'Nudging a shed question

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-21-08, 07:30 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 3
'Nudging a shed question

I love these sites. I have a newly constructed 10x10 wooden shed, with a loft (top heavy) It is on a slab, but it needs to be moved about a foot in one direction, then a foot in another direction to comply with setback rules. The base is made of 2x4's, 24" on center. It was a kit shed.

I am contemplating placing a row of cinder blocks along two sides of the slab, flush with same, then levering up the shed with hand tools and setting it first on shims and then on three 10' or 12' 3/4" pipes, and rolling it along. Pouring concrete is beyond my skills, and i wonder if the blocks will settle and crack, if they need rebar to hold them against the slab, or if they need to be mortared together or can just sit. The blocks will be 1" to 4" below grade once done. Alternatively, I can pay someone to pour more slab, then move the shed.

Any input I can get re the blocks being a good solution, or re using the 'hoist and roll' method outlined above, are welcome.

Thanks!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-22-08, 01:01 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 1,210
Whatever you do, make sure there is diagonal bracing on each side/top/bottom of this box. Even temporary 1x4, if it isn't there by design. Or the joints will creak open when you move the thing.
 
  #3  
Old 05-22-08, 04:26 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
You don't have to hire someone to extend your slab. Form it up with lumber and pour it yourself, smoothing and brooming it yourself. That way you can possibly get a smooth slide without having to lift it too much.
 
  #4  
Old 05-22-08, 04:39 AM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,349
Shed

After you extend the slab, use a long pry bar to raise each corner high enough to place a piece of 2x4 under the wall with the 2x4 laid flat and perpendicular to the direction you want to move the shed. Then use the pry bar to nudge it along. It will slide better on the 2x4's than on the concrete. A pipe roller will bite into the soft wood.
 
  #5  
Old 05-22-08, 06:23 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 3
Thanks

On the diagonal bracing, do you mean an 'X" on each wall, or an X across the floor and above, across the pane of the top of the walls? The walls are 1x3, with siding nailed into the flooring foundation every six inches.

Thanks again.
 
  #6  
Old 05-22-08, 07:31 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 3
Pour

I cannot manage the pour myself, is the cinder block solution any good? I heard overnight that they dont need to be mortared in, just rested on dirt or on a 4" bed of gravel. No rebar. How does that sound?
 
  #7  
Old 05-22-08, 07:41 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
Not good. You're gonna hate yourself in the morning when the poor cinder blocks sink and so does one side of your building. If you can handle drystacking cinder blocks, you CAN handle the pour. We can walk you through it, step by step. We just want you to have a good looking result, that is why we insist on doing it right.
 
  #8  
Old 05-22-08, 09:38 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 1,210
Originally Posted by Brian63 View Post
On the diagonal bracing, do you mean an 'X" on each wall, or an X across the floor and above, across the pane of the top of the walls? The walls are 1x3, with siding nailed into the flooring foundation every six inches.

Thanks again.
The object is to turn the rectangles into triangles. So an "X" makes four triangles... good... but often just one diagonal (two triangles) is good enough.

If there's nothing like that in the shed design already, maybe you can leave these braces in so the shed doesn't go a bit crooked over time. Since the studs are only 1x3 I wouldn't go cutting into them for a flush brace though.

I'd be tacking a diagonal onto every face that doesn't have sheet material attached. Sides, floor, and also spanning between the tops of walls... anyplace you have a rectangle that could turn into a rhomboid from pressure at one corner.



The footing, maybe you can pour a rude base (~4") with some rebar in it, which the cinderblocks rest on? This would get buried so you needn't worry about forms or looks so long as it's roughly flat on top.

On the other hand, I think chandler's right that you can extend the existing slab yourself with a nice edge. It'll be easier to get the height right this way too.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'