Okay...a little peeved...

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Old 12-26-10, 08:18 AM
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Okay...a little peeved...

I need a new shed. My 8x8 is too small and just not cutting it anymore.
I WAS just going to buy a prebuilt ( because I am lazy LOL) until I saw how much they cost...the same is true of the kits...holey moley have they got pricey. 1.5-2K for a shed?
I can build one for about the same money and get better framing etc out of the deal...AND THEN I find out...
that in my city any shed/building that is larger than 10' in any measurement needs to built with footings, concrete pad, blah blah blah...
awwww come on...really????
( I do not need a $4k shed for Petes sake)

Where I was going to build a 8X12 shed, I guess I will have to settle for a 8X10...
so I know I will not build another barn style shed because you loose too much capacity to the funny roof shape...I am thinking either a salt box or just a simple slant roof shed...

for the slant roof shed (which is my wifes preference) do you think 1/4" of drop per foot is enough "slant" to the roof or would you do more...like maybe 1/2" per foot????
 
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Old 12-26-10, 08:43 AM
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Around here a 3/12 or 4/12 pitch is about the minimum pitch you want on a roof. That means for every 12" of run it will drop 4". A .5/12 would be more or less flat. That kind of drop is fine for plumbing (1/4" per foot) but not for roofs.
 
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Old 12-26-10, 09:54 AM
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The local regulations make sense. I wouldn't want one without proper support and the bigger you make it, the more support is needed. A concrete floor, IMO, is not an option, but necessary.
I agree with Scott that you need a minimum 3:12 or 4:12 pitch in Indiana due to your snow load and to let the water run off at a good rate in a rain.
 
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Old 12-26-10, 10:26 AM
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The guys have answered the pitch question...but why not do 10 x 10? A bit more floor and attic space....

I did that back in VA...since they had similar regulations. Then I added a 4' non attached wooden porch/deck and extended the roofline and supported it with posts at the corners. Inspector had no issues (surprisingly) when I proposed it since the footprint for the shed itself was only 10 x 10.

Gave me 10 x 14 storage in the attic section and room on the porch to put a couple of deck boxes on each side of the door.
 
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Old 12-26-10, 02:39 PM
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I bet the requirement for a footer has nothing to do with support for a larger building. Once you put in a footer you have a permanent structure that can be taxed. If it's just a shed on a skid it's a temporary structure and is generally not included in property tax assessment.

I have built many simple sheds with shallow pitched roofs for my rental houses and I have to say that my experiments with shallow pitched roofs are mostly a failure. The first problem was a 1:12 pitch roof where water wicked up under the tab shingles and got worse when a few leaves or snow got on the roof. Then I tried rolled roofing with the bottom overlapping edge fully tarred which worked pretty well. Unfortunately the only rolled roofing available stock in my area is pretty cheap and ended up needing repairs in a few years. And, with both roofs I had trouble with water not dripping off the bottom edge very well so I had to come back and install steel drip edges. I would do at least a 4:12 pitch if using 3 tab shingles. I have had better luck with 2:12 pitch using metal roofing. Some water does not detach cleanly from the bottom edge of the roof so some of the drops curl around the bottom edge of the metal roofing and are "flicked" back under the overhang and hit the wall of the building several feet down eventually leaving a stain. I think a steeper roof pitch or a sharp drip edge would correct the problem.
 
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Old 12-27-10, 06:42 AM
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You have room for another 8x8?

Why remove something if you can just add another one?
 
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Old 12-27-10, 07:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
The guys have answered the pitch question...but why not do 10 x 10?
I only have room for 8' width.
 
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Old 12-27-10, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Pilot Dane View Post
I bet the requirement for a footer has nothing to do with support for a larger building. Once you put in a footer you have a permanent structure that can be taxed. If it's just a shed on a skid it's a temporary structure and is generally not included in property tax assessment.

I have built many simple sheds with shallow pitched roofs for my rental houses and I have to say that my experiments with shallow pitched roofs are mostly a failure. The first problem was a 1:12 pitch roof where water wicked up under the tab shingles and got worse when a few leaves or snow got on the roof. Then I tried rolled roofing with the bottom overlapping edge fully tarred which worked pretty well. Unfortunately the only rolled roofing available stock in my area is pretty cheap and ended up needing repairs in a few years. And, with both roofs I had trouble with water not dripping off the bottom edge very well so I had to come back and install steel drip edges. I would do at least a 4:12 pitch if using 3 tab shingles. I have had better luck with 2:12 pitch using metal roofing. Some water does not detach cleanly from the bottom edge of the roof so some of the drops curl around the bottom edge of the metal roofing and are "flicked" back under the overhang and hit the wall of the building several feet down eventually leaving a stain. I think a steeper roof pitch or a sharp drip edge would correct the problem.
I do not know why the regs exist. You might be right...though I will say my city has been on "a kick" for last 10 years or so about enforcing alot of regs meant to make more "sustainable neighborhoods" as they refer to it. ( there was A LOT of "hillybilly architecture" going on around me for a good many years and the area showed it).
 
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