, rainfall softening ground, etc. I think at minimum you'll need to cement them together.

I haven't done it before. My shed is the pre-built Ted's sheds type, it sits a few inches off the ground on a wooden frame and is secured with mobile home tie-downs. The wooden frame is in contact with ground and has held up for at least 10 years.
 
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Old 04-20-06, 09:45 AM
SBI
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So basically what you are saying is that you used a wooden frame pretty much the same way that I wanted to do with bricks?
Is it a treated wood frame?

The problem is that I am not worried about the shed flying away...obviously you are in Florida and facing different weather issues than MA...you have high winds, we have snow. I wonder if I use such a wood frame with treated wood, if it will survive the snow and moisture.
 
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Old 04-20-06, 10:06 AM
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Originally Posted by SBI
So basically what you are saying is that you used a wooden frame pretty much the same way that I wanted to do with bricks?
Is it a treated wood frame?

The problem is that I am not worried about the shed flying away...obviously you are in Florida and facing different weather issues than MA...you have high winds, we have snow. I wonder if I use such a wood frame with treated wood, if it will survive the snow and moisture.
The frame is part of the shed, the walls stick down lower than the floor so the frame is on the ground but the floor isn't. In truth there may be concrete blocks under it at some points. I'm not sure as it was here when I arrived.

I would think based on snow that concrete is the best base for you. I just think a slab would be a bunch better than blocks, even if cemented together. I really don't know much about requirements for cold climates though.
 
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Old 05-09-06, 08:38 AM
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Need Help......

Originally Posted by wreckwriter
I figured you were going to but I question wether they'll stay level with temperature changes, rainfall softening ground, etc. I think at minimum you'll need to cement them together.

I haven't done it before. My shed is the pre-built Ted's sheds type, it sits a few inches off the ground on a wooden frame and is secured with mobile home tie-downs. The wooden frame is in contact with ground and has held up for at least 10 years.
Saw you mentioning how you had your wooden shed anchored.
I am receiving grief frommy P & Z guy here in N Ky, trying to obtain a permit, because he is wanting details of how to anchor. Mine is a Martens Amish type, Lofted Garden Barn, 10 X 16. Pre-built and delivered, and set up on site. Obtaining the building permit has been my stumbling block. However, no one up here even bothers to anchor these, nor bothers with getting a permit. I had to be the dummy trying to do it right!
Anyway, any info on your tie-down method, would be deeply appreciated! Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 05-09-06, 08:59 AM
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It was there when I got there so I can't be specific on how they did it but this should help:

http://www.mygreathome.com/fix-it_guide/tiedowns.htm

The ones I have look like what they call a "hard rock anchor". This page discusses all types though, should give you all you need.
 
  #10  
Old 05-09-06, 10:20 AM
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Wreckwriter, Nice site - thanks.

Roderunner, Does the Lofted Garden Barn, 10 X 16. Pre-built and delivered, and set up on site come with a floor or do you provide a slab?

SBI, I lean towards a slab as recommended by Wreckwriter, but since the shed is only 8' x 8' you may get away with using the blocks only method, especially since they are 4" into the ground. Only you know the stability of your yard.

DWC
 
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