How to, and more...


  #1  
Old 10-28-00, 10:05 AM
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Got a deck I am looking to enclose. I've read the past three posts... I know, I know, we should hire a pro, that being said, let's stop and think about the name of the forum... thanks... now... back to the fun part.

First, Let's talk about the most important quesstion, and that is: load.

How can it be known 'what' can be built on what is there. As it stands, in my opinion, a deck is most useless thing, that's my view... so... sorry to digress...

The ideal,, and simplest thing to do is just frame up and shore up walls (after covering the base with two layers of 3/4 sub-floor, etc.) and then bring in trusses for the roof...... BUT BUT BUT, the question of load...

so, let's get the first answer.

How do we know what we can build on what we have...

Thanks,

Pete
 
  #2  
Old 10-29-00, 04:10 AM
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To begin with, did you build the deck? If not , you have no idea what the fellow that did used for pads. But you can bet he didn't over build, and they are not intended to carry a floor walls and roof. Neither is the beam structure under the deck.Having said this, you are going to require permits, and its the building inspector who will advise what is to be done. Without permits and inspections, your home owners insurance will not cover any damage due to structural failure. Care to chance it?
 
  #3  
Old 10-29-00, 07:12 AM
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Allan is right. First thing you need to do is draw a picture of how the deck is constructed and take that to the bldg. dept. They will tell you what, if anything, you need to do beef up the deck so it will support the room you intend to put on it. When you go to the bldg. dept., have a plan of just what you intend to erect. That will have a lot of bearing on just what you will be required to do to the deck.
 
  #4  
Old 10-30-00, 07:31 AM
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So excavating around the footings, taking measurements, determining span loads, number of footings, etc... there is no way to determine what is necc.?

Interesting.

P
 
  #5  
Old 10-30-00, 10:42 PM
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Pete, slow down and tell us what it is you want to do. If you want to install a patio or sunroom on your existing deck, that's one thing. But if you want to enclose that deck and convert it to additional living space, THAT is a whole different ballgame!! Regardless of which way you plan on going, you will have to be able to tell the bldg. dept. what it is that you have. If that means you have to do some digging to find out how big the current footings are, and some measuring to show the spans, SO BE IT!!
 
  #6  
Old 10-31-00, 08:16 AM
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Ok...
(The reason I got a little 'crazy' is, it bothers the heck out of me when I post on a DIY board and see a lot of answers that say 'get a pro'. That's all. If we wanted or felt we needed a pro, we would get one. Needless to say my expereiences with 'pros' has done nothing but cause me headaches and wasted money. I do not in ANY way mean to offend you on this, and I am sure you are the exception to the rule. It is just that my years have taught me it is better to do it and learn then to hire and let the other learn!...)

Ok, now back to the show...
I've got a deck, a big giant, useless (in my opinion) deck... about 12x20. I'd like to enclose it in such a way where at 'first' it can be a patio room, and then, at some point, if I choose to, I can make it a regular room. There are many benefits to this... My question is mostly about load. I know the deck can support itself, and a reasonable load now (ie: people, snow, etc.) but the addition weight of the actual building coupled with the weight of the all those same things (people, snow, etc.) is my worry. I've sorta got it figured as far as what the roof, etc. would weigh, so that gets me in the direction I need to go. Pulling up some or all of the floor boards to dig and sink new footings is not a big deal... I suppose I could find in books where they need to be placed, etc. The deck was built quite well (not by me, previous to my owning)...

So, that's the idea. The key here is to get a good, solid roof, and roof support system up, as far as the walls go, at this point, I really don't care, it could be screens with storm windows for all I care, as long as I know that I could 'close it up' at a later time...

I hope this helps with getting some answers...

Pete
 
  #7  
Old 10-31-00, 07:44 PM
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Any DIY forum is meant to assist people with general information about construction science, materials, & basic How-To. I can not see your house from here to tell you in detail what you need for your project. The variables are too numerous to attempt. You said you don't want to deal with a pro. Neither Lefty nor myself suggested that. We advised you to talk to the local building authorities to determine your needs. By all means, do the work yourself if you have the desire & are capable, once you have the correct info. Your years may have taught you to do & learn, but this time you should learn, then do, or this could prove to be a VERY expensive lesson.
 
  #8  
Old 11-01-00, 09:02 AM
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Allan...

Thanks for the great info!! The resources you gave on footings, etc, were wonderful! I can't thank you enough for that! As far as not saying that you need to call a pro... perhaps you should look back at some of the posts on both here and the Deck forum...

Look, I'm not wanting to pick a fight with you, but your post was pretty much worthless. I'm sure if you go back and read it you'll see that.

Perhaps someone that really knows something about the topic will key up and lend some info...

This is a great forum, and the people that post here are golden, valuable people... but the number of "hire a pro" answers I see here are quite lame... especially when you hear from who it coming from...

