Shed below overhang, need ideas

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-08-07, 08:53 AM
mgiusto's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 4
Building a shed below an overhang, need ideas

I am in the process of building a shed below an overhang on my house. The floor size of this shed will be 13' x 11' and it will have a height of 6'. I am using pressure treated 2x6's for the base flooring. I live in NJ and it does get quite cold in the winter months and I want to make sure I don't run into problems with the frost line. The walls of my shed would fit right up against the ceiling of my overhang and I definitely want to avoid ground freezing to cause my shed to jilt my overhang. should I install concrete posts under my base 2x6's? If so, how many, how deep and how big should they be?

Another outside-the-box idea I came up with is to not reinforce the walls with the ceiling (not bolt them or nail them to the ceiling) and rather install a 1" or 2" thick rubber at the top of each wall which runs the entire length of each wall. When installing these walls, wedge them up against the ceiling so they are just snug in the summer, during winter if the walls rise due to ground freeze, the rubber will give allowing for the movement up and down from summer to winter. With this method I would not have to go thru the pains of digging 3' deep holes for concrete posts and can just lay my flooring on gravel bed. No weather elements reach inside the area where the floor is so rainwater and the like is not a problem if my pressure treated wood floor is at gravel level.

Here are some photo's of the job at hand. The 2x6's pictured are just laid there, nothing has been bolted together just yet.

any info on either idea or an even better idea is welcome!

picasaweb.google.com/mgiusto/shed
 

Last edited by mgiusto; 01-08-07 at 04:34 PM. Reason: adding details
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-08-07, 08:46 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,216
To avoid frost problems, you could just imagine building the framework of the shed floor just like a freestanding deck. For instance, I'm guessing your frost line is similar to where I live... 42". You'd dig 4 holes at each corner, digging the bottom out larger as a footing, then suspend a 12" sonotube in each hole. Fill all 4 holes with concrete, and place anchors for your beams into the wet cement. Then frame your floor inside that framework.

Obviously you'd want to find out whether there are code requirements to meet before you get too far into the project. Various locations have all sorts of different requirements when it comes to things like this.
 
  #3  
Old 01-09-07, 08:25 AM
mgiusto's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 4
One of the things I am wondering is whether frost is even a problem to worry about. The area is dry as a bone and it just rained a bunch day before yesterday. wouldn't the frost issue only be a problem when we are talking about water being in the ground below and a substantial amount of water at that? I don't see how much water will ever get under here (see pics) if it hasn't already. The structure I am building is a good 3-4 feet in from the width of my overhang on one side and 2 feet in on the other side. Snowfall with windgusts could possibly throw snow up against a wall possibly, but from past winters I do not recall much snow if any ever building up under this area.

there are three steel tubes in the ground supporting my overhang, the room overhead would severely outweigh the 3 walls and flooring I am installing, would the small amount of water that could possibly get under my structure in the winter cause enough pressure to cause damage to my house and not to the shed I am building? I think my shed would be the one that loses that battle, and if the movement we are talking about is an inch or less, am I worrying too much about nothing?

I just don't want to get into constructing concrete drums 3 feet down when it really isn't necessary. Add on top of that, that there may be rockbed below and if so, I can't even dig down 3 more feet to install the concrete drums.

Just looking for any insight from someone who has either done something like this or someone in the construction field.
 
  #4  
Old 01-09-07, 07:11 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,216
Yes, frost is something to worry about... especially since you plan to attach it to the house. If you built it next to the house, (freestanding) and did not attach it in any way, then it could be built off a cement pad that would be suceptable to frost. You would not build it tight to the overhang, instead you would need to leave a gap, with a flashing (attached to the new shed only) and counterflashing (attached to the house only).
 
  #5  
Old 01-10-07, 06:38 AM
mgiusto's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 4
Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
You would not build it tight to the overhang, instead you would need to leave a gap, with a flashing (attached to the new shed only) and counterflashing (attached to the house only).
What is flashing and counterflashing? can you explain or provide a link where I can learn about it and add to my designs. I would like this project to be a couple hundred dollar project and not get out of hand. I was shooting for just 3 walls and a floor but it's gotten alot more complex than I've anticipated and I just don't think the complexity is necessary.
 
  #6  
Old 01-10-07, 08:04 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,216
If you have a lean-to type roof, you will need some sort of flashing to keep water from running between the buildings, right? Well, the flashing you attach to your new shed roof will be an L type flashing. It will either go up under your eve, or will lap onto your fascia. The counter flashing is just a fancy word for an overlapping flashing. It will be nailed to the house, either under your eves, or under your fascia drip edge, and it will overlap your other flashing. Since the 2 simple overlap, they are not attached and can float seperately, which is what you might want to do if you are building the shed seperately so that it will float up and down with the frost.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'