In any event, thanks again for the help...

Pete
 
  #9  
Old 11-01-00, 08:59 PM
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Pete, let me say first, that yes, there have been MANY times that I have suggested to a poster that they call a pro. But if you read those posts carefully I think you will find that it has usually been for one of two reasons. First, I got the impression (right or wrong) from their post that they were getting into something that was over their head. Or second, learning that what they intended to do could best be done with products and material that is only available to an authorized contractor.

Back to your project. You have a deck. You feel this a basically a useless structure and feel that by enclosing it it have a more useful function. I pretty agree with that. (But then, I am prejudiced --I build patio rooms for a living!!) My initial response to your post was to have you check with your local bldg. dept. to make sure that your enclosure met the requirements for a patio room, because if it doesn't, you will have to remove the deck and start from bare dirt to meet the code requirements to add additional living space to your house. If you decide to enclose the deck with a patio room, fine. But, if at some point in the future, you decide to convert the patio room to additional living space, be prepared to take it to bare dirt and go from there. Could you bootleg it in without permits? Sure you could. But be forewarned -- IF you decide to go that route, and IF there is ever a need for you to file a claim on your homeowners or fire insurance, you will probably find out you have no insurance coverage.

Do It Yourself is fine -- Just don't Do It TO Yourself!!
 
  #10  
Old 11-02-00, 07:57 AM
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Ok! Now, we are both on the same page! I knew we could get past all the BS.

About 'patio rooms'
Now, talk to me in the most detail you can, without your fingers fallin' off... 'bout the real differences. I'm not sure I understand the window %s, etc. More importantly are these questions.
1. What are the particulars about the roof materials? Can it still be a traditional shingled (composite) roof?
2. Can the walls sections still be stick construction? (2x4)
3. Can the windows be "real" double pained argon filled glass windows?
4. Tell me about the flooring.

This will be great help!

Thanks!!

Pete
 
  #11  
Old 11-02-00, 08:04 AM
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Ok! Now, we are both on the same page! I knew we could get past all the BS.

About 'patio rooms'
Now, talk to me in the most detail you can, without your fingers fallin' off... 'bout the real differences. I'm not sure I understand the window %s, etc. More importantly are these questions.
1. What are the particulars about the roof materials? Can it still be a traditional shingled (composite) roof?
2. Can the walls sections still be stick construction? (2x4)
3. Can the windows be "real" double pained argon filled glass windows?
4. Tell me about the flooring.

This will be great help!

Thanks!!

Pete
 
  #12  
Old 11-02-00, 10:49 PM
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Pete, let me explain it to you this way. Right now my Nissan pickup is sitting in my driveway loaded with all the stuff needed to put up a 10 X 14 patio room on an existing concrete slab. By "all the stuff", I'm talking about the extruded aluminum frame parts, about 150 square feet of dual pane windows (low-e, not argon), 90 sq.ft. of wall panels, and (3) 4' X 15' X 3" insulated roof panels (about an R-16). I will get it to the job site in on load. If I were going to stick frame a similar patio room and put a comp. roof on it (minimum slope would have to be 3/12), it would take me 5 or 6 trips to get all of the material to the job site. Not so much because of the bulk of the material, but because of the WEIGHT!!

Unless your deck was built specifically for the room you envision putting on it, IT WON'T SUPPORT IT!!
quote:<HR>Originally posted by DippinPete:
Ok! Now, we are both on the same page! I knew we could get past all the BS.

About 'patio rooms'
Now, talk to me in the most detail you can, without your fingers fallin' off... 'bout the real differences. I'm not sure I understand the window %s, etc. More importantly are these questions.
1. What are the particulars about the roof materials? Can it still be a traditional shingled (composite) roof?
2. Can the walls sections still be stick construction? (2x4)
3. Can the windows be "real" double pained argon filled glass windows?
4. Tell me about the flooring.

This will be great help!

Thanks!!

Pete
<HR>


 
  #13  
Old 11-03-00, 07:57 AM
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Let's try this a different way.

1. What are the particulars about the roof materials? Can it still be a traditional shingled (composite) roof?

OK - so it CAN NOT BE composite. Thanks.

2. Can the walls sections still be stick construction? (2x4)

Sorta answered this.

3. Can the windows be "real" double pained argon filled glass windows?

Sounds like you've got even more galss than I was thinking... this would be fine!

4. Tell me about the flooring.

Kinda forgot all about this...

Oh well, time to look into books, etc. I guess with only three posts on this forum, I should have thought about trying to be the 'one' to get it going...

Pete
 
  #14  
Old 11-03-00, 06:20 PM
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Pete, you want to add a room to your house. Go for it! But DON'T put it on the deck. THE DECK WON'T SUPPORT IT!! Tear the deck out, pour a concrete stem wall foundation and build a wood floor, or pour a concrete slab. Either of those will support it. Go from there.
 
 

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